Category Archives: Five Question Friday

Five Question Friday: Brian Brooks

Five Question FridayBrian BrooksThis week, Children’s is celebrating our chaplaincy team as part of Spiritual Care Week. We’re pleased to introduce you to Brian Brooks, Children’s chaplaincy and bereavement manager.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have been at Children’s for almost 19 years. January will be 19 years.

Describe your role.

In my role, I lead the team of chaplains in providing spiritual care to the patients and families that we serve. I also provide spiritual care directly to patients and families. Chaplains care for patients and families from all faith groups and help patients and families find hope, strength and healing on their journey of illness or injury. Another of my roles is the bereavement coordinator for Children’s. Bereavement services provides bereavement followup for two years to all families who have experienced the death of a child at Children’s. Bereavement services provides hospital memorial services, grief groups and other supportive events for bereaved families.

What do you love most about your job?

I enjoy working with a great team of colleagues, not just the chaplains, but the entire medical team, physicians, nurses, social workers and child life specialists, to name a few. In my role as bereavement coordinator, I recruit employees from many different areas of the hospital to help create and implement the programming that supports bereaved families.

Oct. 20-24 is Spiritual Care Week. What’s one thing you want people to know about chaplaincy at Children’s?

As chaplains, we care for people wherever they are on their journey of life. We don’t require that people be religious. Chaplains meet people on the human level, listening to the hopes and fears of our patients and families (and staff as well) and help them find the inner strength that they need to meet the challenge facing them. We help them explore the spiritual issues that are raised by their illness or injury. We also help people to explore how they might find new spiritual or community resources that will help them on their journey. Our role is support and care for people just as they are.

subscribe_blogWhat is your favorite book or movie?

One of my favorite movies is “The Matrix.” I had a teenage patient who kept telling me about the movie and that I needed to watch it. I really didn’t want to see it, but I finally agreed one day to watch the first half-hour of the movie with him during an infusion in the clinic. I hoped he would quit asking me to see the movie! Needless to say, I was immediately taken in by the spiritual themes of the movie that seemed so overt when I finally watched it. I am grateful that my patient didn’t give up on me!

My favorite book is “The Purpose Driven Life.”

Five Question Friday: Brooke Blaschka

Five Question FridayEvery October, we celebrate National Respiratory Care Week to recognize our respiratory care professionals at Children’s. This week, we introduce you to Brooke Blaschka, a respiratory therapist who has worked at Children’s for just over two years.

Brooke Blaschka

Brooke Blaschka

What is your role? I am registered respiratory therapist. I work in all areas in all units at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota on the Minneapolis campus.

What do you love most about your job? The thing I love most about my job is being able to help the patients. Even if it’s one patient a day, at least I know that I played a role in their recovery process and that they might be one step closer to going home with their families.

What drew you to working in respiratory therapy? I always knew I wanted to take care of kids, so I did some investigating as to what I could do, other than nursing, that would give me the opportunity to work with children. I wasn’t sure what respiratory therapy was until I actually started the program, but when I found out I fell in love, so I stuck with it.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was a kid, I wanted to somehow work with kids of all ages; it just took me sometime to figure out how I was going to do that.

How do you spend your time outside of work? Outside of work, I love to take my dog for a walk, I love to read, and I love to spend time with family “up north” at the cabin.

Five Question Friday: Jeff Mason

Five Question FridayThis week, we are pleased to introduce you to Jeff Mason, DPT, physical therapist. Jeff has worked at Children’s for nearly four years now and still tells people he landed his dream job on the first try. Learn more about Jeff and how he uses play to help children with cancer stay active.

Jeff Mason, DPT, physical therapist

Jeff Mason, DPT, physical therapist

What is your role at Children’s? I am a physical therapist, working primarily with children who have been diagnosed with cancer, and their famillies, to make sure that they can keep active and keep playing, at home and in the hospital.

What is a typical day like for you? I split my time between the Cancer and Blood Disorders clinic and the hospital, working with kids and their families toward the goal of physical activity, which I like to call play. We work against the disease process, as well as the side effects of chemotherapy, which can cause fatigue, muscle weakness, balance problems and sensation changes, like numbing or tingling (buzzing, as some kids have described it), that can really get in the way of playing. I spend my day crawling on the floor, making ramps for Matchbox cars out of mats or books and tissue boxes, dancing or marching in a parade (shout-out to Music Therapy!), riding bikes or scooters, and making a lot of animal noises. I was known for my elephant for a while in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) – it’s tough to keep that one at a reasonable volume.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s? One of my favorite memories was going for a bike ride through the tunnel in the basement with a patient who was on her 96th day in the hospital and had just learned that she was going to be here longer. She really wanted to bike, so we walked the bike to the elevators, where she taught me how to play the elevator guessing game (which elevator is it going to be? She won every time). Then, she took off through the tunnels, with me tailing her with her IV pole, the balloons tied to the top smacking me in the face with every stride, her giggles filling the tunnel with pure joy. Those tunnels could have gone on forever; I don’t think either of us would have stopped.

Subscribe to MightyWhat do you love most about your job? See above :) I think the challenge of walking into a situation where there isn’t much motivation to play, during a most difficult time in someone’s life, and figuring out what gets him/her excited, or what will make him/her smile, and figuring out a way to make that the focus. I love working with kids and their families to help them take control of some aspects of the journey when there are so many things that are/seem out of their control. I also enjoy the incredible team that makes up Children’s, including my brother, a nurse in the PICU!

How do you spend your time outside of work? I have 7- and 8-year-old boys at home, so, obviously, we have lots of dance parties. We read delightful children’s books, we bike, we play a game called “Jody Monster” at the park (I am Jody Monster; it makes some kids nervous, because I take my roles seriously, not breaking character). We also enjoy kayaking, fishing, and the Northwoods at my partner Annie’s family cabin near Ely. I recently took up tinkering, turning a toddler bed into a reading chair, and I make a mean radiator cover/bookshelf.

Five Question Friday: Terrance Davis

Five Question FridayIt’s Friday, and what better way to celebrate the end of the week than with a Five Question Friday profile? Meet Terrance Davis, who works on our Environmental Services team within the Minneapolis Surgery department.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children's for 25 years.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children’s for 25 years.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked here for 25 years.

Describe your role.

I clean surgery rooms between cases and stock supplies.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

I have a few favorites:

  • The surgery staff surprised me with a 50th birthday celebration.
  • Each annual craft show, which is so much fun
  • Gathering for the Environmental Services Week events

What do you think make kids great?

I have a couple answers for this one. First, they can smile at you and make your entire day better. Second, they have great energy, which can be contagious.

What is one interesting fact about you?

I was married in Las Vegas at the top of the Stratosphere tower with local TV personality “Fancy Ray” McCloney standing with me as my best man.

Five Question Friday: Kelly Patnode

Five Question Friday

Meet Kelly Patnode, patient access specialist at our St. Paul hospital, who has a love for the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn't working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn’t working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s in St. Paul for 36 years.

What drew you to Children’s?

I started in St. Paul when it was on “the hill” (across the highway from our current location) as a volunteer at the age of 13. I was a volunteer for four years. I went to school for medical office occupations, but there were no openings at that time. When I was talking to someone at Children’s, they said there was an opening for a health unit coordinator. I asked what that person did, and they explained that person works at the main desk on the floors. I asked if that was similar to a ward secretary, and they said yes. I said, “Well, I have done that job for four years, so I think I could do it!”

Subscribe to MightyWhat is a typical day like for you?

My typical day starts with making a coffee. It is just the right way to start of the day. I then clean and restart all the computers, restock supplies and then either sit at the emergency room desk and start answering the phone, make calls for the providers, put together a chart or break down a chart or start with registering patients who come to be seen in the ER.

What do you love most about your job?

Every day is a different day. What I did yesterday at my job may be totally different than the day before or today. If I can get a smile out of a patient and their parents, it just makes the day better.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

Usually I read books. But during the summertime I am busy because I also work at the Minnesota State Fair, selling box-office tickets for grandstand shows and pre-fair tickets. I have been working there for 38 years. So when I am not working at the hospital, I am at the fair. I am actually taking vacation from the hospital to work full time at the fair this year.

Five Question Friday: Dr. Anne-Marie Priebe

five_question_friday1

Dr. Anne-Marie Priebe is a gynecologist at Children's.

Dr. Anne-Marie Priebe is a gynecologist at Children’s.

For this edition of Five Question Friday, we’d like you to meet Anne-Marie Priebe, DO, who sees patients at Children’s St. Paul, Minneapolis and Woodbury clinics.

How long have you worked at Children’s? I joined the Children’s team in September of 2013.

Why did you go into pediatric and adolescent gynecology? I never imagined that I would work in either OBGYN or pediatrics. But through my rotations I fell in love with the scope of OBGYN because it is a great combination of office, surgery and hospital. Plus I find joy in helping a mom bring a new life into the world. I did a rotation during residency with a pediatric gynecologist at a children’s hospital. At times, a few patients and parents can have preconceived notions about gynecological issues, but being able to teach families about gynecology and realize the “GYNO” doesn’t have to be scary is rewarding.

What are some of the conditions you treat? People are often baffled when I tell them I am a pediatric and adolescent gynecologist. Their first thought is teen pregnancy. Although we do see patients for contraceptive counseling, teens are referred elsewhere for prenatal care. There are many other reasons to see your friendly Children’s gynecologist for medical or surgical management of:

  • Abnormal development of the reproductive system (congenital anomalies of the uterus or vagina)
  • Contraception, including pills, patches, rings, injections, implants, IUDs
  • Delayed puberty or periods
  • Endometriosis, tissue that grows outside of the uterus
  • Labial adhesions
  • Lichen sclerosus
  • Medical uses of hormonal contraceptives (acne, menstrual migraine, catamenial seizures)
  • Menstrual problems, including painful periods, heavy periods, frequent or irregular periods
  • Menstrual suppression
  • Ovarian cysts, fluid-filled sacs in or on the ovaries
  • Pelvic pain
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a hormonal syndrome affecting females
  • Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)
  • Torsion (or twisting) of the ovary
  • Vaginal stenosis
  • Vulvovaginitis
  • Vulvar trauma
  • Vulvar abscesses or ulcers

Subscribe to MightyWhat do you love most about your job? When I was in college, I worked at a camp for middle schoolers. I have a soft spot for the preteens and teenagers who want to learn about things, such as periods, but are either too scared to ask or don’t want to ask their parents. Often times they look to their friends for answers even when their friends might be misinformed. I hope to educate teens on gynecology issues, and, with any luck, they will pass on correct information to their friends, too.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work? I love to travel and explore new places. I have been to 41 out of 50 states and would love to make it to every continent. During my explorations, I have discovered photography and refuse to hang any photos on my walls unless I have visited the location. I also love to cook but hate leftovers.

If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go and why?  I have always dreamed of buying an around-the-world ticket and just keep progressively heading east to see how others live and how the past shapes their culture.

Five Question Friday: Samantha “Sam” Hanson

five_question_friday1It’s time for Five Question Friday! This week, we have a special video edition to introduce you to our new Chief Human Resources Officer, Samantha “Sam” Hanson. In her first few months with the organization, Sam has been inspired by the amazing work of our employees and how they create a difference in the lives of children in our clinics, hospitals and communities every day.

Watch the video to get to know Sam (including a special bonus FQF question) or read the transcript of her answers below.

Five Question Friday: Samantha “Sam” Hanson from Children’s of Minnesota on Vimeo.

What brought you to Children’s? I was very intrigued by Children’s mission and its employees. I have worked in several different organizations, leading HR, helping companies grow and learn. I was very attracted to the special qualities of the culture, the people and the mission of Children’s.

What has impressed you most so far? So far, I’ve been most impressed by the creativity of our employees. There isn’t a problem/situation that is too big or too complex. Every day I see our employees going the extra mile, driving innovation for the benefit of our families and our children.

What do you look forward to most about working at Children’s? I am dedicated to working with our HR organization to make sure that we have the tools, the learning opportunities and the services that we need to support our employees to do their very best.

Subscribe to MightyWhat was your favorite childhood toy? As a child, I remember being very fond of a Mrs. Beasley doll. This was a doll associated with a TV show. It was my favorite doll, and, in fact, my sister bought a Christmas ornament of the Mrs. Beasley doll – these are long gone – but it’s the first ornament that goes on the tree. But now that I have an 8- and 11-year-old, we play with all sorts of toys; building toys are our favorite (Legos). You can find us down in our playroom building lots of Lego sets.

What do you enjoy doing outside of Children’s? Well, we are parents of an 8- and 11-year-old, so you can find us on any given day at courtside or at a field somewhere. Our daughter also performs with Circus Juventas here in St. Paul. We are outdoorsy, we like to camp, paddle and hike, so we love to take advantage of Minnesota’s beautiful state parks. And on the rare occasion where Missy and I can get away, Italy is our favorite location.

Five Question Friday: Andrea Herbert

Meet Andrea Herbert, a CT/MRI technologist at our St. Paul hospital.

Andrea Herbert

Andrea Herbert

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at children’s for 13 years.

What do you love most about your job?

I love the variety of my job. I love working in CT/ MRI and X-ray. I get to advance in all three areas, and my skills continue to grow. The variety keeps me challenged at work, which is very nice since I have been here for 13 years.

What do you think makes kids great?

I think kids are great because they are positive and upbeat, for the most part. If they have something like cancer or a brain tumor, they are able to not dwell on it and continue being and acting like a kid. Also, when they are scared, I can work with them to make their tests not scary at all, and that is very rewarding when I see a smiles on their faces.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I spend a lot of time with my two kids, my boyfriend and my new puppy. We like to go on bike rides, walks and runs. I also love to go to concerts and out to new restaurants.

What’s your favorite restaurant?

My favorite restaurant is Ruth’s Chris.

Five Question Friday: Kris Ann Schultz, MD

Five Question FridayIn this week’s Five Question Friday, we catch up with Kris Ann Schultz, MD, as she talks about her work in our Cancer and Blood Disorders program and the many memories she has made working with children and their families.

During her first two years in college, Kris Ann Schultz, MD, wanted to be editor of Ranger Rick magazine or a pediatrician.

During her first two years in college, Kris Ann Schultz, MD, wanted to be editor of Ranger Rick magazine or a pediatrician.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I’ve worked at Children’s for six years.

What are some of the conditions you treat?

I care for children with cancer and blood disorders, usually brain tumors, solid tumors such as kidney or ovarian tumors, and leukemia.

You are the principle investigator for the International Ovarian and Testicular Stromal Tumor Registry. Can you tell us more about that project?

We started the International Ovarian and Testicular Stromal Tumor (OTST) Registry in December 2011 to try to understand more about what causes these rare tumors in children and young adults around the world, and how to best treat them. We suspected that these tumors were related to another kind of rare tumor we study here called pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). We knew we needed to understand more about that connection to help us find both kids of tumors in their earliest and most curable form.

Editor’s note: The OTST and PPB registries were recently featured in an NBC News story about a baby whose lung tumor was found early thanks to the research of the registries and the bravery of his mom.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

My favorite memories at Children’s are all about the kids and families I’ve cared for. I love watching the kids have fun at the Pine Tree Apple Tennis Classic to raise funds for children’s cancer research. I love watching doctors, hospital staff, parents and siblings shave their heads in honor our young heroes at our annual head shaving event to support St. Baldrick’s. Both the Pine Tree Apple Tennis Classic and St. Baldrick’s Foundation support the OTST and cancer research at Children’s.

Subscribe to MightyWhat’s one interesting fact about you?

During my first two years in college, I wanted to be either editor of Ranger Rick magazine or a pediatrician. I decided that I wanted to be a doctor when I was in a small village in rural Tanzania. I was studying giraffe during the day and spending time in the village in the afternoons and evenings when it was too hot to track giraffe. Working with the amazing people there made me realize I wanted to work with people in a direct “hands-on” way and pediatric oncology has been a great way to do that.

At home, I love spending time with my family, my husband and our three kids.

Five Question Friday: Janay Moore

Senior talent acquisition assistant Janay Moore has been with Children's since February 2012.

Senior talent acquisition assistant Janay Moore has been with Children’s since February 2012.

Janay Moore, senior talent acquisition assistant, has a job she loves – helping others find jobs they love at Children’s! Get to know Janay in this week’s Five Question Friday.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I started working at Children’s as a contractor in August of 2011 but I applied for a regular position and was hired in February 2012. Therefore, I just celebrated my two-year anniversary in February.

Describe your role.

I’m a senior talent acquisition assistant. My primary responsibilities include: recruitment for the clinical support associate positions, the MNA internal bidding process, pre-boarding our RN travelers, and supporting our new grad training program and external nursing recruitment.

What’s your favorite memory from working at Children’s?

My favorite memory working at Children’s is an ongoing one. As a part of the Talent Acquisition Team we are involved in a number of student internships in the community. It’s a blast to see the growth of our student interns from Cristo Rey, Project Search and the Step-Up program mature into young working professionals. Just another reminder of why we do the things we do.

Subscribe to MightyWhen you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Funny enough when I was a kid I always thought I wanted to be a veterinarian. As I matured, I realized that I loved the idea of working with animals but couldn’t live with the idea of working with ailing or dying ones. It’s important to know your strengths and weakness and emotionally it was too much for me.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I love spending time with my husband and our two daughters, Aarylin, age 6, and Milaya, age 3. We really enjoy going to the park, shopping and traveling!