Category Archives: Featured

Wisconsin girl perseveres through cancer relapse

Reagan completed her initial treatment April 1.

Reagan Robertson, of Frederic, Wis., completed her initial treatment April 1.

Like most little girls, Reagan Robertson of Frederic, Wis., has a healthy list of her favorite things. Not surprisingly, Disney princesses and baby dolls rank high on her list. But you can also add dance parties, horses, puppies, kitties, fingernail polish and bike rides with her dad to that list.

A brave, sweet girl, Reagan already has been through a lot in her young life.

It was Oct. 17, 2013, when doctors first mentioned “leukemia” to her parents, Alison Lake and Allen Robertson. When a subsequent bone marrow biopsy didn’t confirm the disease, the Robertsons stayed in the hospital for eight days while the doctors tried to pinpoint her exact condition. Eventually, the Robertsons were sent home with “pre-leukemia” until Nov. 8, when acute myeloid leukemia was confirmed.

Subscribe to MightyReagan completed her initial treatment April 1 (four rounds of chemotherapy with each round averaging 25 days inpatient and 12 days at home). Then, on May 16, she relapsed. She had an additional two rounds of chemo. If these rounds of chemo put her into remission, she’ll be getting a bone marrow transplant, hopefully, this month.

Alison is appreciative of the care they receive from Dr. Jawhar Rawwas and the staff at Children’s.

“I feel like the oncology team cares for Reagan,” she said. “When she relapsed, they were upset for us. The doctors and nurses are very attentive and do a good job in every aspect of care.”

Reagan’s lengthy hospital stays have had an impact on her. Alison figures Reagan will be a nurse when she grows up since she regularly helps the nurses do vitals, does dressing changes on her stuffed animals and takes alcohol wipes and cleans the lines. She always helps flush her g-tube and even refers to herself as “baby nurse.”

Reagan is a fighter and up to the challenges ahead of her.

“When she’s feeling good and not in the hospital, she is an absolute joy to be around,” Alison said. “She’s so happy and smiling and funny. She can be a tad grumpy in the hospital and sometimes people don’t really get to see her true nature. She is our ‘Rea of Sunshine.’ ”

Break for breakfast: Tips for a healthy start

With the school under way, your child may be in a hurry to get ready in the morning – and that includes trying to fit in time to eat breakfast and pack a lunch.

Since diet plays a huge role in childhood obesity, it’s important to make sure a child is eating right even when you’re not there to supervise or cook. Four out of five kids from 12 to 19 years old have “poor diets” – high in salt and sugar-sweetened beverages and low in fruits, vegetables, fiber and lean protein.

In Minnesota, nearly one out of four kids has weight problems. Among Minnesota adolescents ages 10 to 17, about 11.1 percent are obese.

Subscribe to Mighty“Beginning your day with a healthy breakfast is a good way to wake up your body and brain,” said Julie Boman, MD, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

How do you make sure your child gets a healthy start? Boman weighs in with these four tips:

  1. Stock the cupboards and refrigerator with healthy choices. They can include whole grain cereal, fresh fruit, yogurt and eggs.
  2. Make it convenient. If you buy strawberries, wash and slice them up so they’re ready for your child to grab and go.
  3. Whenever possible, encourage your child to sit down and have breakfast.
  4. If your child is older, plan the menu for the week together.

Physical punishment of children not a long-term, healthy solution

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Alice Swenson, MD, is a child abuse pediatrician at the Midwest Children’s Resource Center, a clinic which is dedicated to the medical evaluation of suspected child abuse and neglect.

Alice Swenson, MD

Alice Swenson, MD

There has been much conversation in the media regarding corporal punishment and physical abuse of children. We at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota have an obligation to protect the health and safety of all children in our community and to respond to questions about discipline and abuse. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reaffirmed its statement on discipline in 2012. The statement concludes that the purpose of discipline is to “teach or instruct” a child to prepare him or her to “achieve competence, self-control, self-direction, and caring for others.”

And while physical punishment of a child may be immediately effective in stopping an unwanted behavior, it is less useful in the long term. Spanking or hitting a child “models aggressive behavior as a solution to conflict and has been associated with increased aggression” in children. In addition, parents who resort to physical discipline are more likely to escalate the severity of the punishment in order to continue to achieve the desired effect, resulting in serious injury and abuse. We share the position of the AAP, that physical punishment of a child is not the optimal approach to discipline.

Additional resources and information:

Elk River teen siblings share cancer stories

Siblings Aaron (left) and Abby Dwyer of Elk River were diagnosed with cancer four years apart.

Siblings Aaron (left) and Abby Dwyer of Elk River were diagnosed with cancer four years apart.

Abby Dwyer, who was featured at this year’s Pine Tree Apple Tennis Classic, is a wonderful young adult who faced cancer head-on after being diagnosed with Philadelphia chromosome positive ALL leukemia almost five years ago.

Abby has been off treatment for two years and is doing well after undergoing a double knee replacement when she was 14 because chemotherapy treatments destroyed her knees.

Abby, a sophomore at Elk River High School, where she plays the saxophone in the band, enjoys participating in pep rallies. She has one brother, Aaron, who later was diagnosed with cancer, and one sister, Allison. Her parents are Tim and Terri Dwyer.

“The staff at Children’s – Minneapolis have been amazing with her treatment,” Terri said. “It is because of Dr. Joanna Perkins, her primary doctor; Dr. Bruce Bostrom and many others that we have our Abby here today with us. Abby’s treatment was very intense for 20 months. We are so grateful for the support and care that the nurses in the hospital and in clinic have given to Abby.”

Abby’s favorite nurse at Children’s was Erin Ryan, RN, because she showed so much compassion to Abby during her difficult treatment. Abby is quick to note that there were many nurses that impacted her care and made her many nights in the hospital more bearable and fun.

Abby loves the outdoors, especially mountains, and to attend camps, which she has done three times this summer.

Spend time with Abby and you’ll see that she is a kind and independent person who loves to be around children. She’s always looking out for others and offering of herself with her servant’s heart. She loves to hang out with friends, play games and watch TV. Abby has an infectious laugh and positive attitude that follow her.

Abby wants to be a nurse or a child life specialist in the future as a way to give back to her community for all of the things that were given to her.

Subscribe to MightyAfter watching sister battle cancer, Aaron Dwyer faces fight of his own

Aaron Dwyer, who saw his sister, Abby, battle cancer, was diagnosed with stage 3 T-cell lymphoma on Dec. 13, 2013, four years after his sister’s cancer diagnosis.

Aaron has 1½ years of treatment remaining. In spite of it being a tough road, he has handled it well by trying to stay positive and keep his faith.

“The Children’s staff has been amazing to Aaron. They welcomed him in and have taken incredible care of him during his treatment,” his mother, Terri Dwyer, said. Aaron’s primary doctor, Joanna Perkins, MD, was there for Abby’s treatment, too. “Aaron has had a couple tough points in his treatment, but the staff stepped in and truly gave Aaron the support and encouragement he needed. We could not have made it through it all without the caring team at Children’s.”

The Elk River High School senior plays the trumpet in the band and two jazz bands.

When pressed, Aaron admitted that two nurses are his favorite. John is his favorite nurse at clinic because the two share many of the same interests, and Leah is his favorite nurse in the hospital because she always makes him laugh and they joke around, which makes his stays a bit more bearable.

Aaron wants to go into the banking as a career. He’s already had a taste of it at his job as a bank teller, and he enjoys it.

Outside of work and school, Aaron is busy. He likes to spend his free time cooking new and delicious recipes. He also enjoys hanging out with friends and playing games, riding four-wheelers, running and spending time at home. But that’s not all. He also enjoys playing piano, listening to country music, hunting, target practice, camping with his family and hiking.

Like his sisters, Abby and Allison, Aaron is a kind and giving person who always has a smile on his face. He’s a hard worker with a great attitude about life and a great sense of humor.

Participate in #FighttheFluMN photo challenge

flu_prevention_kohls_600x600_4Flu season is just around the corner here in Minnesota and across the country. The Kohl’s Cares and Children’s Flu Prevention Project wants to know how you and your family plan to fight the flu this year. You’re invited to participate in the Flu Prevention Photo Challenge to show us how.

photoHere’s how to participate:

1. Snap a photo of you and/or your family fighting the flu.

Examples include:

  • Getting a flu vaccine
  • Washing your hands
  • Covering your cough
  • Showing off your “I got vaccinated” sticker

2. Post your photo on Twitter or Instagram using #FighttheFluMN (not case sensitive).

The contest runs until Wednesday (Sept. 17). Submit as many photos as you’d like. At the end of the day Wednesday, we’ll choose, at random, five people who each will receive a $50 Kohl’s gift card. Good luck and happy snapping!

Contest rules: Only photos posted by persons 18 years of age or older are eligible.

Social media disclaimer: We welcome and encourage open discussion on Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota’s (Children’s) social media sites  including but not limited to our blogs, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube pages and online story-sharing forums  and look forward to any comments, stories and experiences you want to share. Other than the entries Children’s posts ourselves, the opinions and/or views expressed on these sites represent the thoughts of individual bloggers and online communities, and not those necessarily of Children’s or any of our directors, officers, employees, research staff, medical staff or members of our board of directors. All links to other websites found linked from Children’s social media sites are provided as a service to readers, but such linkage does not constitute endorsement of those sites by Children’s, and as such we are not responsible for the content of external websites.

While Children’s makes reasonable efforts to monitor and/or moderate content posted on our social media sites, we do not moderate all comments and cannot always respond in a timely manner to online requests for information. Children’s reserves the sole right to review, edit and/or delete any comments it deems are inappropriate. Comments including, but not limited to, the following may be deleted or edited by Children’s:

  • Abusive or hurtful comments about a blogger or another participant
  • Off-topic and redundant comments (this includes promotion of events, groups, pages, Web sites, organizations and programs not related to or affiliated with Children’s)
  • Comments that use foul language or “hate speech” (e.g., racial, ethnic or gender bashing language)
  • Personal attacks or defamatory statements or comments about a participant, instead of just criticizing his/her posting, opinion or comments
  • Comments that violate the privacy of our patients and their families

Please remember that information posted on any of our social media sites shouldn’t be considered medical advice and shouldn’t replace a consultation with a health care professional.

Please be aware that once you post something online, there’s the potential for thousands (or hundreds of thousands) of people to read your words, even years from now. We therefore suggest that you exercise caution when posting medical information on any of our social media sites and that you not disclose personal identifiable information like your location, medical record number, financial information, etc.

By submitting content to any of Children’s social media sites, you understand and acknowledge that this information is available to the public, and that Children’s may use this information for internal and external promotional purposes and fundraising purposes. Please note that other participants may use your posted information beyond the control of Children’s. If you do not wish to have the information you have made available via this site used, published, copied and/or reprinted, please do not post on this page.

Fight the flu, we challenge you

flu_prevention_kohls_600x600_4photo 1Flu season is just around the corner here in Minnesota and across the country. The Kohl’s Cares and Children’s Flu Prevention Project wants to know how you and your family plan to fight the flu this year. Participating Kohl’s stores (Roseville, Owatonna, Mankato, Blaine, Maplewood and St. Cloud) will be holding two clinics from 4-8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13.

You are invited to participate in the Flu Prevention Photo Challenge to show us how.

Here’s how to participate:

1. Snap a photo of you and/or your family fighting the flu.

Examples include:

  • Getting a flu vaccine
  • Washing your hands
  • photo 2Covering your cough
  • Showing off your “I got vaccinated” sticker

2. Post your photo on Twitter or Instagram using #FighttheFluMN (not case sensitive)

The contest will run from Sept. 12-17. During that time, we encourage you to submit as many photos as you like. At the end of the day on Sept. 17, we will choose, at random, five people who each will receive a $50 Kohl’s gift card. Good luck and happy snapping!

Contest rules: Only photos posted by persons 18 years of age or older are eligible.

Social media disclaimer: We welcome and encourage open discussion on Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota’s (Children’s) social media sites  including but not limited to our blogs, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube pages and online story-sharing forums  and look forward to any comments, stories and experiences you want to share. Other than the entries Children’s posts ourselves, the opinions and/or views expressed on these sites represent the thoughts of individual bloggers and online communities, and not those necessarily of Children’s or any of our directors, officers, employees, research staff, medical staff or members of our board of directors. All links to other websites found linked from Children’s social media sites are provided as a service to readers, but such linkage does not constitute endorsement of those sites by Children’s, and as such we are not responsible for the content of external websites.

While Children’s makes reasonable efforts to monitor and/or moderate content posted on our social media sites, we do not moderate all comments and cannot always respond in a timely manner to online requests for information. Children’s reserves the sole right to review, edit and/or delete any comments it deems are inappropriate. Comments including, but not limited to, the following may be deleted or edited by Children’s:

  • Abusive or hurtful comments about a blogger or another participant
  • Off-topic and redundant comments (this includes promotion of events, groups, pages, Web sites, organizations and programs not related to or affiliated with Children’s)
  • Comments that use foul language or “hate speech” (e.g., racial, ethnic or gender bashing language)
  • Personal attacks or defamatory statements or comments about a participant, instead of just criticizing his/her posting, opinion or comments
  • Comments that violate the privacy of our patients and their families

Please remember that information posted on any of our social media sites shouldn’t be considered medical advice and shouldn’t replace a consultation with a health care professional.

Please be aware that once you post something online, there’s the potential for thousands (or hundreds of thousands) of people to read your words, even years from now. We therefore suggest that you exercise caution when posting medical information on any of our social media sites and that you not disclose personal identifiable information like your location, medical record number, financial information, etc.

By submitting content to any of Children’s social media sites, you understand and acknowledge that this information is available to the public, and that Children’s may use this information for internal and external promotional purposes and fundraising purposes. Please note that other participants may use your posted information beyond the control of Children’s. If you do not wish to have the information you have made available via this site used, published, copied and/or reprinted, please do not post on this page.

Define safe boundaries for kids and play

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Dex Tuttle

Not long ago, I watched my toddler daughter, Quinnlyn, as she played with her favorite blocks. She picked one up, stacked it carefully on top of another, and repeated until she had a tower four or five blocks high. Without warning, she pummeled the tower while sounding her signature high-pitched battle cry, sending blocks flying in all directions. She immediately seemed to regret not having a tower and ran to pick up the blocks to start the process over.

Young children begin to understand their world by cause-and-effect experimentation. Psychologist Jean Piaget was one of the first to put this concept into organized thought.

This behavior is apparent with my daughter: “If I stick my hand in the dog’s water dish, my shirt gets wet. This pleases me and I must do this each morning, preferably after mommy helps me put on a clean shirt.”

Then, something occurred to me as I watched Quinnlyn build and destroy her tower; there is a trigger missing in her young mind that could change her behavior: She does not understand consequence, the indirect product of an effect.

I began to notice this in her other activities as well. At dinnertime, we give her a plastic fork and spoon so she can work on her motor skills. If she’s unhappy with how dinner is going, she throws her fork and spoon on the floor in a fit of toddler rage. She is then immediately puzzled by how she’ll continue her meal now that her utensils are so far away.

Subscribe to MightyAs frustrating as toddler tantrums can sometimes be for parents, I’d love to be in my daughter’s shoes. Who wouldn’t want the satisfaction of taking all those dirty dishes that have been in the sink for two days and chucking them against the wall? That decision, of course, would be dangerous and reckless and I have no desire to clean up such a mess. And, with no dishes in the house, I’d be forced to take a toddler to the store to shop for breakable things; not a winning combination.

There’s an important lesson here for safety-minded parents: Kids will explore their environment in whatever way they can. It’s like the feeling you get when you find a $20 bill in the pocket of a pair of pants you haven’t worn in months, or when you discover the newest tool, gadget or fashion. For toddlers (and us adults), it’s fun finding new things and learning new skills; it’s motivating and creates a feeling of accomplishment. However, the cognitive skills of a toddler haven’t developed beyond that cause-effect understanding.

This is why we need to consider the environment in which our young children play. I recommend giving them plenty of space and opportunity to experiment without worry of the consequence:

  • Make sure stairs are blocked off securely and unsafe climbing hazards are eliminated; encourage kids to explore the space you define.
  • Create a space to explore free of choking hazards, potential poisons and breakable or valuable items; leave plenty of new objects for children to discover, and change the objects out when the kids seem to grow tired of them.
  • Allow children to fail at certain tasks; be encouraging and positive without intervening as they try again.
  • If possible, discuss their actions and consequences with them to help them understand the reason for your rules.

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. When it’s critical, so is your choice – Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

Dex Tuttle is the injury prevention program coordinator at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and the father of a curious and mobile toddler. He has a Master of Education degree from Penn State University.

Five Question Friday: Terrance Davis

Five Question FridayIt’s Friday, and what better way to celebrate the end of the week than with a Five Question Friday profile? Meet Terrance Davis, who works on our Environmental Services team within the Minneapolis Surgery department.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children's for 25 years.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children’s for 25 years.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked here for 25 years.

Describe your role.

I clean surgery rooms between cases and stock supplies.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

I have a few favorites:

  • The surgery staff surprised me with a 50th birthday celebration.
  • Each annual craft show, which is so much fun
  • Gathering for the Environmental Services Week events

What do you think make kids great?

I have a couple answers for this one. First, they can smile at you and make your entire day better. Second, they have great energy, which can be contagious.

What is one interesting fact about you?

I was married in Las Vegas at the top of the Stratosphere tower with local TV personality “Fancy Ray” McCloney standing with me as my best man.

Five Question Friday: Kelly Patnode

Five Question Friday

Meet Kelly Patnode, patient access specialist at our St. Paul hospital, who has a love for the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn't working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn’t working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s in St. Paul for 36 years.

What drew you to Children’s?

I started in St. Paul when it was on “the hill” (across the highway from our current location) as a volunteer at the age of 13. I was a volunteer for four years. I went to school for medical office occupations, but there were no openings at that time. When I was talking to someone at Children’s, they said there was an opening for a health unit coordinator. I asked what that person did, and they explained that person works at the main desk on the floors. I asked if that was similar to a ward secretary, and they said yes. I said, “Well, I have done that job for four years, so I think I could do it!”

Subscribe to MightyWhat is a typical day like for you?

My typical day starts with making a coffee. It is just the right way to start of the day. I then clean and restart all the computers, restock supplies and then either sit at the emergency room desk and start answering the phone, make calls for the providers, put together a chart or break down a chart or start with registering patients who come to be seen in the ER.

What do you love most about your job?

Every day is a different day. What I did yesterday at my job may be totally different than the day before or today. If I can get a smile out of a patient and their parents, it just makes the day better.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

Usually I read books. But during the summertime I am busy because I also work at the Minnesota State Fair, selling box-office tickets for grandstand shows and pre-fair tickets. I have been working there for 38 years. So when I am not working at the hospital, I am at the fair. I am actually taking vacation from the hospital to work full time at the fair this year.

Children’s, Twin Cities Moms Blog host #MNvaxchat

Subscribe to MightyAugust is National Immunization Awareness Month, and Minnesota’s new immunization requirements take effect Sept. 1. With that and back-to-school mode under way, we’ll be co-hosting a Twitter chat with our friends at Twin Cities Moms Blog.

Join us for the live chat, using #MNvaxchat from 8-9 p.m. Monday, that will feature Patsy Stinchfield, PNP, director of Infection Prevention and Control and the Children’s Immunization Project at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. Children’s and Twin Cities Moms Blog will be there, too. Participants who use #MNvaxchat in tweets during the live chat qualify for a chance to win a $50 Target gift card.

ALSO: Read the Children’s vaccinations blog archive on Mighty.

UPDATE: Participation strong, informative on #MNvaxchat