Tag Archives: Emergency

Trauma: When it’s critical, so is your choice

Why would you take your child to Children’s emergency room over any other hospital? Our team members are on staff, not on call. Your child gets treated immediately.

When it’s critical, so is your choice. Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

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Top 10 reasons why kids have to go to the ER

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, our Level I Pediatric Trauma Center in Minneapolis is the only one of its kind in the state. When it’s critical, so is your choice. We see kids in our emergency room for a variety of reasons. Here are the top 10:

10. Poisoning

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Be sure to keep medications, cleaners and other potential household hazards away from children.

9. Water activities

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Injuries that happen in water, including slipping in the bathtub, boating accidents, swimming and diving, can lead to a trip to the ER.

8. Wheeled sports (skateboards, inline skates, scooters)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

It doesn’t matter if there’s no motor. If there’s wheels, there’s a way.

7. Seasonal activities

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

This category includes just about anything under the sun, as long as it’s not an activity that takes place year-round. Seasonal activities can include snowboarding, sledding, ice skating, ATV and horseback riding.

6. Violence

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

This one is fairly self-explanatory. Unfortunately, violent actions of all kinds are a reason we see kids in the ER.

5. Motor vehicle accidents

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Accidents involving cars or other motor vehicles are the fifth-most-common reason kids visit the ER.

4. Bicycle accidents

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

This writer had countless spills off of his bike as a kid. Fortunately, none of them led to a hospital visit. When riding, be safe and make sure you wear a properly fitting helmet!

3. Playgrounds spills

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Playgrounds are a common source of leading to ER trips. Play hard, but play safely.

2. Sports

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

It’s no surprise due to the popularity and abundant variety of sports that it’s one of the main reasons children can land in the emergency room.

1. Home injuries

 

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Home may be where the heart is, but it’s also where most injuries happen. Simply due to the amount of time we spend at home compared to anywhere else, we’re bound to occasionally trip down the stairs or bump our head on a table. Make sure your home is appropriately set up for its occupants to maximize safety.

Join Children’s trauma expert for Twitter chat

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David Hirschman, MD

David Hirschman, MD

David Hirschman, MD, co-medical director of Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota’s emergency department, will answer the questions you have about trauma, emergencies and the emergency room in a Twitter chat, courtesy of Children’s and the Twin Cities Moms Blog.

The hour-long Minnesota Trauma Chat takes place at noon Wednesday, July 8. The chat’s hashtag is #MNTraumaChat. Dr. Hirschman will tweet from Children’s account (@ChildrensMN), and the Twin Cities Moms Blog will host from its account (@TCMomsBlog).

A $50 Starbucks gift card will be given at random to one chat participant. Be sure to use #MNTraumaChat in your questions and comments to be eligible. Feel free to RSVP to the event and check out some Twitter chat 101 from the Twin Cities Moms Blog.

At Children’s, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s — Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.

Trauma 101: What it means to be a Level I pediatric trauma center

Our pediatric specialists in Minneapolis are on site, not on call, so they can get to children immediately.

Children’s pediatric specialists in Minneapolis are on site, not on call, so they can get to children immediately.

On the surface, it may be difficult to distinguish one hospital from another. Each one has doctors, nurses and operating rooms. Every place has an emergency room, and all ERs are the same, right?

Not exactly.

So then what does it mean when you’re told that Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota has a Level I pediatric trauma center in Minneapolis?

Established in June 2013, Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center in Minneapolis received the American College of Surgeons’ verification by meeting the highest standards of expertise and level of preparation to care for critically injured children, which increases Children’s commitment to families throughout the region. Children’s – Minneapolis was designated by the Minnesota Department of Health as the first and only pediatric-only hospital in the state with ACS Level I recognition.

Children’s can accept injured kids directly from the site of the traumatic injury via ambulance or helicopter instead of being transferred from another hospital after being stabilized.

Children’s can accept injured kids directly from the site of the traumatic injury via ambulance or helicopter instead of being transferred from another hospital after being stabilized.

Trauma

Trauma is the leading cause of death and disability in children. The first hour after an accident, the golden hour, is critical. Children’s can accept injured kids directly from the site of the traumatic injury via ambulance or helicopter instead of being transferred from another hospital after being stabilized.

Children’s – Minneapolis’ transformation from Level III status to Level I took three years, a process that was sped up with help of $17.5 million grant and ongoing philanthropic partnership from Minnetonka-based UnitedHealthcare, a UnitedHealth Group company, in 2010, making the UnitedHealthcare Pediatric Emergency Department and Level I Trauma Center a reality.

The emergency department at Children’s – St. Paul, which is Level III, has been renovated, and its staff go through the same training as those in Minneapolis.

At its Minneapolis and St. Paul hospitals, Children’s receives more than 90,000 visits annually and treats nearly 40 percent of Twin Cities pediatric trauma cases.

At its Minneapolis and St. Paul hospitals, Children’s receives more than 90,000 visits annually and treats nearly 40 percent of Twin Cities pediatric trauma cases.

Level I standards

At its Minneapolis and St. Paul hospitals, Children’s receives more than 90,000 visits annually and treats nearly 40 percent of Twin Cities pediatric trauma cases. When it comes to ACS-verified Level I attributes, Children’s has:

  • More than 150 emergency department staff, including board-eligible or board-certified pediatric emergency physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses and more
  • 24/7 in-house pediatric trauma surgeon; Children’s pediatric specialists in Minneapolis are on site, not on call, so they can get to kids immediately
  • Two large trauma bays, resuscitation rooms, a helipad and dedicated orthopedic room for fractures, featuring advanced X-ray capabilities
  • Research programs and performance improvement efforts to ensure that each patient experience leads to the best possible outcome
  • Injury prevention efforts such as Making Safe Simple, Children’s public education program designed to arm the community with basic safety and injury prevention tips

subscribe_blogPlan for the unplanned

You plan everything out for your kids (classes, camps and nutrition). It’s important to have a plan in case they’re in a serious accident. If your child has an emergency, know where to go. Program Children’s ER contact information into your phone. Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota are located in Minneapolis (2525 Chicago Ave. S.) and St. Paul (345 N. Smith Ave.)

When it’s critical, so is your choice — Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

Playing with Fire

Don't forget it's still fire

Fourth of July is typically a time of family gatherings and fun-filled outdoor activities to celebrate our nation’s freedom. But for many, celebration can quickly turn to sadness when a child is injured. Hospital emergency departments see an increase in preventable injuries to children over the Fourth of July.

Fireworks are a leading cause of injury during this holiday, and children account for one half of all firework-related injuries.

Why do parents who would normally guard their child from a three-hundred-degree oven hand them a one-thousand-degree sparkler? Is it because parents are so distracted by the beauty of the sparkles that they forget it’s still fire?

Sparklers are responsible for the vast majority of legal firework-related injuries. Parents, you can reduce the risk of injury by following some very basic safety tips:

  • Do not allow children under the age of 12 to use sparklers without very close adult supervision
  • Do not allow children to wave a sparkler
  • Do not allow children to run while holding a sparkler
  • Never light more than one sparkler at a time
  • Drop spent sparklers directly into a bucket of water

I know, it wouldn’t be a Fourth of July celebration without the sights, sounds, and smells of fireworks. But to get the most enjoyment out of this traditional activity, please be safe and protect your children from firework-related injuries.

As you prepare for this holiday I’d like to know what are some precautions you take to keep your kids safe?

Kristi Moline is the Injury Prevention Manager for Trauma Services at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.