Children’s at the Capitol: Child health and wellbeing a big focus this year

(Kristin Marz, kristinized / Flckr)

Briefcases and business suits are lining the halls of the Capitol once again as the legislature reconvened for the 2014 session this week. The governor and legislative leaders have been promising a shorter, more focused session, but with all 134 house members and the governor up for re-election in November, legislators will be working on legislative successes they can take back to their districts.

This year, Children’s will be supporting several policies that impact the health of kids in our state.

School lunches
Recently, the internet exploded with stories about a school in Utah that was denying children lunches who couldn’t pay their lunch bill. Not only were they refusing to feed the children but they were throwing lunches away right in front of them. Unfortunately, amidst the uproar and outrage we learned that many schools in Minnesota do the same. A recent report from Legal Aid showed that 15 percent of Minnesota school districts report that their policies allow lunchroom staff to refuse hot meals to students who can’t pay.

As the state’s leading provider of health care for children, we know this is unacceptable. Children need food to grow and to learn. And they shouldn’t be punished or stigmatized because their family has limited resources or because someone forgot to pay a bill.

Children’s is part of a coalition working to put a stop to this practice and will advocate providing all students with access to a healthy school lunch. With an estimated cost to the state of $3.5 million, the costs of not providing children with adequate nutrition are far greater.

Newborn screening
Since its inception over 50 years ago, Minnesota’s newborn screening program has saved the lives of over 5,000 babies. But once a nation-leading program, recent legislative changes have begun to put Minnesota children at risk.

Between 24-48 hours after birth, blood is taken from a baby’s heel and tested for over 50 congenital conditions including cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease; conditions that often are asymptomatic at birth but that once detected can be treated. Prior to 2013, the test results and data were stored so that at any time they could be accessed for additional testing. Unfortunately, in 2013, changes were made so that test results and blood spots would be destroyed after two years and 71 days, respectively. This means that millions of children’s results are now being destroyed.

We will be working to restore the newborn screening program to ensure that parents and children have the option and ability to save their test results for future use. You can read the stories of just a few of the children that have been saved by the program.

Mandatory flu vaccines for health care providers
This flu season, Children’s has seen over 520 confirmed cases of the flu. For some patients, it’s a quick diagnosis and visit. For others, it can mean an overnight stay, admission to our ICU, or even requiring ECMO (heart-lung bypass) treatment. Children and those with immune-suppressed systems are the most vulnerable, and for a very small few, they may never survive.

We know that a hospital should be the place where people and children go when they are sick, not to become sick. Being protected from the influenza virus is one small but important step in doing that, so Children’s is supporting a bill that would make flu vaccines mandatory for health care providers.

The good news is that Children’s is already a leader among hospitals. Ninety-three percent of our employees receive their vaccination. But we can do better and so can many other hospitals.

Early childhood education scholarships
Healthy children are learning children. Research shows that investment in high-quality early childhood education improves health outcomes, socio-economic status and school achievement. Every year, over 50 percent of new kindergartners are not prepared with the skills necessary to succeed in school.  As a result, many children lag behind their peers never able to catch up.

Our health care providers know how crucial education and developmental opportunities are for children ages 0-5. That is why we have joined MinneMinds, a coalition of non-profits, education organizations, health care providers, and businesses, that are devoted to assuring access to high-quality early education programs for our early learners most in need.

Photo by Kristin Marz (ristinized on Flckr)

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