Children’s at the Capitol: Newborn screening comes to a vote

Update: Late Thursday night, April 10, we were disappointed to hear that the newborn screening vote scheduled for that day was unexpectedly pulled from the schedule. We fully expect that newborn screening will still be voted on this session, likely later in April. Help us make sure that legislators know how critical this program is for child health by contacting your state representatives (action link below)!


Today the Minnesota House of Representatives will be considering and voting on a bill to restore Minnesota’s newborn screening program, which is credited with saving more than 5,000 lives since its inception 50 years ago. We’ve provided the streaming video of the House floor session below, though the debate on newborn screening may not happen until later today.

Urgent action needed

Up until the House floor vote happens, you can contact your state representative and ask for his or her support on the Newborn Screening bill, H.F. 2526, authored by Representative Kim Norton. Taking action is easy, and it only takes a minute! This bill is critically important to newborn health and your legislators need to hear that you support this program today. (A couple things to note about the action page: 1. You’ll need to enter your full ZIP code (first 5 numbers + 4-digit extension) in order to connect with your state rep. 2. Use “MN” instead of “Minnesota.”)

What is newborn screening?

The program is simple: At birth, all newborns have a small blood sample collected through a heal prick. The blood spots are put onto a card and then tested for more than 50 genetic and chromosomal abnormalities. These tests are essential in detecting many serious and often hidden conditions, including some that, if diagnosed and treated early, can have a critical impact on the health of a child.

Why is this debate happening?

Over the past few years, the newborn screening program has been modified so that currently the Minnesota Department of Health can only retain blood spots for a short period of time before destroying them, possibly missing the window of diagnosis.

The problem is that there are many reasons these samples should be kept on hand, including: some conditions can take several months to diagnose; cards may be needed for reassessment at a later date; or they may be used for comparison when a younger sibling is born. Without long-term storage, we lose the ability to go back and review the samples when critical health questions arise.

Watch it live:

Watch live streaming video from uptakemnhouse at livestream.com

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