Author Archives: ChildrensMN

Life jackets greatly reduce risk of drowning

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Dex Tuttle

According to the Minnesota Water Safety Coalition, it’s estimated that half of all drowning events among recreational boaters could have been prevented if life jackets were worn.

As a parent, it doesn’t take much to convince me that the safety of my daughter is important, and more specifically, directly my responsibility. This statistic is alarming. Especially since drowning is the second-leading cause of unintentional injury-related death among children ages 14 and younger.

My daughter, Quinnlyn, loves the water. It’s easy to get caught up in her excitement and joy as she splashes around and giggles that addicting toddler laugh, so much so that I often forget the dangers inherent in water for a child who is oblivious to them.

Subscribe to MightyStill, as an attentive parent, it’s hard for me to believe that drowning is an ever-present danger for my little one. That’s why it’s important to consider the staggering statistics around near-drowning incidents.

Since 2001, an average of 3,700 children sustained nonfatal near-drowning-related injuries.  To spare you the details, check out this article.

When protecting your children around water, there’s little to nothing that can supplement uninterrupted supervision. However, a life jacket will provide significant protection for your little ones and help instill a culture of safety in your family. Here’s how to know if it fits right (thanks to the United States Coast Guard):

  • Make sure your life jacket is U.S. Coast Guard-approved on the label on the inside of the jacket.
  • Ensure that the jacket you select for your child is appropriate for his or her weight, and be sure it’s in good condition. A ripped or worn-out jacket can drastically reduce its effectiveness.
  • Football season is here again (YES!), so consider the universal signal for a touchdown – after the life jacket is on and buckled, have your child raise his or her arms straight in the air. Pull up on the arm openings and make sure the jacket doesn’t ride up to the chin; it’s best to find out that it’s too loose before getting in the water.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.

When it’s critical, so is your choice – Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

Dex Tuttle is Children’s injury prevention program coordinator.

Family screening tests risk of developing type 1 diabetes

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

The McNeely Pediatric Diabetes Center is part of an international research network called Type 1 Diabetes TrialNetThe center is screening relatives of individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) to see if they are at risk for developing the disease. The TrialNet research study offers a blood test that can identify increased risk for T1D up to 10 years before symptoms appear.

Subscribe to MightyTrialNet offers screening to individuals:

  • Ages 1-45 with a parent, brother, sister or child with T1D
  • Ages 1-20 with a niece, nephew, aunt, uncle, grandparent, half-brother, half-sister or cousin with T1D

Screening is available in the McNeely Pediatric Diabetes Center (located on the fourth floor of the Gardenview building at Children’s  St. Paul, 345 N. Smith Ave., Suite 404. There is no fee to participate, and parking vouchers will be provided to all participating families.

For more information or to refer eligible families, contact Brittany Machus, clinical research associate, at brittany.machus@childrensmn.org or (651) 220-5730.

Mother shares story of her hero

By Courtney Kile

When you think of a hero, chances are it’s someone who has helped you or inspired you – your parents, a teacher or a religious figure. My hero is about 3 feet tall, likes cheesy pizza and is obsessed with the PAW Patrol. He’s my son.

I married my husband, Robert, in 2009. Before the ink was dry on our marriage license, we were ready to make our duo a trio. Every month I’d take a pregnancy test, only to be let down. After nearly two years of infertility and loss, we were thrilled to find out I was pregnant! My dream was coming true.

Courtney Kile was pregnant with her son, Sullivan, in 2011.

Courtney Kile was pregnant with her son, Sullivan, in 2011.

At 20 weeks, we found out we were having a boy. His name would be Sullivan James, “Sully” for short. He was healthy, and everything looked great. Pregnancy was tough, and after being diagnosed with pre-ecclampsia at 37 weeks, doctors decided it was time for Sully to arrive.

I was prepped for surgery at our hospital in Duluth, Minn. On Nov. 14, 2011, Sullivan James Kile came screaming into the world at 6 pounds, 8 ounces; he was perfect.

Sullivan "Sully" James Kile was born Nov. 14, 2011.

Sullivan “Sully” James Kile was born Nov. 14, 2011.

When I finally got to see him, he was in the level-two nursery with an IV and oxygen cannula. Robert and I were told that because Sully was early, he just had to “turn the corner,” and that’s why he had low oxygen saturations.

Very early next morning, I surprised to see Sully receiving an echocardiogram. Once the test was finished, the nurse told me the doctor was on the phone. That’s when my world came crashing down.

“Courtney, the Life Flight team from Children’s – Minneapolis is on their way,” he said. “They will be there in five minutes. I think Sully has something wrong with his heart and he is going to need surgery. You should probably call your husband.”

It was like being hit by a wrecking ball. All I remember was barely being able to dial my husband’s number and screaming at him to get to the hospital.

I went back and held Sully. I was rocking him in a chair when Robert arrived, his eyes red-rimmed from crying. Everything was a blur. As the life flight team updated paperwork, the nurse at our local hospital turned to us and said, “Why don’t we take a few pictures, ya know, just in case.”

Just in case? Just in case of what? This was not how this was supposed to go. We were in shock. We took a picture together and then Sully was taken to another hospital a mile away to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). His umbilical cord chunk had been removed and replaced with a central line IV. He was given prostaglandins to help his heart function properly.

Shortly after his birth, Sully had to be flown from Duluth to Children's – Minneapolis.

Shortly after his birth, Sully had to be flown from Duluth to Children’s – Minneapolis.

While I was signing releases for the transport, Robert looked at me and said, “I have only held him twice.” The flight nurse from Children’s overheard him and picked up Sully and gave him to Robert for a hug. It’s overwhelming to be a new dad, and after being thrown into a situation like this, it was comforting for Robert to have a moment with his new baby boy. Sully was taken to the airport, and Robert and I set off for the excruciating two-hour drive to Minneapolis.

Shortly after we arrived at Children’s, the cardiologists gave us our answer: Sully had pulmonary atresia with tetralogy of Fallot. When a baby is in utero, the ductus pumps the oxygenated blood to the lungs. Once a baby is born, the ductus closes and the pulmonary valve takes over. Sully’s pulmonary valve was covered in tissue and couldn’t open. When his ductus started to close, he wasn’t getting enough oxygenated blood to his lungs. The prostaglandins they gave him in Duluth were to keep the ductus open. Sullivan was scheduled for surgery the next morning. He was too young for a valve, so they were going to put in a shunt to temporarily pump the blood properly until he was old enough for a valve placement.

Subscribe to MightyWe were transferred to the Cardiovascular Care Center (CVCC). Sully was placed in a huge bed, with wires everywhere; I just wanted to hold him.

As I cried to myself, his amazing nurse looked and me and said, “Do you want to give him a quick snuggle?” I nodded and she expertly picked him up ­– wires, tubes and all – and put him in my arms. It was important to us to have those special moments where we could be parents in the midst of all the chaos.

The next morning, Sully was sedated and prepped for surgery. To say we were scared would be an understatement. We gathered around him and said a prayer. Then they wheeled him away. Waiting for him to get out of surgery was hard, but a social worker repeatedly checked on us, making sure we were OK. Just as I was about to crack under pressure, Sully’s surgeon, Dr. Frank Moga, came and told me that everything went perfectly. I calmly walked to the bathroom and lost it. Relief washed over me.

Sully had heart surgery at Children's.

Sully had heart surgery at Children’s.

We were told that it takes most children 10 days to two weeks to leave the hospital after surgery because they have to learn to eat. Sully shocked doctors by learning to eat immediately. They were impressed by how quickly he was healing. Six days after open heart surgery at 3 days old, we got to take our boy home the day before Thanksgiving.

Six days after open heart surgery at 3 days old, Sully went home the day before Thanksgiving in 2011.

Six days after open heart surgery at 3 days old, Sully went home the day before Thanksgiving in 2011.

We planned how it was going to be when we brought Sully home, but nothing prepared us for our new reality of medicine, an oximeter and scale. I was a germaphobe, coating everyone in hand sanitizer. We were glad to be home, but there was a dark cloud looming knowing that Sully would need a total repair surgery for his valve in the next few months. Luckily, his team at Children’s calmly handled my anxiety and answered all of my late-night phone calls and emails. Every follow-up appointment and conversation brought hope and confidence. The staff at Children’s taught me how to advocate for my son and made me feel that I had a voice. Whenever I would second guess myself, I would remember the surgeon telling me, “We see children every day, but you see yours every day.”

At 5 months old, Sully had to have a second surgery.

Sully appears to be waving at the camera in this photo.

When he was 5 months old, Sully’s cardiologist, Dr. Marko Vezmar, told us it was time for surgery No. 2, which would take place exactly 6 months after his first surgery. The anxiety returned. My saving grace was that I knew we were coming back to a safe place.

Sully Kile

At 5 months old, Sully had to have a second surgery.

As hard as the first surgery was, the second one was far worse. We knew him now. We knew his personality. But once again, the team worked miracles. After eight days on the CVCC, with constant love and support from Sully’s care team, we were sent home.

After his second surgery, Sully was ready to go home again.

After his second surgery, Sully was ready to go home again.

We pulled away from Children’s, and I cried. Six months of living in uncertainty and limbo were over. No more oximeter, no more scales, no more meds; it was done. We could be a normal family– at least our own version of “normal.”

Today, Sully is an active 2½-year-old with shining blue eyes and a heartbreaker smile. He spells his name, likes to sing Zac Brown Band songs and turns his nose up at broccoli. He seems like your average toddler, but Sully is a warrior.

Sully celebrates his second birthday with a cupcake.

Sully celebrates his second birthday with a cupcake.

Sully was destined to be ours and show everyone what a fighter looks like. He‘s the definition of miracle and hero. He’s my best friend, and he’s here because of Children’s. I’m thankful to everyone at Children’s, from the nurses and surgeons who were by his side, to the cafeteria worker who remembered me every morning – they all made those tough days a little brighter.

Sully’s strength has inspired us and others. Because of the support we received from Children’s, Robert and I knew we had to help our fellow heart families and heart warriors. We started a nonprofit for cardiac families in Minnesota called Project Heart to Heart. We’ve been able to help other families and made lifelong friends.

It’s not the norm for most, I guess, but this is our world. I wouldn’t change a thing. I’m the mom of a miracle.

Picture10Many people never get to meet their hero; I gave birth to mine.

New Minnesota immunization requirements take effect in September

Minnesota’s new immunization requirements take effect Sept. 1, and with August serving as National Immunization Month, we urge parents to get their children’s vaccinations updated ahead of the upcoming school year.

The Minnesota Department of Health's statewide requirement changes were made to protect kids from measles, whooping cough and other preventable diseases. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

The Minnesota Department of Health’s statewide requirement changes were made to protect kids from measles, whooping cough and other preventable diseases. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

The Minnesota Department of Health’s statewide requirement changes were made to protect kids from measles, whooping cough and other preventable diseases.

Getting vaccinated before September is important.

“Vaccines take about a month or so, in general, to really be full force and working for your body effectively,” Pamela “Gigi” Chawla, MD, Children’s senior medical director for primary care, said in an interview with KARE-TV. “We want kids to be ready for their school year.”

The new requirements include:

  • Hepatitis A and B vaccinations for children enrolling in child care or school-based early childhood programs
  • Pertussis vaccine added to tetanus-diphtheria vaccine for seventh-graders
  • Meningococcal meningitis vaccine for seventh-graders

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, vaccinations given to children in the past 20 years will prevent an estimated 732,000 deaths and save $295 billion.

Looking to schedule an appointment? Contact one of our 12 clinic locations.

Changes to state’s immunization law (KARE-TV):

Collaborative caring in eating disorders

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Pam Macdonald and Janet Treasure

Eating disorders have a profound impact on individuals, as well as the people who care for them.

Eating disorder symptoms have immense social and emotional ramifications for families and loved ones. Symptoms vary and can be frightening, intrusive, antisocial, anxiety provoking and frustrating. The behaviors involved in limiting calorie intake, increasing calorie expenditure, or uncontrolled calorie intake, take many forms. The physical consequences are alarming and distressing. All semblance of normality disappears, social life evaporates, future plans are put on hold and interactions around food increasingly dominate family relationships. It can feel akin to living within a maelstrom.

Promoting beliefs that sustain hope and empower families may be an important step in reducing caregivers’ feelings of helplessness and interrupt unhelpful interactions.

Subscribe to MightyResearchers at King’s College London are equipping caregivers with tools aimed at reducing distress and boosting care-giving efficacy to support their loved ones on the road to recovery. Headed by world eating disorder specialist Dr. Janet Treasure, who will be speaking at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota on Monday, Aug. 4, the caregiver skills training is intended as an adjunct to the individual’s treatment program. The skills training program is the result of several empirical research studies and has been designed to provide caregivers with information on treatment goals, prognosis and maintenance factors to which they are entitled, without breaching patient confidentiality.

Utilizing a “dolphin-like” approach of warmth, gentle nudging and negotiation caregivers are taught how to listen to and analyze their emotional responses while reflecting upon what they might need to change in their own situation. Dr. Treasure’s interventions incorporate basic motivational interviewing techniques. The goal is for caregivers and professionals to work in partnership to promote the following:

  • Strengthen the caregivers’ belief in their own abilities to make change possible
  • Give caregivers the opportunity to express concerns about the cause and effects of the illness
  • Discuss the basic principles of behavior change
  • Teach good communication skills (the ability to express and process emotions)
  • Promote respect, satisfaction and a unified approach within the family (and extended family) unit
  • Learn the skills of problem solving
  • Maximize caregiver skills (warmth with limits and boundaries)
  • Highlight those factors which may be aggravating the problem
  • And, above all, encourage caregivers to practice self-care.

Are you a dolphin parent?

The skills training intervention uses a series of lighthearted animal analogies to encourage the caregiver to reflect upon his or her default caring style; for example, a kangaroo does everything to protect, keeps their loved one firmly in the pouch in an effort to avoid any upset or further stress, while the rhinoceros, fueled by stress, exhaustion and frustration, or simply one’s own temperament, attempts to persuade and convince by argument and confrontation. Emotional responses are captured with the help of the ostrich, who avoids talking and thinking about the problem, frequently due to the difficulty in coping with the distress of challenging eating disorder behaviors. The jellyfish becomes engulfed in intense emotional responses. These may include high levels of self-blame or perfectionist tendencies with regards to parenting skills or expectations of what it is to be a “good parent.” As illustrated above, the goal of the intervention is to promote a dolphin-like behavioral approach to caring and a St. Bernard emotional approach, responding consistently – reliable and dependable in all circumstances.

Dolphin parenting presentation

Children’s Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders is sponsoring a short presentation by Dr. Treasure from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 4, at the John Nasseff Conference Center, 333 Smith Ave. N., in St. Paul. No registration or fee is required to attend.

The Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders

The Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders delivers the leading evidence-based treatments to patients of all ages and with all types of eating disorders. After a comprehensive assessment, the team develops an individualized approach for each patient. We offer customized inpatient and outpatient treatment for children, adolescents and adults. We use the latest evidence-based treatments, including: family-based therapy (FBT) and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy – Enhanced (CBT-E).

Everyone on the team — including psychiatrists, psychologists, hospitalists, dietitians and social workers — has special training in motivational strategies and the core treatments for helping children, adolescents and adults with anorexia, bulimia and other eating disorders. We offer inpatient treatments for young patients through college age at Children’s – Minneapolis, and for adults at Abbott Northwestern Hospital.

Janet Treasure, Ulrike Schmidt and Pam Macdonald co-edited “The Clinician’s Guide to Collaborative Caring in Eating Disorders.”

Red-Vested Rockstar: Lisa Zutz

Lisa Zutz is a volunteer at Children's.

Lisa Zutz is a volunteer at Children’s.

Lisa Zutz is an aspiring pediatric RN who currently works as a phlebotomist. She has volunteered on the inpatient units, in the sibling play area and, most recently, piloted a volunteer role in the lab, which has proved highly successful. What keeps Lisa coming back week after week? The positivity and bravery of our patients.

1. Why she rocks?

I got into volunteering because of its benefits; I believe that unpaid volunteers are kind of the “glue” that holds a community or even a hospital together. Volunteering makes me happy, and knowing that I am able to put a smile on a child’s face really makes my day. Volunteering at Children’s Hospital has brought so much fun and fulfillment to my life. I want to work as a nurse with children, and I feel that the skills I gain from volunteering will make me that much better of a nurse and a person.

2. What’s your favorite thing to do outside of volunteering?

Outside of volunteering, I keep pretty busy. I am very active and love to work out; whether it’s yoga, spin, or even a nice long run. Also, I spend a lot of time with my family.

3. Do you have any kids or pets of your own?

I do not have any kids, but once a week I babysit my two nieces, Chloe and Kinzi, ages 2 and 5. We have a blast together! I spend more time with my nieces than my actual friends. We enjoy going to the Maple Grove indoor maze, making cupcakes, playing outside and making projects. We definitely keep busy all day long. I also have a kitty. His name is Luigi, and I love him with all my heart. He is a beautiful mix: half-Siamese, half-Himalayan and loves to play and run around my condo.

Subscribe to Mighty4. If you could create a new candy bar, what would be in it and what would you name it?

I am not a lover of chocolate, but for everyone who is, I would make an ice cream bar loaded with caramel, pecans, rich chocolate and, of course, ice cream. I would call it “Caramel Delight,” and it would melt in your mouth!

5. Share a favorite volunteer experience or story.

I am not sure if I can choose a favorite; I believe every experience I have had at Children’s has made me into a better person. Each child is so different and unique that every experience has its own one-of-a-kind story. It is amazing to see how brave these kids truly are; they battle so hard and are so positive despite being sick. Life is so fragile, and when you see such young children sick, you realize how life should not be taken for granted. Volunteering is so rewarding!

Children’s represented at Family Advocacy Day in Washington

By Kelly Wolfe

In late June, Children’s participated in the Children’s Hospitals Association Family Advocacy Day.

The Christiansen family (Eleanor, Tyler, Greta and Wes) joined families from across the country to advocate for funding and programming for children’s hospitals and children with special health care needs. The Christiansen’s used their experience at Children’s to educate and inform our U.S. senators and representatives on Capitol Hill. We were lucky to have them represent us!

Kelly Wolfe is senior policy and advocacy specialist at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

Family Advocacy Day 2014 in Washington, D.C. from Children’s of Minnesota on Vimeo.

Photo diary of the trip:

The Christiansens get inspired in front of the U.S. Capitol for meetings on the Hill. The weather was warm and breezy; a perfect day for a lot of walking.

The Christiansens get inspired in front of the U.S. Capitol for meetings on the Hill. The weather was warm and breezy; a perfect day for a lot of walking.

Washington, D.C., is full of wonderful sightseeing opportunities. The Christiansen family takes advantage of some free time by visiting all of the monuments.

Washington, D.C., is full of wonderful sightseeing opportunities. The Christiansen family takes advantage of some free time by visiting all of the monuments.

The Christiansens visit "Honest Abe." The passion they have for advocating for child health almost equals the size of the Lincoln Memorial.

The Christiansens visit “Honest Abe.” The passion they have for advocating for child health almost equals the size of the Lincoln Memorial.

Future presidents? We hope so! Greta and Wes take their turns at the president’s desk at the White House Gift Shop.

Future presidents? We hope so! Greta and Wes take their turns at the president’s desk at the White House Gift Shop.

Greta and Wes certainly are out of this world! They had a great time checking out the astronauts at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum.

Greta and Wes certainly are out of this world! They had a great time checking out the astronauts at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum.

Batman flew by to say a special hello to Greta and Wes at the Family Advocacy Day Celebration dinner. Complete with a band, dancing, caricatures, face-painting, photo booths and games, the event gave families one last chance to exchange trading cards and have some fun before a full day of meetings on Capitol Hill.

Batman flew by to say a special hello to Greta and Wes at the Family Advocacy Day Celebration dinner. Complete with a band, dancing, caricatures, face-painting, photo booths and games, the event gave families one last chance to exchange trading cards and have some fun before a full day of meetings on Capitol Hill.

The Christiansens pose with Congressman Eric Paulsen under his Minnesota-made canoe.

The Christiansens pose with Congressman Eric Paulsen under his Minnesota-made canoe.

After a special breakfast of Minnesota Mahnomen porridge in U.S. Sen. Franken’s office, Greta cozied up next to him as he listened to the Christiansens' moving story. It’s not every day you get to sit on a U.S. senator’s couch.

After a special breakfast of Minnesota Mahnomen porridge in U.S. Sen. Franken’s office, Greta cozied up next to him as he listened to the Christiansens’ moving story. It’s not every day you get to sit on a U.S. senator’s couch.

Eleanor talks to Congressman Keith Ellison about the importance of funding programs like the Children’s Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGME) program, which provides funding to train future pediatricians and specialists like the ones that treated Greta.

Eleanor talks to Congressman Keith Ellison about the importance of funding programs like the Children’s Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGME) program, which provides funding to train future pediatricians and specialists like the ones that treated Greta.

Don’t forget kids in cars

Cracking a window does little to reduce the heat inside a car. Never leave your child unattended in the car. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Cracking a window does little to reduce the heat inside a car. Never leave your child unattended in the car. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Dex Tuttle

I’ve often surprised myself by how forgetful I am as a parent. It’s possible I’m the only dad who has nearly forgotten that his daughter needs to eat and, more specifically, that he’s responsible for making sure that happens. I know for a FACT, however, that I’m not the only dad who has forgotten the diaper bag in the car and been forced to speed-run the grocery shopping to get a stinky child out of the store as fast as possible. On tired days after sleepless nights, I’ve forgotten that my keys are in the ignition of the car I’m driving and seriously debated being late for work to turn around and go get them.

I’m exposing a vulnerable part of myself a little when I admit this type of fault, but I know I’m not alone. As the injury prevention program coordinator at Children’s, I feel even more responsible to be mistake-free in providing a safe environment for my child, and I feel that much more silly when I fail to do so.

Subscribe to MightyWhen Quinnlyn was learning to walk, she pulled herself up on me as I sat in my “dad chair” in the living room. (I’ll admit, realizing that the recliner was a crucial part of fatherhood was a huge part of my excitement for becoming a dad, but I digress.) She grabbed my hands and smiled at her accomplishment. After a few happy moments, she started to turn and walk away, and I forgot that she wasn’t yet able to stand on her own. I let go of her hands and down she went, flat on her back. Thankfully, she was OK. She actually laughed it off (her reaction to near-injury that would soon give me anxiety) and got herself back up.

So far, my follies have been rather benign. Still, I live in eternal fear of finding myself in that vulnerable, forgetful moment when something more serious happens.

As the summer ramps into full swing, one such mistake I’m determined NOT to make is forgetting Quinn in the car. This can happen for one of two reasons: we don’t realize the danger, or we find ourselves in a moment of distraction and leave out one very important detail.

Let me first convince you that this is extraordinarily dangerous:

  • Children have lower water reserves, so their body temperatures rise three to four times faster than an adult.
  • The temperature inside a car can rise 50-60 degrees Fahrenheit every 15 minutes (on a 70-degree day, the temperature inside a car can reach 116 degrees).
  • Since 1998, more than 580 children in the United States have died from being left in vehicles.
  • In car seats, children are insulated, making it more difficult for their bodies to regulate overheating.
  • Signs of hyperthermia set in when body temperature reaches just 100.9 degrees Fahrenheit, which children will surpass in only a matter of minutes; internal organs can begin to fail at 104 degrees, and death can occur when body temp reaches 107.
  • Cracking a window does little to reduce the heat inside a car.

On most days, strapping my daughter into her car seat easily could be the final challenge on a reality game show that tests strength, patience and fortitude. Therefore, I’m admittedly hesitant to take her in and out of the car more than I need. However, you never know what will happen; on an average day, there are so many things that are out of your control and could delay a quick stop or create catastrophic failure of your car’s air conditioning. Please take control of what you can and never, ever leave your child unattended in the car.

But as I’ve already admitted, I’m forgetful. Here are some tips on making sure you don’t forget your most-precious package:

  • Place an important item in the backseat. My recommendation is to leave your phone there – thus removing a major distraction while driving – but it can be a purse, wallet, computer, jacket or any other item you know you’ll need when you arrive at your destination.
  • If you don’t carry items often and you drive a car with an automatic transmission, take the shoe off the foot you don’t use for the pedals and put it in the back seat. This can be a fun game where everyone in the family participates.
  • Leave yourself a note on the dashboard: “BABY IN BACK!”
  • Put a stuffed animal or doll in the car seat when your child isn’t in it. When you strap your kid in for a trip, put the stuffed animal in the seat next to you up front – a reminder that something is out of place.
  • If you have a GPS-enabled device, set location reminders when arriving at your favorite locations – the grocery store, work, restaurants, etc. Kars 4 Kids is developing an app that works with your car’s Bluetooth capabilities to remind you as you walk away from the vehicle.

Make arrival habits:

  • Always do a walk-around of your vehicle to ensure you’re a safe distance from other hazards and make note of items that will help you remember where you parked.
  • Always use the passenger-side doors to load and unload for trips. This will force you to walk around the car to collect your items.
  • Make a game with your child where you always sing a song, say a phrase, do an activity each time you stop at a destination. Even if your child is sleeping, the habit will keep your mind thinking about the little person in the backseat.

Other resources:

Dex Tuttle is the injury prevention program coordinator at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

Five things to know about heat exhaustion

With sun and humidity a factor during summer in Minnesota, we thought it was a good time to talk about ways to keep kids safe in the heat. In addition to our quick tips for protecting your kids from dehydration, here are tips on avoiding heat exhaustion. We believe in Making Safe Simple, so take a few moments to review these tips!

  1. Subscribe to MightyChildren adjust more slowly than adults do to changes in environmental heat. They also produce more heat with activity than adults and sweat less. Sweating is one of the body’s normal cooling mechanisms. Children often don’t think to rest when having fun and may not drink enough fluids when playing or exercising.
  2. Heat exhaustion results from a loss of water and salt in the body due to excessive sweating. It occurs when the body is unable to cool itself properly and, if left untreated, can progress to heat stroke.
  3. Signs of heat exhaustion in children are: profuse sweating, pale skin that’s cool and damp to the touch, rapid and shallow breathing, headache, nausea, normal or below-normal body temperature, vomiting or diarrhea, dizziness, weakness or fainting, and muscle cramps.
  4. If your child is experiencing heat exhaustion, move him or her to a cool place right away to rest. You should remove extra clothing and apply cool cloths (towels with cold water) and fan the child’s skin. Give him or her cool sports drinks containing salt and sugar such as Gatorade (if the child doesn’t feel nauseated).
  5. Call your doctor or go to the emergency department if their condition hasn’t improved or your child is unable to take fluids within an hour.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.

Stay safe and avoid dehydration in hot weather

Follow these quick tips to keep your kids safe from dehydration when they’re out playing in hot temperatures.

Summertime is definitely here, and what kid can’t wait to get outside and play? But staying safe in the sun, and avoiding dehydration, is important.

Subscribe to MightyWe believe in Making Safe Simple. Here are some quick tips to help your kids avoid dehydration:

  • On hot days, make sure you drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. The human body requires at least one liter of water daily.
  • Dehydration means that a child’s body doesn’t have enough fluid. Dehydration can result from not drinking, vomiting, diarrhea, or any combination of these conditions. Sweating or urinating too much rarely causes it.
  • Thirst is not a good early indicator of dehydration. By the time a child feels thirsty, he or she may already be dehydrated. And thirst can be quenched before the necessary body fluids have been replaced.
  • Signs of dehydration in children include the following: sticky or dry mouth, few or no tears when crying, eyes that look sunken into the head, lack of urine or wet diapers for six to eight hours in an infant (or only a small amount of dark yellow urine), lack of urine for 12 hours in an older child (or only a small amount of dark yellow urine); dry, cool skin; irritability, and fatigue or dizziness in an older child.
  • If you suspect your child is dehydrated, start by replenishing his or her body with fluids. Plain water is the best option for the first hour or two. The child can drink as much as he or she wants. After this, the child might need drinks containing sugar and electrolytes (salts) or regular food. Also, the child should rest in a cool, shaded environment until the lost fluid has been replaced.
  • Call your doctor immediately or take your child to the nearest emergency department if there is no improvement or condition is worsening.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.