Category Archives: Philanthropy

Children’s pain and palliative care clinic opens new doors

The Kiran Stordalen and Horst Rechelbacher Pediatric Pain, Palliative and Integrative Medicine Clinic opened Jan. 6 at Children's – Minneapolis.

The Kiran Stordalen and Horst Rechelbacher Pediatric Pain, Palliative and Integrative Medicine Clinic opened Jan. 6 at Children’s – Minneapolis.

With its work in the treatment of pediatric pain, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota opens new doors, literally.

Ten years after the start of an inpatient pain and palliative program, and nine years after the opening of Children’s original pain clinic, the Kiran Stordalen and Horst Rechelbacher Pediatric Pain, Palliative and Integrative Medicine Clinic, located on the fifth floor of the Tower building at Children’s – Minneapolis, celebrates its grand opening this month.

The 10,000-square-foot clinic, the first of its kind in the world, combines Children’s pain medicine, palliative care and integrative medicine services into a single space, creating a state-of-the-art healing environment for kids and their families. The clinic, named in recognition of the lead gift from Horst Rechelbacher, the late cosmetics entrepreneur, and his wife and business partner, Kiran Stordelan, furthers Children’s ability to minimize pain for patients and make their treatment, healing or hospice experience as comfortable, pleasant and peaceful as possible.

Stefan Friedrichsdorf, MD (left), is medical director of Children’s pain clinic.

Stefan Friedrichsdorf, MD (left), is medical director of Children’s pain clinic.

One of the clinic’s main features is the Snoezelen room, a controlled multisensory environment that combines sounds, scents, colors and lighting effects to stimulate and soothe patients, including those who are nonverbal, blind, hearing impaired or have cognitive delays.

Other features include a ceiling canopy of birch leaves comprised of more than 500 photos; sound-absorptive ceilings and padded, resilient floors that reduce the sound of footsteps and increase comfort for patients and clinicians; lighting designed to create a restful, intimate environment; and an interactive waterfall designed by Dr. Clement Shimizu, a former Children’s patient.

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VIDEO: Children’s Stefan Friedrichsdorf, MD, talks about palliative care.

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Images of flowers, plants and landscapes unique to Minnesota are incorporated throughout the clinic. The lobby features local artwork from nature photographer Craig Blacklock, whose images include larger-than-life birth leaves and bark, stones and plants. The sound is that of a natural environment: wind, water and bird calls.

subscribe_blogA massage room staffed by nationally certified massage therapists provides a space for CranioSacral Therapy, a gentle, hands-on approach that releases tensions deep in the body to relieve pain and improve health.

A gym and rehabilitation area with a treadmill, swing, video game system and other equipment is used to help encourage kids with chronic pain to move and exercise.

Expansion plans for the clinic, led by medical director Stefan Friedrichsdorf, MD, add acupuncture and day-treatment services for groups of children with chronic pain, and more massage therapists.

The Kiran Stordalen and Horst Rechelbacher Pediatric Pain, Palliative and Integrative Medicine Clinic officially opened Jan. 6.

PHOTO GALLERY: The Kiran Stordalen and Horst Rechelbacher Pediatric Pain, Palliative and Integrative Medicine Clinic opened Jan. 6, 2015, at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota’s Minneapolis campus.

Funds from triathlon to benefit Children’s-attended camp

Victory In Progress (VIP) is a newly renamed camp that has helped kids, including Children's patients, with cancer or blood disorders for 31 years. (Photo courtesy of CycleHealth)

Victory In Progress (VIP) is a newly renamed camp that has helped kids, including Children’s patients, with cancer or blood disorders for 31 years. (Photo courtesy of CycleHealth)

Q4_mighty_buttonCycleHealth, a Twin Cities-based nonprofit that raised more than $62,000 for Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota with its first-ever BreakAway Kids Tri (triathlon) in August, announced that funds raised from its 2015 event will benefit the newly renamed Victory In Progress (VIP), a camp for kids, including Children’s patients, with cancer or blood disorders.

The camp, which had lost its previous source of funding, was chosen in a unanimous vote by CycleHealth’s Kid Advisory Panel. Money raised at the BreakAway Kids Tri will cover the costs of sending more than 100 kids to the camp, which has helped kids for 31 years.

The second annual BreakAway Kids Tri takes place Aug. 22, 2015, at Lake Elmo Park Reserve.

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Meet Madeline

Madeline

What Madeline loves most about Children’s is that they care for her.

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: Madeline

Age: 7

Hometown: Elk River

Madeline has received care from Children’s for heart surgery and C. difficile, a bacterial infection.

When Madeline grows up, she wants to be a house designer and build a house for her parents.

What Madeline loves most about Children’s is that they care for her.

Meet Aden

Aden

What Aden loves about Children’s is his nurse, Linda, who he says is “the best nurse in the nurse history!”

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: Aden

Age: 8

Hometown: Eagan

Aden came to Children’s due to inflammation on his pancreas. He had a cyst removed from his bile duct.

When Aden grows up, he wants to be a doctor because he enjoys school.

What Aden loves about Children’s is his nurse, Linda, who he says is “the best nurse in the nurse history!”

Making of “Meet Abbey, future ballerina”

We get to work with amazing kids like Abbey every day at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. And each one has a dream that’s worth reaching.

The concept of the “Give today. Support tomorrows.” fundraising campaign is built on the spirit that every child has the chance to realize his or her hopes and dreams.

Take a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the commercial featuring Abbey, the future ballerina, and her family.

You can help our kids get to “when I grow up.” Give today. Support tomorrows.

Making of “Meet Abbey, future ballerina” from Children’s of Minnesota on Vimeo.

30-second commercial:

Meet Abbey, future ballerina from Children’s of Minnesota on Vimeo.

Meet John

When John grows up, he wants to be a hockey player.

When John grows up, he wants to be a hockey player.

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: John

Age: 8

Hometown: Hastings

John was referred to Children’s, where he and his family learned he had stage IV advanced neuroblastoma. He has undergone chemotherapy, surgeries, radiation, a stem cell transplant, antibody therapy and now is participating in the difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) trial.

When John grows up, he wants to be a hockey player. Maybe even for the Minnesota Wild! Go, Wild!

No child loves being in the hospital, but when John is at Children’s, he loves watching The Dude on Channel 13.

Meet Sam

Sam came to Children’s because of hypoplastic left heart (HLH) syndrome and has undergone four open-heart surgeries to help reroute it.

Sam came to Children’s because of hypoplastic left heart (HLH) syndrome and has undergone four open-heart surgeries to help reroute it.

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: Sam

Age: 3

Hometown: Litchfield

Sam came to Children’s because of hypoplastic left heart (HLH) syndrome and has undergone four open-heart surgeries to help reroute it.

When Sam grows up, he wants to build parks because he loves playing in parks.

When at Children’s, Sam loves “all of the train toys they let me play with.”

Sam, 3

Sam, 3

Father of cystic fibrosis patient plans concert, silent auction for Children’s

Edison Hopper was born with cystic fibrosis. (Amy Best / Amy Colleen Photography)

Edison Hopper was born with cystic fibrosis. (Amy Best / Amy Colleen Photography)

If you asked Charlie Hopper if the birth of his son was hard, you’d be off. Way off.

“To say it was difficult would be inaccurate,” Hopper said. “Any time you’re confronted with something your child has that could shorten his life shifts your perspective. We’ve done our best to take his diagnosis in stride, and the help of the team at Children’s has made that possible.”

A week after Edison Hopper was born last year, he was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF). He has been treated at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota ever since. It was a diagnosis that will forever impact the Hopper family. Parents Charlie and Becky have not only accepted it but also pledged to help other kids like Edison and all kids cared for by Children’s.

CF is a life-threatening genetic disease that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system. A defective gene and its protein product cause the body to produce unusually thick, sticky mucus. It clogs the lungs and leads to life-threatening lung infections, as well as obstructs the pancreas and stops natural enzymes from helping the body break down food and absorb vital nutrients.

After Becky became pregnant with Edison, she learned she was a CF carrier. As a result, Charlie was tested and also found to be a carrier. When both parents are carriers, children have a 1-in-4 chance of having CF. It wasn’t until after Edison was born that they learned his diagnosis.

“Emotionally, it was difficult after Edison was born, but we got to a point where everything leveled out, and it got easier and easier. We don’t know any different,” Hopper said.

Edison receives daily treatment. He takes 40,000 units of enzymes with every meal to help him maintain body weight, Hopper said. He uses a nebulizer twice a day and wears a vest during treatment to help loosen the mucus in his lungs.

He visits Children’s, specifically Dr. Brooke Moore at Children’s Respiratory and Critical Care Specialists (CRCCS) every three months for checkups. He does an annual visit with his whole CF team (doctor, nurse, dietitian, social worker, and respiratory therapist). To date, he has been healthy and hasn’t once been hospitalized.

Since Edison was born, there have been many promising developments for people with his diagnosis. Life expectancy on average for a person with cystic fibrosis is just over 37 years. Kids born today with it should live into their 50s, on average, Hopper has learned.

Q4_mighty_button“Part of why CF has advanced is because of places like Children’s,” he said.

Charlie and Becky are expecting their second child next year. Because they’re both carriers of the defective gene, their next child could have cystic fibrosis, too.

“We obviously don’t want our next child to have CF,” Hopper said. “But in the event our unborn son has CF, we’ll know how to manage it.”

Hopper wants to raise $15,000 yet this year for Children’s in honor of his son and the thousands of other kids for whom Children’s cares.

“Everything that Children’s represents is something bigger than us as individuals,” Hopper said. “They go above and beyond.”

To help raise funds for Children’s, Hopper has organized a benefit concert, featuring national touring band Blitzen Trapper at the Fine Line Music Café on Dec. 12 presented by 89.3 The Current and McTerry Music. Local standouts Farewell Milwaukee, Bigtree Bonsai and Old Desert Road will also perform. Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 at the door and $50 for VIP (balcony access and $20 bar tab); doors open for the concert at 7 p.m. Tickets are selling fast and can be purchased here.

There will be a pre-event silent auction sponsored by IPR directly next door to the Fine Line at 300 N. First Ave. from 4-7 p.m., featuring live acoustic music by local musicians David and Zach Young (Down and Above, Going to the Sun) and Ray Smart (The Attley Project, Meridian Incident). Admission to that event is $10 and includes free food and drinks, as well as two complimentary raffle tickets for prizes to be given away after the concert at the Fine Line (need not be present to win). Tickets can be purchased here. People with tickets to the concert will be admitted free. If you cannot attend either event but want to support the cause, give today.

Meet Julia

When Julia grows up, she wants to be a veterinarian so she can take care of cute animals.

When Julia grows up, she wants to be a veterinarian so she can take care of cute animals.

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: Julia

Age: 8

Hometown: Elk River

When she was 5 years old, Julia was taken to Children’s after her mom discovered she was turning blue and feeling extra-tired. He lungs collapsed, and doctors discovered that Julia has a rare asthma, triggered by viruses.

When Julia grows up, she wants to be a veterinarian so she can take care of cute animals.

She likes practically everything about Children’s, so she’s raising $1,000 annually for the next five years to help other kids.

Meet Katie

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program.

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program.

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: Katie

Age: 5

Hometown: Eden Prairie

Katie was rushed from Abbott Northwestern Hospital to Children’s after she was born 15 weeks early. She only weighed a pound and had to stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for 99 days. According to her mom, she is now happy, healthy and doing wonderfully.

When Katie grows up, she wants to be a dancer. She loves to dance.

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program. Her brother, a member of our Youth Advisory Council (YAC), even helped to design a music cart for the music therapists at Children’s.