Author Archives: ChildrensMN

Don’t forget kids in cars

Cracking a window does little to reduce the heat inside a car. Never leave your child unattended in the car. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Cracking a window does little to reduce the heat inside a car. Never leave your child unattended in the car. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Dex Tuttle

I’ve often surprised myself by how forgetful I am as a parent. It’s possible I’m the only dad who has nearly forgotten that his daughter needs to eat and, more specifically, that he’s responsible for making sure that happens. I know for a FACT, however, that I’m not the only dad who has forgotten the diaper bag in the car and been forced to speed-run the grocery shopping to get a stinky child out of the store as fast as possible. On tired days after sleepless nights, I’ve forgotten that my keys are in the ignition of the car I’m driving and seriously debated being late for work to turn around and go get them.

I’m exposing a vulnerable part of myself a little when I admit this type of fault, but I know I’m not alone. As the injury prevention program coordinator at Children’s, I feel even more responsible to be mistake-free in providing a safe environment for my child, and I feel that much more silly when I fail to do so.

Subscribe to MightyWhen Quinnlyn was learning to walk, she pulled herself up on me as I sat in my “dad chair” in the living room. (I’ll admit, realizing that the recliner was a crucial part of fatherhood was a huge part of my excitement for becoming a dad, but I digress.) She grabbed my hands and smiled at her accomplishment. After a few happy moments, she started to turn and walk away, and I forgot that she wasn’t yet able to stand on her own. I let go of her hands and down she went, flat on her back. Thankfully, she was OK. She actually laughed it off (her reaction to near-injury that would soon give me anxiety) and got herself back up.

So far, my follies have been rather benign. Still, I live in eternal fear of finding myself in that vulnerable, forgetful moment when something more serious happens.

As the summer ramps into full swing, one such mistake I’m determined NOT to make is forgetting Quinn in the car. This can happen for one of two reasons: we don’t realize the danger, or we find ourselves in a moment of distraction and leave out one very important detail.

Let me first convince you that this is extraordinarily dangerous:

  • Children have lower water reserves, so their body temperatures rise three to four times faster than an adult.
  • The temperature inside a car can rise 50-60 degrees Fahrenheit every 15 minutes (on a 70-degree day, the temperature inside a car can reach 116 degrees).
  • Since 1998, more than 580 children in the United States have died from being left in vehicles.
  • In car seats, children are insulated, making it more difficult for their bodies to regulate overheating.
  • Signs of hyperthermia set in when body temperature reaches just 100.9 degrees Fahrenheit, which children will surpass in only a matter of minutes; internal organs can begin to fail at 104 degrees, and death can occur when body temp reaches 107.
  • Cracking a window does little to reduce the heat inside a car.

On most days, strapping my daughter into her car seat easily could be the final challenge on a reality game show that tests strength, patience and fortitude. Therefore, I’m admittedly hesitant to take her in and out of the car more than I need. However, you never know what will happen; on an average day, there are so many things that are out of your control and could delay a quick stop or create catastrophic failure of your car’s air conditioning. Please take control of what you can and never, ever leave your child unattended in the car.

But as I’ve already admitted, I’m forgetful. Here are some tips on making sure you don’t forget your most-precious package:

  • Place an important item in the backseat. My recommendation is to leave your phone there – thus removing a major distraction while driving – but it can be a purse, wallet, computer, jacket or any other item you know you’ll need when you arrive at your destination.
  • If you don’t carry items often and you drive a car with an automatic transmission, take the shoe off the foot you don’t use for the pedals and put it in the back seat. This can be a fun game where everyone in the family participates.
  • Leave yourself a note on the dashboard: “BABY IN BACK!”
  • Put a stuffed animal or doll in the car seat when your child isn’t in it. When you strap your kid in for a trip, put the stuffed animal in the seat next to you up front – a reminder that something is out of place.
  • If you have a GPS-enabled device, set location reminders when arriving at your favorite locations – the grocery store, work, restaurants, etc. Kars 4 Kids is developing an app that works with your car’s Bluetooth capabilities to remind you as you walk away from the vehicle.

Make arrival habits:

  • Always do a walk-around of your vehicle to ensure you’re a safe distance from other hazards and make note of items that will help you remember where you parked.
  • Always use the passenger-side doors to load and unload for trips. This will force you to walk around the car to collect your items.
  • Make a game with your child where you always sing a song, say a phrase, do an activity each time you stop at a destination. Even if your child is sleeping, the habit will keep your mind thinking about the little person in the backseat.

Other resources:

Dex Tuttle is the injury prevention program coordinator at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

Five things to know about heat exhaustion

With sun and humidity a factor during summer in Minnesota, we thought it was a good time to talk about ways to keep kids safe in the heat. In addition to our quick tips for protecting your kids from dehydration, here are tips on avoiding heat exhaustion. We believe in Making Safe Simple, so take a few moments to review these tips!

  1. Subscribe to MightyChildren adjust more slowly than adults do to changes in environmental heat. They also produce more heat with activity than adults and sweat less. Sweating is one of the body’s normal cooling mechanisms. Children often don’t think to rest when having fun and may not drink enough fluids when playing or exercising.
  2. Heat exhaustion results from a loss of water and salt in the body due to excessive sweating. It occurs when the body is unable to cool itself properly and, if left untreated, can progress to heat stroke.
  3. Signs of heat exhaustion in children are: profuse sweating, pale skin that’s cool and damp to the touch, rapid and shallow breathing, headache, nausea, normal or below-normal body temperature, vomiting or diarrhea, dizziness, weakness or fainting, and muscle cramps.
  4. If your child is experiencing heat exhaustion, move him or her to a cool place right away to rest. You should remove extra clothing and apply cool cloths (towels with cold water) and fan the child’s skin. Give him or her cool sports drinks containing salt and sugar such as Gatorade (if the child doesn’t feel nauseated).
  5. Call your doctor or go to the emergency department if their condition hasn’t improved or your child is unable to take fluids within an hour.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.

Stay safe and avoid dehydration in hot weather

Follow these quick tips to keep your kids safe from dehydration when they’re out playing in hot temperatures.

Summertime is definitely here, and what kid can’t wait to get outside and play? But staying safe in the sun, and avoiding dehydration, is important.

Subscribe to MightyWe believe in Making Safe Simple. Here are some quick tips to help your kids avoid dehydration:

  • On hot days, make sure you drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. The human body requires at least one liter of water daily.
  • Dehydration means that a child’s body doesn’t have enough fluid. Dehydration can result from not drinking, vomiting, diarrhea, or any combination of these conditions. Sweating or urinating too much rarely causes it.
  • Thirst is not a good early indicator of dehydration. By the time a child feels thirsty, he or she may already be dehydrated. And thirst can be quenched before the necessary body fluids have been replaced.
  • Signs of dehydration in children include the following: sticky or dry mouth, few or no tears when crying, eyes that look sunken into the head, lack of urine or wet diapers for six to eight hours in an infant (or only a small amount of dark yellow urine), lack of urine for 12 hours in an older child (or only a small amount of dark yellow urine); dry, cool skin; irritability, and fatigue or dizziness in an older child.
  • If you suspect your child is dehydrated, start by replenishing his or her body with fluids. Plain water is the best option for the first hour or two. The child can drink as much as he or she wants. After this, the child might need drinks containing sugar and electrolytes (salts) or regular food. Also, the child should rest in a cool, shaded environment until the lost fluid has been replaced.
  • Call your doctor immediately or take your child to the nearest emergency department if there is no improvement or condition is worsening.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.

Be smart, safe with fireworks

For many families, the Fourth of July celebration includes fireworks. It's important to take the proper safety measures when using fireworks (iStock photo / Getty Images)

For many families, the Fourth of July celebration includes fireworks. It’s important to take the proper safety measures when using fireworks (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Subscribe to MightyBy Luul Mohamed and Alicia Youssef

The Fourth of July is a day filled with fun, excitement and celebration. Across the nation, families and friends gather to celebrate our nation’s independence. Follow these tips to ensure maximum fun and prevent injuries.

Firework safety tips

Each year in the U.S., thousands of adults and children are treated in emergency rooms for fireworks-related injuries.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.

The safest way to enjoy fireworks and avoid a visit to the emergency room is to attend a public fireworks display. However, if you choose to light them yourself, here are a few ways to enjoy the fun while keeping you and your children safe:

  • Keep fireworks of any kind away from children, even after they have gone off. Parts of the firework can still be hot or even explosive after fireworks have been lit.
  • Older teens should only use fireworks under close adult supervision.
  • Keep fireworks far away from dense areas where there are a lot of buildings and/or people.
  • Do not light fireworks around flammable items such as dead leaves, gas-powered equipment or fabrics, and be sure they’re pointed away from people, animals and buildings.
  • Always have a fire extinguisher, water bucket and/or hose readily available in case of an accidental fire.
  • After you have enjoyed your fireworks, be sure to pick up any debris or pieces of the firework that may be left in the area. These small pieces may pose as a choking hazard for young children.

The Fourth of July weekend also is a great time for travel and spending time in the water. Please view these articles for tips on water safety and traveling:

Fireworks references: The National Council on Fireworks Safety, Parents: Fireworks Safety

Luul Mohamed and Alicia Youssef are members of Children’s injury prevention program team.

Precautions increase camping enjoyment

Camping can be an enjoyable activity to share with family and friends. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Camping can be an enjoyable activity to share with family and friends. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Luul Mohamed and Alicia Youssef

With school over and summer officially under way, a camping trip can be an enjoyable activity to share with your family and friends. Take advantage of these tips to have a fun and safe trip:

Skin and eye protection

First and foremost, you must effectively protect your skin before engaging in any outdoor activity, regardless of the weather.

  • The sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so try to plan outdoor activities before or after those times.
  • Children 6 months and older should use sunscreen with a SPF (sun protection factor) of 15 or higher that protects against UVA and UVB rays. Do not use sunscreen on children younger than 6 months as they may ingest the sunscreen by sucking on their fingers or arms. Additionally, their skin is thinner and may absorb chemicals from the sunscreen. Instead, cover infants head to toe in clothing to keep them shaded at all times.
  • Wear sunglasses that go around the entire head that also protect against UVA and UVB rays.
  • Try to wear protective clothing that covers your arms and legs, wear a wide-brimmed hat and try to stay in the shade when you can.
  • Protect yourself from bug bites by applying bug repellent with DEET. The CDC recommends a 30-50 percent concentration of DEET to prevent the spread of pathogens carried by insects.
  • Sunscreen should be reapplied regularly, and bug repellent should not.

Subscribe to MightyPrepare yourself

  • Bring more than one first-aid kit.
  • Bring safe and healthy food with mostly nonperishable items and make sure all food is in waterproof containers and tightly packed.
  • Let others know where you’ll be going beforehand.
  • Avoid hypothermia by bringing insulated bedding and warm clothing for nights.
  • Stay well hydrated during the day by drinking plenty of water.

Water safety

  • Avoid swallowing water while swimming.
  • Always swim with a buddy and make sure there is an adult supervising at all times.
  • Whenever you are riding a water vehicle, always wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket. Minnesota law requires children younger than 10 years old to wear a life jacket. We recommend that children older than that also should wear life jackets.
  • A life jacket should properly fit. You can determine the fit by a child’s weight.

Splish splash: The ins and outs of water safety (Twin Cities Moms Blog)

Fire/bonfire safety

  • When starting a fire, only burn dry, not damp, material and don’t use fire accelerants such as gas or lighter fluid.
  • Start the fire away from flammable things like trees and keep a bucket of water near.
  • Children should be supervised at all times and never near the fire.
  • Never burn containers that have foam or paint in them and never put pressurized containers into a fire. They may explode and release dangerous fumes.

For more information on camping safety, visit:

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.

Luul Mohamed and Alicia Youssef are members of Children’s injury prevention program team.

Laser in action: See how Gavin’s tumor met its match

Gavin Pierson (left) and Joseph Petronio, MD, visit during a photo shoot at Children's – St. Paul on Monday, June 16, 2014.

Gavin Pierson (left) and Joseph Petronio, MD, visit during a photo shoot at Children’s – St. Paul on Monday, June 16, 2014.

In the two years since Gavin Pierson’s brain tumor, which he calls “Joe Bully,” was discovered, he has undergone 17 surgeries. A combination of craniotomies and the Pfizer drug, palbociclib, had been managing the growth of Joe Bully, but not decreasing its size. Gavin and his family were growing tired and frustrated with invasive surgeries, and Gavin wasn’t bouncing back as well as they hoped.

Enter Visualase.

Visualase is a laser used for neurosurgery and is guided by MRI images to precisely target areas of the brain that were previously thought inoperable. After making a 3-centimeter incision, Joseph Petronio, MD, and his team guided a small laser fiber directly to Gavin’s tumor. Children’s is the only pediatric hospital in the Midwest using Visualase, and Gavin is the only patient in the country to use this technology to treat a mature teratoma brain tumor.

Learn more about how Dr. Joseph Petronio used the Visualase laser:

Subscribe to MightyNot only did this technology target and dissolve a significant portion of Gavin’s tumor, it’s also prohibiting re-growth – stopping Joe Bully in its tracks. The laser is so targeted that the brain tissue surrounding the tumor was unharmed, making for a quick recovery. Within 12 hours, Gavin was sitting up, eating and laughing with his siblings and parents. Gavin went home the next day and was back to school within four days.

These types of minimally invasive surgeries have incredible benefits for Children’s patients. Since obtaining Visualase in October 2013, Children’s has treated patients as young as 12 months for epilepsy and other types of brain tumors. Tools like Visualase are making tumors we once thought were inoperable – operable.

Gavin vs. Joe Bully: First-of-its-kind laser surgery shrinks tumor by more than 40 percent

The Piersons (from left), Steve, Gavin, Nicole, Grace and Gage, have been through a lot in the past two years.

The Piersons (from left), Steve, Gavin, Nicole, Grace and Gage, have been through a lot in the past two years.

If you’ve been following 8-year-old Gavin Pierson’s story, you know he and his family have been through a lot. In 2012, Gavin was diagnosed with a mature teratoma brain tumor.

Since then, he has undergone numerous craniotomies and he and his family have dealt with big drug companies to fight his brain tumor, which Gavin refers to as “Joe Bully.” Unfortunately, Joe Bully is a particularly tough tumor, located in an area that is difficult to operate on and comprised of hard, “concrete-like” tissue. While Gavin’s prior treatments made progress, Joe Bully kept growing back.

give_gavin_blogBut it appears that Gavin’s neurosurgeon, Joseph Petronio, MD, may have found Joe Bully’s weak spot. Over the past eight months, Gavin has undergone two Visualase laser surgeries, an MRI-guided procedure designed to incinerate the tumor. He’s the first patient with a mature teratoma to ever use Visualase – and it may have stopped Joe Bully in its tracks.

Children’s and the family also successfully petitioned pharmaceutical company Pfizer to grant Gavin access to an experimental drug, palbociclib, to help control the tumor’s growth. Gavin is the youngest patient to use palbo.

We’re happy to announce that a recent MRI scan showed Gavin’s formerly peach-sized tumor has shrunk more than 40 percent. Even better? There are no signs of regrowth.

Gavin’s courage and strength inspire us every day. Thank you, Gavin, and congratulations.

Learn more about Gavin’s story and surgery:

Meet Red-Vested Rockstar Debbie Closmore

Debbie Closmore is a St. Paul volunteer with nearly 200 hours of service.

Debbie Closmore is a St. Paul volunteer with nearly 200 hours of service.

Children’s volunteer Debbie Closmore truly lights up a room with her laughter and positive energy. She isn’t afraid of a challenge and loves stepping up to the ever-changing needs in the surgery department.

Why she rocks

Debbie is a volunteer on the St. Paul campus; she was a float volunteer and currently serves as a peri-operative escort in our surgery department. She’s energetic and fun. Debbie serves as a trainer for new volunteers, passing on her knowledge and expertise. See why she got into volunteering at Children’s:

“I got into volunteering with hopes to ease the anxiety for children and their families during a stressful time,” Debbie said. “Spread a little joy!”

What’s your favorite thing to do outside of volunteering?

“I love spending time with my husband, family and friends. I also enjoy biking, hiking, yoga and walking, staying active.”

Do you have any kids or pets of your own?

“I have a stepson, daughter-in-law and five grandchildren.”

If you could create a new candy bar, what would be in it and what would you name it?

“My candy bar would be made with raw pecans, dates, figs, sunflower seeds and dark chocolate. I would name it ‘Healthy Me.’ ”

Share a favorite volunteer experience or story.

“I spent many hours rocking and holding an infant boy. Every week I went to his unit to rock and talk with him; we really had a connection. When he smiled at me, my heart sang.”

Thank you, Debbie, for your bright, positive energy and true commitment to Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota!

How to prevent and treat bug bites and stings

By Erin Dobie, CNP

Minnesota summers bring warm weather and opportunities for our kids to go outside exploring and playing in nature. Pesky insects often irritate or interrupt summer fun. Learn how to prevent insect bites, treat bites when they do occur, remove ticks and how to know when you should seek medical attention for your child.

How to treat bites

Insect bites and bee stings react because of venom injected into the skin. The severity of reaction depends on your child’s sensitivity to the venom. Most reactions are mild, causing redness, local swelling and irritation or itching. These usually will go away in two to three days. Calamine lotion or any anti-itch gel or cream may help soothe the itching.

Bee stings cause immediate pain and a red bump, but usually the discomfort lessens within 15 minutes. More than 10 bee stings at once (extremely rare) may cause a more-severe reaction with vomiting, diarrhea and headache. Allergic reactions to bee stings can be severe and quickly get worse. These reactions include difficulty breathing, swelling of the lips, tongue or throat, or confusion. Children who have a severe reaction need immediate medical attention, and you should call 911. If the child has a known bee allergy and an Epi-pen is available, the Epi-pen should be administered in addition to calling 911. If a stinger is present, try to rub it off with something flat such as the edge of a credit card. Do not try to squeeze the stinger out or try to dig it out. If it does not come out easily, soak the area in water and leave it alone to come out on its own.

Tick bites don’t often cause much of a local reaction. They’re primarily concerning because they can transmit infectious diseases. Ticks are prevalent in Minnesota. They’re generally found on the ground in wooded or heavily bushy areas. Ticks can’t jump or fly. Generally they climb grass and climb onto someone to attach as we brush up against them. Ticks are most active during the spring and summer months.

There are a few different infectious diseases that can be transmitted by ticks, but the most common one found in the Minnesota-Wisconsin area is Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi). To infect a person, a tick typically must be attached to the skin for at least 36 hours. The incubation period, the time from infection to being symptomatic, is anytime between three and 30 days.

Lyme disease can present in many different stages. Early localized stage often includes a red ring-like rash (or may resemble a “bull’s eye” target) that slowly expands. Other symptoms include headache, fever, joint or muscle aches and overall not feeling well or excessively tired. If your child develops these symptoms within a few days to weeks after tick exposure you should seek medical attention to evaluate for Lyme disease. Lyme disease is evaluated by medical history, physical examination and sometimes a blood test. It may take the body several weeks to develop antibodies and the blood test may not show up positive early in the disease. Most cases of Lyme disease are easily and successfully treated with a few weeks of antibiotics.

How to prevent a bite

Prevention is the key to avoiding insect bites. I recommend insect repellent that contains at least 20 percent DEET. The higher concentration of DEET does not indicate better repellent; it just means that the repellent will last longer. Most repellents can be used on infants and children older than 2 months. Other effective repellents contain permethrin, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus and IR3535. Permethrin-treated clothing is an option if the child will be camping or on wooded hikes. Finally, showering or bathing soon after exposure to tick areas is important to check for and remove ticks. Parents should pay close attention and check children for ticks under the arms, in and around the ears, inside the belly button, behind the knees, between the legs, around the waist and especially in their hair on their scalp. Dogs should be treated for ticks, but also checked as the ticks can ride into the home on the dogs then attach to a person later.

How to remove a tick

If you find a tick attached to your child’s skin, there is no need to panic.

  1. Use a fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.
  2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Do not twist or jerk the tick, as this often can cause the tick’s mouth to break off and remain in the skin. If the mouth breaks off: try to remove it. If it cannot be removed easily, don’t dig it out; just wash and allow it to fall out on its own.
  3. After removing the tick, clean the skin with soap and water or rubbing alcohol.

The road to recovery: Pediatric cancer services

Each year, close to 12,500 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with cancer. Among them who live in the Upper Midwest, more than 70 percent are treated by Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. This week we shared Jenna Carnes’ cancer journey on Twin Cities Moms Blog. Jenna is one of many teens we see in Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Clinic each week, and just like every pediatric cancer patient, her journey is a unique one.

Jenna Carnes (left) and her mother, Barbara, enjoy a Minnesota Twins baseball game at Target Field in Minneapolis. (Photo courtesy of Barbara Carnes)

Jenna Carnes (left) and her mother, Barbara, enjoy a Minnesota Twins baseball game at Target Field in Minneapolis. (Photo courtesy of Barbara Carnes)

“Like all of our patients, we want Jenna to still be a kid and not to have to grow up too quickly because of the disease she’s dealing with,” said Dr. Joanna Perkins, Jenna’s treating physician in the Cancer and Blood Disorders Clinic at Children’s. “With the suite of treatment options we offer, Jenna’s been able to get back to being a normal teen.”

Beginning with the Child Life department, Jenna utilized many of Children’s support services to help her in her healing journey. From how to talk about cancer with her friends at school to going to surprise Minnesota Twins baseball games with her family, Jenna said her child life specialists made each day that she was at the hospital just a little easier. This was a welcome relief for her family.

“What makes Children’s different than any other hospital are the services we offer that go above and beyond standard inpatient care,” said Dr. Perkins. “From the supportive care – ranging from physical therapy, psychology and nutrition specialists, music therapy, massage and pain and palliative care – to special events geared towards the whole family, we try to make the time kids and families have to spend in the hospital as good as it can be. A lot of kids appreciate the simple things, too – big TVs and video games.”

In addition to Children’s in-house services, many patients (including Jenna) go to Camp Courage in Maple Lake, Minn., to “just be a kid” for a week each summer. The camp also provides patients’ families with a much-needed break. With Children’s staff physicians and nurses, onsite, to administer medication and keep close watch on their patients, patients and their siblings take part in time-honored camp traditions and let loose for the week.

“Kids of all ages are there, and we’re all going through something really similar,” said Jenna. “There are no strange looks.”

As Jenna and her family prepare to celebrate the end of her chemotherapy treatments, Jenna’s care team at Children’s will be by her side, cheering her on at her end-of-treatment party on June 12. Soon, Jenna will be a part of Children’s Destination STAR (Surveillance and Testing After Recovery) Clinic, which assists her with the transition to life after cancer therapy. She’ll work with Children’s Health and Wellness Team, consisting of staff members from oncology, nutrition services, physical therapy, psychology and child life, as well as her primary care physician for wellness visits to make sure the cancer does not return.

“Going to the hospital for cancer treatments will never be fun,” said Jenna. “But, I’m honestly going to miss coming to Children’s – it’s almost become a second home.”

Visit Children’s Hospitals and Clinics’ Cancer and Blood Disorders Clinic for more information. Children’s first annual Shine Bright Bash on Sept. 13 is to celebrate and support the advancements in pediatric cancer and blood disorder care.