Category Archives: Featured

Meet a familiar face from Children’s

five_question_friday111If you’ve visited Starz Café at Children’s – Minneapolis, there’s a good chance you’ve seen Latisa Tyus. She and her smile are a Starz staple. Get to know Latisa in this edition of Five Question Friday.

Latisa Tyus has been with Children's for 17 years.

Latisa Tyus has been with Children’s for 17 years.

What is your title? Describe your role.

I’m a dietary aide in Nutrition Services. Currently I work as the cashier in Starz Café.  I ring up customers, set up food and beverages and clean the tables in the café.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s for 17 years.

What do you love most about your job?

The thing I love most of all is putting a smile on people’s faces when they are having a tough day. Whether it’s a patient’s family, staff or a visitor, I love being able to make people smile.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

subscribe_blogI remember when I started here and had been here only three days. Christine from the lab came in to collect a prize from the café, and I told her I was new and had to find someone to give her the prize. She was just so nice to me, and I still remember what she was wearing. To this day we still talk about how nice it is to work in such a great community here at Children’s.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I enjoy spending time with my family and friends. I love going to sporting events and love watching them on TV. I enjoy reading thriller books and am a music fanatic. I especially like music from the ’70s-’90s.

Mindfulness a technique to relieve stress

Many teachers of mindfulness suggest visualizing thoughts as leaves floating down a stream or as clouds drifting by in the sky. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

subscribe_blogLeslie Partin

Whether you’re a busy, working parent or a teen trying to balance a full social calendar and school, life can be stressful at times. Mindfulness, otherwise known as mindful meditation or mindfulness-based stress reduction (MSBR), is a tool any one of us can use as we navigate through the demands of our days.

The basic tenet of mindfulness is paying attention to the present moment. So much of the time we’re thinking ahead to the next task or mulling over something that happened in the past. For example, have you ever driven past the exit you intended to take, only to realize you missed it because you were thinking of something else? When we are caught up in our thoughts, we miss what is happening around us like that missed freeway exit.

Our minds are powerful, and we can harness that power to help us manage difficult experiences and distressing (or afflictive) emotions. When we are in the midst of a strong emotion or physical sensation like anger, sadness, disappointment or physical pain, it can feel like things will never get better. But if we’re able to step back and observe our distress, we may notice that it changes, ebbs and flows. Noticing and recognizing that the intensity varies, whether it’s an emotion or physical sensation, offers hope and reassurance that it won’t always be so hard. And when we focus on what we’re experiencing right now, instead of what’s going to happen — “I don’t want to have a headache at the dance,” “I don’t want to be stressed out at my child’s game,” etc. — then we don’t add the additional suffering of anticipation or worry. We suffer when we focus too much attention on what may happen in the future.

Mindfulness doesn’t mean trying not to think or making one’s mind blank. Instead, mindfulness teaches us to watch our thoughts, observe them while not attaching to them. Many teachers suggest visualizing thoughts as leaves floating down a stream or as clouds drifting by in the sky. Practitioners of meditation say that having a regular “practice” — a time set aside to practice meditation — allows us to develop our capability to be mindful in times of distress. It’s like building our mental muscles in the same way we build physical muscles by lifting weights or working out. Committing to a meditation or mindfulness practice helps us develop those muscles so we have the ability to use them when we need them most.

Neuroscience studies show us that the brain develops neuro-pathways as a result of our thinking habits and patterns. Similar to the way a trail through the woods is developed by animals and people following the same path over and over, our neuro-pathways, or thought habits, are made as we repeatedly take the same path of worry, fear, joy, happiness, etc. Mindfulness is one technique we can use to help form new neuro-pathways or mental habits. When we practice mindfulness we increase awareness of all of our thoughts and emotions, the positive as well as the afflictive ones. We then can choose which thoughts, emotions and sensations we want to focus on and nurture, and of which ones we want to let go. Remembering that we have this choice can help us cope when we hit stressful times.

If you’re interested in learning more about mindfulness, here are few links that can help you and your family get started (the first six links are centers that are located in the Twin Cities):

The Kiran Stordalen and Horst Rechelbacher Pediatric Pain, Palliative and Integrative Medicine Clinic at Children’s – Minneapolis has medical providers that work with children to teach relaxation techniques that can include the use of mindfulness. These strategies are helpful for chronic conditions such headaches and abdominal pain or problems with sleep and anxiety.


[1] Jon Kabat-Zinn developed Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction programs in Massachusetts and has several books and CDs, which provide a good starting point. “Everyday Blessings” is his book on mindful parenting, with Myla Kabat-Zinn.

Leslie Partin is a social worker at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

Wisconsin boy overcomes tumor inside heart

Doctors discovered a tumor inside the heart of Cole Eckes, 4, of Hayward, Wis., when he was an infant. (Photos courtesy of Kylah Eckes)

Doctors discovered a tumor inside the heart of Cole Eckes, 4, of Hayward, Wis., when he was an infant. (Photos courtesy of Kylah Eckes)

Kylah Eckes

Three-year-old Tara was excited to become a big sister. Cole was perfect when he was born; he had beautiful skin, bright eyes, and long fingers and toes.

He was perfect.

Little did we know, there was something imperfect about our baby boy.

When Cole was 12 weeks old, he had a funky cough, so I brought him to Essentia Health-Hayward (Wis.) Clinic to see our family physician. After reviewing the symptoms, our doctor ordered a chest X-ray to determine the problem. Of course, I cringed at the thought of my baby having pneumonia. Cole also had mild pectus excavatum — a sunken-in chest — so an X-ray would help monitor, too.

As I left the clinic, I told the receptionist that I was worried about pneumonia. In hindsight, we would have given anything for the diagnosis to have been pneumonia.

We spent most of the next 12 days at Children’s – Minneapolis, meeting people with titles we didn’t know existed. We waited for an official diagnosis and to meet someone who knew what to do. Cole underwent all kinds of tests, imaging and exams. Ultimately, the diagnosis was cardiac fibroma, a rare tumor of the heart. One day during morning rounds, we heard one of the cardiologists tell the other specialists that the main potential side effect of the mass is “sudden death.” Those words still ring loudly in my ear. Cole is only the 21st living case of this type of tumor, so there wasn’t much data to help lead the specialists. The surgeons didn’t want to perform surgery to remove the mass because of its large size — same size as his heart — and location — inside the back wall of the left ventricle. Surgery was too risky, and the tumor wasn’t impeding on the functions of the heart, so we just had to “keep an eye on it.”

Cole had surgery Feb. 8, 2011.

Cole had heart surgery Feb. 8, 2011.

At Children’s – Minneapolis, my husband, Zac, and I learned infant CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). We received two AEDs but were terrified to bring Cole home, an uncomfortable three hours away.

Over the next five months, every nap that lasted a bit longer than normal sent my mind racing; I was scared to go in and check on Cole. During that period, we gave Cole antiarrhythmic medication every six hours and saw his electrophysiologist, Dr. Chris Carter, regularly.

On Dec. 26, 2010, when Cole was 7 months old, he experienced ventricular fibrillation, a rapid heartbeat, at home. Zac administered CPR and used our AED to put Cole’s heart back into normal rhythm. Cole was flown to Children’s that night.

He went into v-fib, again, four days later.

“Dr. Blue, fourth floor, CVCC,” the voice over the intercom said.

That was a call for our son. The staff at Children’s seemed to come out of everywhere, flooding Cole’s room with the best team for which parents could ask. Zac and I stood in the hall as they worked on Cole for 55 minutes. One of the intensivists informed us that it was time for us to make a decision: ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), a type of life support; or end resuscitation. No one knew how Cole would respond to ECMO. There was no guarantee Cole would survive, and, if he did, everyone was unsure about the status of his cognitive functions. We couldn’t give up on him, so we chose ECMO.

For four days, Zac and I watched the staff care for Cole. All we could do was kiss his cold forehead and hold his cold little hand. Cole slowly was weaned off of ECMO, although it was discovered that he suffered numerous strokes and bleeding in the brain.

It was obvious that something needed to be done about the tumor. Surgery was scheduled for Feb. 8, 2011, Tara’s fourth birthday.

Life was an absolute roller coaster, but one thing remained constant: the care Cole received from the staff at Children’s. These people became like family to us. We trusted them to care for our son, and they did so with evident care and dedication. They were with us for the highest of highs and the lowest of lows. They stood by our sides when we looked at Cole lying in his hospital bed. We truly felt Cole was in the best hands when we went to the Ronald McDonald House, one floor below Cole’s bed, every morning for breakfast. This is where we spent time with Tara when she came to visit us with other family members.

I remember numerous conversations with doctors that put my mind at ease. I sat for nearly two hours on Cole’s couch, talking to one of the intensivists. She was able to help me understand what was happening.

Kylah and Zac Eckes with children Cole and Tara

Kylah and Zac Eckes with children Cole and Tara

On the morning of Cole’s surgery, we said goodbye to him because no one knew if he would survive surgery. Would his heart be able to function without the tumor? A large group of family members sat with us in the waiting room for eight hours. We received periodic updates from staff we had gotten to know well.

Dr. David Overman walked down the hall a little past 6 p.m. to deliver the most amazing news we could have heard: Cole made it through surgery. Not only did he survive, but he didn’t need the help of ECMO, which was a possibility had he made it through surgery.

Although surgery was over and the tumor removal was successfully, Cole wasn’t out of the woods. The next 12 hours were critical. Nurses spent the night stripping Cole’s tubes to make sure there were no blood clots; their dedication was remarkable. They weren’t just doing their jobs; they were helping a baby they cared about.

We were on our way home 10 days later. Walking out of the doors to the cardiovascular care center was bittersweet. We said goodbye to people who came to mean a great deal to us and thanked them over and over for all of the amazing things they did for Cole and our family even though “thank you” wasn’t nearly big enough to show our appreciation.

Today, Cole is 4 and in preschool, getting ready for kindergarten in the fall. He continues to beat the odds. He has fun playing with Tara and his little sister, Ayda. He loves to golf and is looking forward to start logrolling this summer. He still has an internal cardiac defibrillator (ICD) that was placed during the early part of his stay at Children’s. The ICD continuously monitors his heart rhythms and would deliver a shock if his heart were to have another episode, but we’re hopeful and optimistic that Cole will never need that type of intervention again.

Cole

From left: Siblings Tara, Ayda and Cole Eckes

subscribe_blogTara, now 8, participates in Jump Rope For Heart at her school. The annual event raises money for the American Heart Association. She raised more than $2,500 at last year’s event. She tells people about the importance of helping others and paying it forward because so many people helped us when we needed it. Her dedication to helping others landed her on the cover of Time For Kids magazine.

Cole sees his team at Children’s Heart Clinic every six months for checkups. We look forward to these visits to hear good news and to show everyone how far Cole has come. We repeatedly have heard from various staff members that Cole is a reminder to them of why they do what they do.

What you may not know about eating disorders

You may think you know a lot about eating disorders — that they’re caused by the social pressure to look like models, or that they’re all about weight loss and excessive exercise — but there’s more than meets the eye when it comes to identifying and treating these serious conditions.

In recognition of National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, our team from Children’s Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders clears up some common misconceptions about anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder as well as provides signs that may indicate that your child or teen is suffering from an eating disorder.

Full recovery can take months or years but is possible. Many individuals go on to be free from their eating disorder, while others may have residual symptoms or remain at risk for relapse. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Myth No. 1: People choose to have this illness.

Eating disorders develop as a result of complex genetic, psychological, social or environmental factors. They’re serious and potentially life threatening, and serious physiological (e.g., cardiac arrhythmias, kidney failure, death) and psychiatric (e.g., depression, substance abuse, suicidality) costs can accrue. In fact, among mental health diagnoses, eating disorders have the highest mortality rate. Someone doesn’t choose to have an eating disorder, just as people don’t choose to have cancer.

Myth No. 2: Eating disorders are caused by families.

Families do NOT cause eating disorders. This is a common myth that must be emphasized. There is no evidence showing that parenting styles or family dynamics play a role in the onset of eating disorders. Eating disorders can affect anyone.

Myth No. 3: Eating disorders are all about food.

Extreme or unhealthy dieting behaviors are associated with eating disorders, but eating disorders simply are not about food or controlling eating. In fact, people with eating disorders may either have a false sense of or complete loss of control over their eating. The core features of eating disorders are theorized to be the over-evaluation of weight and shape.

Myth No. 4: Only females are affected by eating disorders.

Eating disorders can affect anyone, males or females, across all cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, and among all age groups ranging from young children to the elderly. However, eating disorders predominantly target females and typically strike during adolescence and young adulthood.

Myth No. 5: You have to be thin to have an eating disorder.

It is impossible to know whether a person has an eating disorder just by looking at him or her, as people with eating disorders can appear thin, normal weight or overweight. Regardless of how a person appears or how much a person weighs, he or she might have an eating disorder and be engaging in harmful eating disorder behaviors.

Myth No. 6: People with an eating disorder can change but choose not to.

Although people with eating disorders may resist treatment or push family or friends away if they try to help, this is just a symptom of his or her illness. They also cannot choose to “just eat.” Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses that require professional treatment. The sooner a person with an eating disorder gets help, the better his or her chances are of recovering. Fortunately, we have effective therapies to treat eating disorders. At Children’s Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders, our clinicians are trained and have experience in delivery of these evidence-based treatments.

Myth No. 7: Once someone is treated for an eating disorder, he or she is cured for life.

Full recovery can take months or years but is possible. Many individuals go on to be free from their eating disorder, while others may have residual symptoms or remain at risk for relapse.

How to recognize an eating disorder

As illustrated above, eating disorders are complex. They may begin with a well-intended attempt to “get healthy” or “eat healthier.” Eating disorders also may look different for each child or adolescent. Some of the following may be warning signs that your child or adolescent is developing or has developed an eating disorder.

subscribe_blogPhysical signs:

  • Rapid or excessive weight loss
  • Dramatic weight gain
  • Development of fine facial or body hair
  • Lack of energy
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Feeling or complaining of being cold
  • Constipation
  • Vomiting
  • Dry skin
  • Hair loss
  • Dental erosion
  • Calluses on knuckles from self-induced vomiting
  • Decreased heart rate
  • Absent or irregular menstruation in females

 Cognitive signs:

  • Belief that he or she is “fat”
  • Afraid of gaining weight or becoming fat
  • Afraid of being able to stop eating
  • Denies having a problem or an eating disorder
  • Obsesses about body image, appearance or clothing
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Depression or withdrawal
  • Irritability
  • Self-worth appears strongly related to weight or shape
  • Obsessiveness 

Behavioral signs:

  • Refuses to eat normal types or amounts of food
  • Eats large amounts of food in a short period of time (binge-eating)
  • Self-induces vomiting
  • Over-exercising
  • Takes laxatives or diet pills
  • Hoarding, hiding or throwing away food
  • Engages in food rituals or has food rules, including calorie limits, measuring food or rules about what he or she should or shouldn’t eat
  • Categorizes food into “good” and “bad”
  • Refuses to eat “unhealthy” or “bad” foods
  • Eats only certain foods or only eats at specified times
  • Often says “I’m not hungry”
  • Makes excuses to avoid eating at mealtimes
  • Withdrawal from friends or activities
  • Eating in secret so that you are not aware of what he or she is eating

If you suspect that your child has an eating disorder or you have noticed some of these symptoms, it’s important to seek professional help as soon as possible. Trust your instincts as parents. Don’t wait until things get worse.

We encourage you to educate yourself and ask questions. We also encourage you to contact the Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders at Children’s to schedule an appointment for your child to have a thorough evaluation and to explore treatment options. Contact us at (612) 813-7179.

Meet Katie

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program.

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program.

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: Katie

Age: 5

Hometown: Eden Prairie

Katie was rushed from Abbott Northwestern Hospital to Children’s after she was born 15 weeks early. She only weighed a pound and had to stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for 99 days. According to her mom, she is now happy, healthy and doing wonderfully.

When Katie grows up, she wants to be a dancer. She loves to dance.

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program. Her brother, a member of our Youth Advisory Council (YAC), even helped to design a music cart for the music therapists at Children’s.

Define safe boundaries for kids and play

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Dex Tuttle

Not long ago, I watched my toddler daughter, Quinnlyn, as she played with her favorite blocks. She picked one up, stacked it carefully on top of another, and repeated until she had a tower four or five blocks high. Without warning, she pummeled the tower while sounding her signature high-pitched battle cry, sending blocks flying in all directions. She immediately seemed to regret not having a tower and ran to pick up the blocks to start the process over.

Young children begin to understand their world by cause-and-effect experimentation. Psychologist Jean Piaget was one of the first to put this concept into organized thought.

This behavior is apparent with my daughter: “If I stick my hand in the dog’s water dish, my shirt gets wet. This pleases me and I must do this each morning, preferably after mommy helps me put on a clean shirt.”

Then, something occurred to me as I watched Quinnlyn build and destroy her tower; there is a trigger missing in her young mind that could change her behavior: She does not understand consequence, the indirect product of an effect.

I began to notice this in her other activities as well. At dinnertime, we give her a plastic fork and spoon so she can work on her motor skills. If she’s unhappy with how dinner is going, she throws her fork and spoon on the floor in a fit of toddler rage. She is then immediately puzzled by how she’ll continue her meal now that her utensils are so far away.

Subscribe to MightyAs frustrating as toddler tantrums can sometimes be for parents, I’d love to be in my daughter’s shoes. Who wouldn’t want the satisfaction of taking all those dirty dishes that have been in the sink for two days and chucking them against the wall? That decision, of course, would be dangerous and reckless and I have no desire to clean up such a mess. And, with no dishes in the house, I’d be forced to take a toddler to the store to shop for breakable things; not a winning combination.

There’s an important lesson here for safety-minded parents: Kids will explore their environment in whatever way they can. It’s like the feeling you get when you find a $20 bill in the pocket of a pair of pants you haven’t worn in months, or when you discover the newest tool, gadget or fashion. For toddlers (and us adults), it’s fun finding new things and learning new skills; it’s motivating and creates a feeling of accomplishment. However, the cognitive skills of a toddler haven’t developed beyond that cause-effect understanding.

This is why we need to consider the environment in which our young children play. I recommend giving them plenty of space and opportunity to experiment without worry of the consequence:

  • Make sure stairs are blocked off securely and unsafe climbing hazards are eliminated; encourage kids to explore the space you define.
  • Create a space to explore free of choking hazards, potential poisons and breakable or valuable items; leave plenty of new objects for children to discover, and change the objects out when the kids seem to grow tired of them.
  • Allow children to fail at certain tasks; be encouraging and positive without intervening as they try again.
  • If possible, discuss their actions and consequences with them to help them understand the reason for your rules.

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. When it’s critical, so is your choice – Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

Dex Tuttle is the injury prevention program coordinator at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and the father of a curious and mobile toddler. He has a Master of Education degree from Penn State University.

Five Question Friday: Terrance Davis

Five Question FridayIt’s Friday, and what better way to celebrate the end of the week than with a Five Question Friday profile? Meet Terrance Davis, who works on our Environmental Services team within the Minneapolis Surgery department.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children's for 25 years.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children’s for 25 years.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked here for 25 years.

Describe your role.

I clean surgery rooms between cases and stock supplies.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

I have a few favorites:

  • The surgery staff surprised me with a 50th birthday celebration.
  • Each annual craft show, which is so much fun
  • Gathering for the Environmental Services Week events

What do you think make kids great?

I have a couple answers for this one. First, they can smile at you and make your entire day better. Second, they have great energy, which can be contagious.

What is one interesting fact about you?

I was married in Las Vegas at the top of the Stratosphere tower with local TV personality “Fancy Ray” McCloney standing with me as my best man.

Five Question Friday: Kelly Patnode

Five Question Friday

Meet Kelly Patnode, patient access specialist at our St. Paul hospital, who has a love for the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn't working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn’t working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s in St. Paul for 36 years.

What drew you to Children’s?

I started in St. Paul when it was on “the hill” (across the highway from our current location) as a volunteer at the age of 13. I was a volunteer for four years. I went to school for medical office occupations, but there were no openings at that time. When I was talking to someone at Children’s, they said there was an opening for a health unit coordinator. I asked what that person did, and they explained that person works at the main desk on the floors. I asked if that was similar to a ward secretary, and they said yes. I said, “Well, I have done that job for four years, so I think I could do it!”

Subscribe to MightyWhat is a typical day like for you?

My typical day starts with making a coffee. It is just the right way to start of the day. I then clean and restart all the computers, restock supplies and then either sit at the emergency room desk and start answering the phone, make calls for the providers, put together a chart or break down a chart or start with registering patients who come to be seen in the ER.

What do you love most about your job?

Every day is a different day. What I did yesterday at my job may be totally different than the day before or today. If I can get a smile out of a patient and their parents, it just makes the day better.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

Usually I read books. But during the summertime I am busy because I also work at the Minnesota State Fair, selling box-office tickets for grandstand shows and pre-fair tickets. I have been working there for 38 years. So when I am not working at the hospital, I am at the fair. I am actually taking vacation from the hospital to work full time at the fair this year.

Children’s, Twin Cities Moms Blog host #MNvaxchat

Subscribe to MightyAugust is National Immunization Awareness Month, and Minnesota’s new immunization requirements take effect Sept. 1. With that and back-to-school mode under way, we’ll be co-hosting a Twitter chat with our friends at Twin Cities Moms Blog.

Join us for the live chat, using #MNvaxchat from 8-9 p.m. Monday, that will feature Patsy Stinchfield, PNP, director of Infection Prevention and Control and the Children’s Immunization Project at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. Children’s and Twin Cities Moms Blog will be there, too. Participants who use #MNvaxchat in tweets during the live chat qualify for a chance to win a $50 Target gift card.

ALSO: Read the Children’s vaccinations blog archive on Mighty.

UPDATE: Participation strong, informative on #MNvaxchat

Red-Vested Rockstar: Lisa Zutz

Lisa Zutz is a volunteer at Children's.

Lisa Zutz is a volunteer at Children’s.

Lisa Zutz is an aspiring pediatric RN who currently works as a phlebotomist. She has volunteered on the inpatient units, in the sibling play area and, most recently, piloted a volunteer role in the lab, which has proved highly successful. What keeps Lisa coming back week after week? The positivity and bravery of our patients.

1. Why she rocks?

I got into volunteering because of its benefits; I believe that unpaid volunteers are kind of the “glue” that holds a community or even a hospital together. Volunteering makes me happy, and knowing that I am able to put a smile on a child’s face really makes my day. Volunteering at Children’s Hospital has brought so much fun and fulfillment to my life. I want to work as a nurse with children, and I feel that the skills I gain from volunteering will make me that much better of a nurse and a person.

2. What’s your favorite thing to do outside of volunteering?

Outside of volunteering, I keep pretty busy. I am very active and love to work out; whether it’s yoga, spin, or even a nice long run. Also, I spend a lot of time with my family.

3. Do you have any kids or pets of your own?

I do not have any kids, but once a week I babysit my two nieces, Chloe and Kinzi, ages 2 and 5. We have a blast together! I spend more time with my nieces than my actual friends. We enjoy going to the Maple Grove indoor maze, making cupcakes, playing outside and making projects. We definitely keep busy all day long. I also have a kitty. His name is Luigi, and I love him with all my heart. He is a beautiful mix: half-Siamese, half-Himalayan and loves to play and run around my condo.

Subscribe to Mighty4. If you could create a new candy bar, what would be in it and what would you name it?

I am not a lover of chocolate, but for everyone who is, I would make an ice cream bar loaded with caramel, pecans, rich chocolate and, of course, ice cream. I would call it “Caramel Delight,” and it would melt in your mouth!

5. Share a favorite volunteer experience or story.

I am not sure if I can choose a favorite; I believe every experience I have had at Children’s has made me into a better person. Each child is so different and unique that every experience has its own one-of-a-kind story. It is amazing to see how brave these kids truly are; they battle so hard and are so positive despite being sick. Life is so fragile, and when you see such young children sick, you realize how life should not be taken for granted. Volunteering is so rewarding!