Author Archives: Jimmy Bellamy

About Jimmy Bellamy

Social media specialist, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota

Children’s ranks among top social media-friendly hospitals

TOP75_CHILDRENS_HOSPITALSChildren’s Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota ranks No. 7 on the list of the Top 75 Social Media Friendly Children’s Hospitals for 2014, as selected by NurseJournal.org.

NurseJournal.org measured the social media presence of children’s hospitals in the U.S. to gauge which organizations best utilized their Facebook and Twitter accounts to connect with patients. Children’s scored 82.5 out of a possible 100 points.

Thank you to all of our followers across every social media platform for engaging with Children’s for health care news, trends, information and patient stories. And thank you, NurseJournal.org, for recognizing Children’s commitment to its patients, families and supporters.

NurseJournal.org also released its list of top 100 non-children’s hospitals.

Follow Children’s on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, YouTube, Vimeo, Pinterest, Vine and LinkedIn.

Trauma 101: What it means to be a Level I pediatric trauma center

Our pediatric specialists in Minneapolis are on site, not on call, so they can get to children immediately.

Children’s pediatric specialists in Minneapolis are on site, not on call, so they can get to children immediately.

On the surface, it may be difficult to distinguish one hospital from another. Each one has doctors, nurses and operating rooms. Every place has an emergency room, and all ERs are the same, right?

Not exactly.

So then what does it mean when you’re told that Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota has a Level I pediatric trauma center in Minneapolis?

Established in June 2013, Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center in Minneapolis received the American College of Surgeons’ verification by meeting the highest standards of expertise and level of preparation to care for critically injured children, which increases Children’s commitment to families throughout the region. Children’s – Minneapolis was designated by the Minnesota Department of Health as the first and only pediatric-only hospital in the state with ACS Level I recognition.

Children’s can accept injured kids directly from the site of the traumatic injury via ambulance or helicopter instead of being transferred from another hospital after being stabilized.

Children’s can accept injured kids directly from the site of the traumatic injury via ambulance or helicopter instead of being transferred from another hospital after being stabilized.

Trauma

Trauma is the leading cause of death and disability in children.The first hour after an accident, the golden hour, is critical. Children’s can accept injured kids directly from the site of the traumatic injury via ambulance or helicopter instead of being transferred from another hospital after being stabilized.

Children’s – Minneapolis’ transformation from Level III status to Level I took three years, a process that was sped up with help of $17.5 million grant and ongoing philanthropic partnership from Minnetonka-based UnitedHealthcare, a UnitedHealth Group company, in 2010, making the UnitedHealthcare Pediatric Emergency Department and Level I Trauma Center a reality.

The emergency department at Children’s – St. Paul, which is Level III, has been renovated, and its staff go through the same training as those in Minneapolis.

At its Minneapolis and St. Paul hospitals, Children’s receives more than 90,000 visits annually and treats nearly 40 percent of Twin Cities pediatric trauma cases.

At its Minneapolis and St. Paul hospitals, Children’s receives more than 90,000 visits annually and treats nearly 40 percent of Twin Cities pediatric trauma cases.

Level I standards

At its Minneapolis and St. Paul hospitals, Children’s receives more than 90,000 visits annually and treats nearly 40 percent of Twin Cities pediatric trauma cases. When it comes to ACS-verified Level I attributes, Children’s has:

  • More than 150 emergency department staff, including board-eligible or board-certified pediatric emergency physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses and more
  • 24/7 in-house pediatric trauma surgeon; Children’s pediatric specialists in Minneapolis are on site, not on call, so they can get to kids immediately
  • Two large trauma bays, resuscitation rooms, a helipad and dedicated orthopedic room for fractures, featuring advanced X-ray capabilities
  • Research programs and performance improvement efforts to ensure that each patient experience leads to the best possible outcome
  • Injury prevention efforts such as Making Safe Simple, Children’s public education program designed to arm the community with basic safety and injury prevention tips

Subscribe to MightyPlan for the unplanned

You plan everything out for your kids (classes, camps and nutrition). It’s important to have a plan in case they’re in a serious accident. If your child has an emergency, know where to go. Program Children’s ER contact information into your phone. Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota are located in Minneapolis (2525 Chicago Ave. S.) and St. Paul (345 N. Smith Ave.)

When it’s critical, so is your choice – Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

Top 10 reasons why kids have to go to the ER

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, our Level I Pediatric Trauma Center in Minneapolis is the only one of its kind in the state. When it’s critical, so is your choice. We see kids in our emergency room for a variety of reasons. Here are the top 10:

10. Poisoning

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Be sure to keep medications, cleaners and other potential household hazards away from children.

9. Water activities

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Injuries that happen in water, including slipping in the bathtub, boating accidents, swimming and diving, can lead to a trip to the ER.

8. Wheeled sports (skateboards, inline skates, scooters)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

It doesn’t matter if there’s no motor. If there’s wheels, there’s a way.

7. Seasonal activities

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

This category includes just about anything under the sun, as long as it’s not an activity that takes place year-round. Seasonal activities can include snowboarding, sledding, ice skating, ATV and horseback riding.

6. Violence

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

This one is fairly self-explanatory. Unfortunately, violent actions of all kinds are a reason we see kids in the ER.

5. Motor vehicle accidents

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Accidents involving cars or other motor vehicles are the fifth-most-common reason kids visit the ER.

4. Bicycle accidents

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

This writer had countless spills off of his bike as a kid. Fortunately, none of them led to a hospital visit. When riding, be safe and make sure you wear a properly fitting helmet!

3. Playgrounds spills

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Playgrounds are a common source of leading to ER trips. Play hard, but play safely.

2. Sports

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

It’s no surprise due to the popularity and abundant variety of sports that it’s one of the main reasons children can land in the emergency room.

1. Home injuries

 

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

(iStock photo / Getty Images)

Home may be where the heart is, but it’s also where most injuries happen. Simply due to the amount of time we spend at home compared to anywhere else, we’re bound to occasionally trip down the stairs or bump our head on a table. Make sure your home is appropriately set up for its occupants to maximize safety.

Newest Timberwolves Wiggins, Bennett, Young and LaVine visit Children’s

Members of the Minnesota Timberwolves posed for photos with fans at Children's – Minneapolis.

Minnesota Timberwolves mascot Crunch and rookie Andrew Wiggins pose for photos with fans while Thaddeus Young colors pictures at Children’s – Minneapolis.

New Minnesota Timberwolves (from left) Anthony Bennett, Andrew Wiggins, Thaddeus Young and Zach LaVine and mascot Crunch join The Dude during an episode of "Kids Clubhouse" on Wednesday inside Star Studio at Children's – Minneapolis.

New Minnesota Timberwolves (from left) Anthony Bennett, Andrew Wiggins, Thaddeus Young and Zach LaVine and mascot Crunch join The Dude during an episode of “Kids Clubhouse” on Wednesday inside Star Studio at Children’s – Minneapolis.

By Jimmy Bellamy

The latest additions to the Minnesota Timberwolves’ roster have had a busy week. Three days after the team acquired Andrew Wiggins, Anthony Bennett and Thaddeus Young in a blockbuster trade, the trio and Zach LaVine, the Wolves’ top pick in this year’s draft, met fans at the Minnesota State Fair. The fanfare continued Wednesday when the players and team mascot Crunch met some of their youngest supporters at Children’s – Minneapolis.

The players joined The Dude for an episode of “Kids Clubhouse,” where they played basketball and taught The Dude how to execute a proper chest pass. After that it was on to the seventh-floor playroom to hang out, color pictures, sign autographs and pose for photos with patients.

A photo gallery of the team’s visit is available on our Facebook page.

The Timberwolves also produced a video of the visit on NBA.com.

Participation strong for #MNvaxchat

By Jimmy Bellamy

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Thank you to everyone who joined us for #MNvaxchat on Monday night. More than 75 participants from across the U.S. engaged in a conversation about vaccinations with Patsy Stinchfield, PNP, Children’s director of infectious disease prevention and control, and John W. Baker, MD, a pediatrician at Metropolitan Pediatric Specialists in Burnsville.

The informative hour-long chat, hosted by Children’s and Twin Cities Moms Blog, respectfully covered more than a dozen unique, well-researched topics with a highly engaged audience of parents and advocates.

The recipient of the $50 Target gift card is Linsey Rippy. Congratulations, Linsey!

We look forward to hosting more Twitter chats on a variety of health topics!

Jimmy Bellamy is the social media specialist at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

Children’s, Twin Cities Moms Blog host #MNvaxchat

Subscribe to MightyAugust is National Immunization Awareness Month, and Minnesota’s new immunization requirements take effect Sept. 1. With that and back-to-school mode under way, we’ll be co-hosting a Twitter chat with our friends at Twin Cities Moms Blog.

Join us for the live chat, using #MNvaxchat from 8-9 p.m. Monday, that will feature Patsy Stinchfield, PNP, director of Infection Prevention and Control and the Children’s Immunization Project at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. Children’s and Twin Cities Moms Blog will be there, too. Participants who use #MNvaxchat in tweets during the live chat qualify for a chance to win a $50 Target gift card.

ALSO: Read the Children’s vaccinations blog archive on Mighty.

UPDATE: Participation strong, informative on #MNvaxchat

Making magic happen: The infant-toddler brain

Anna Youngerman is the director of advocacy and health policy at Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and a proud parent of her 2-year-old son.

Anna Youngerman is the director of advocacy and health policy at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and a proud parent of her 2-year-old son.

By Anna Youngerman

For many parents, sleep-deprived might be how we choose to describe the first three years of a child’s life — at least it has been for me. But as I look through the haze of too few hours of sleep, there’s also magic to these early years. I frequently find myself in a state of awe and wonder at my growing child. The first time your baby catches your eye and holds your gaze, the first time he says “mommy,” the cobbling together of phrases to describe his day and even the frustration-driven tantrums — those are all magical moments.

It turns out there’s a reason the awe-inspiring moments come fast and furious during these earliest years. The brain wiring is on hyper-drive:

  • 80 percent of brain development happens by the time a child is 3 years old.
  • 700 new neural connections are made every second in the first few years of life.

This naturally occurring development can serve as a springboard for a productive, healthy life. Yet, just as a magician must carefully prepare for a trick so it appears both astonishing and seamless, helping every child realize the powerful potential of these years also requires intentional support.

Inspiring action

Though our paper, “Foundation for Life: The Significance of Birth to Three,” we want to inspire more robust discussion and action around the value of investments in and attention to our youngest children. We want to invite the tough questions and – more importantly – be part of answering them:

  • What can we do, collectively, to reach the most vulnerable children?
  • How do we mitigate toxic stress factors that tear away at a child’s potential?
  • What’s the community’s role in ensuring that no child lacks the positive relationships so crucial to healthy development?
  • How do we build a coordinated system that focuses on what a child needs and not what the system needs?
  • Subscribe to MightyHow do we reach children at an age (0-3) when they often are cared for by family, friends and neighbors and not always tied to existing systems?

These aren’t easy questions, but just because they’re tough doesn’t mean we shouldn’t take them on and figure out how to work together toward getting answers. The stakes are just too high and the opportunity too great.

Like most parents, I’ll gladly navigate my sleep deprivation in exchange for giving my kiddo every opportunity he deserves. That’s the hope and dedication we want to inspire. I hope you’ll join us.

Anna Youngerman is the director of advocacy and health policy at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and a proud parent of her 2-year-old son.

Tech Spotlight: A look at Visualase, a minimally invasive laser surgery system

Visualase's workstation interfaces with an MRI to allow temperature control and monitoring in real time during a treatment.

Visualase’s workstation interfaces with an MRI to allow temperature control and monitoring in real time during a treatment.

Gavin Pierson, now 8, of Ramsey, Minnesota, underwent two Visualase procedures in October and February.

Gavin Pierson, now 8, of Ramsey, Minnesota, underwent two Visualase procedures in October and February.

The story of Gavin Pierson, the 8-year-old Ramsey, Minnesota, boy battling a brain tumor, includes a number of key players: his doctors, parents, siblings and care team, and the thousands of people who have followed his two-year fight against the aptly nicknamed “Joe Bully.”

But one of Gavin’s most important allies doesn’t have a degree, voice or personal Facebook page.

Visualase, an MRI-guided, minimally invasive laser system, has been the Kryptonite to Gavin’s tumor since he became the first person with a mature teratoma brain tumor to undergo the procedure. His first laser surgery took place on Oct. 29, 2013, at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and his second four months later on Feb. 20, 2014.

“There are many things that make this procedure unique. One is the use of MRI, which allows us to monitor the temperature of both the tumor and the normal brain during the laser treatment,” said Joseph Petronio, MD, medical director of pediatric neurosurgery at Children’s and the doctor who led Gavin’s Visualase procedures. “The composition of (Gavin’s) tumor is unusual, including elements of bone and skin that makes it conduct heat very broadly. By being able to monitor temperature that closely, we are able to target the tumor more precisely without damaging other tissue.”

Founded in 2005, Visualase, Inc.’s system is a minimally invasive laser procedure that allows surgeons to pinpoint and treat lesions and tumors with extreme precision.

So, how does Visualase work?

  • Visualase Cooled Laser Applicator System: The system features a disposable fiber optic catheter with a built-in cooling mechanism that prevents overheating near the surface of the applicator. This laser catheter is placed through a small opening in the scalp and skull and into the center of a tumor using advanced MRI technology. Laser energy is then used to heat the tumor carefully. The system was engineered to allow for the use of higher laser powers to destroy tumors with shorter exposure times.
  • Laser generator: The generator produces light energy that is used to thermally ablate, or destroy, soft tissue.
  • Workstation: The workstation interfaces with an MRI to allow temperature control and monitoring in real time during a treatment. It also provides on-screen visuals of the tissue as it turns into a solid or semi-solid state. Because of the in-depth monitoring, the procedure results in a high level of precision and control.
  • Temperature: The time it takes to destroy parts of the tumor depends on the temperature of the laser. When set to 113-140 degrees Fahrenheit, tumor cells eventually get destroyed. Cells and tissue are destroyed immediately when the laser is between 140-212 degrees. Anything above 212 degrees, though, can cause water in the tissue and areas inside a cell to vaporize, and leads to ruptured cells and tissue components.
  • According to Visualase, once soft tissue is destroyed, or ablated, it is considered non-viable and is reabsorbed, leaving little evidence that a tumor or burn existed.

After getting its start in treating liver and prostate problems, the Visualase Thermal Therapy Subscribe to MightySystem was cleared by the Food and Drug Administration in 2007 for the ablation of soft tissue in neurosurgery. Visualase’s first minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures were performed in 2006 in Paris as part of a study for treating brain tumors.

The Visualase laser system is in use at more than 40 hospitals, nationwide, including 15 pediatric hospitals. In pediatric patients, including at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Visualase has also been used to address brain lesions that cause epilepsy.

“What’s exciting to me is the path this technology opens to areas of the brain that were closed to us before,” said Petronio. “To think we could reach a day when the term ‘inoperable brain tumor’ in children is obsolete is extraordinary.”

Source: visualaseinc.com

Five Question Friday: Mary Sachs

In honor of Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Week, this edition of Five Question Friday is about Mary Sachs, RN, CNP, who works with cystic fibrosis patients at Children’s. 

Mary Sachs, RN, CNP, has worked at Children's for about 22 years.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s for about 22 years. I started out in the pulmonary clinic as a nurse practitioner, and I continue to work in the pulmonary field doing asthma clinics in St. Paul and coordinating the cystic fibrosis program on the Minneapolis campus. I also work 2½ days per week in the general pediatric clinic. I enjoy the variety in my job and the ability to be on both sides of the river.

How has cystic fibrosis care changed over the years? Or what advances have you seen in the way we care for pediatric cystic fibrosis patients?

One of the biggest changes that happened eight years ago was the addition of testing for cystic fibrosis on the newborn screen. Whereas before, we would diagnose most children after they had issues with frequent pneumonias or infections or were failing to thrive, we now can diagnose them shortly after birth and begin preventative medications and strategies to optimize growth and maintain lung function. We used to also hospitalize children with CF at diagnosis because they were so sick. Now we usually don’t have to hospitalize children until they are older and we provide most of our education and treatments as outpatients.

What’s one thing you want people to know about cystic fibrosis?

The main thing I would like for people to know is that there is great hope that one day we truly will find a cure. The research happening around this orphan disease is truly amazing, and Children’s is a part of this research, enrolling subjects in many observational and clinical trials. New drugs studies are actually making corrective changes at the cellular level which is very exciting.  

Parents also need to know that if their child is diagnosed with CF that they are not alone. There is a team of people at Children’s who are going to be there with them every step of the way.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

There are some many wonderful memories of caring for children and their families here, but one memory reminds me that when you work here at Children’s – you have to be ready for anything and truly at the top of your game. I walked into one of our patients with CF’s room on the sixth floor one day and he was watching the “Wishing Well Show” (the previous in-house studio show). Porky-Chop (the pig puppet) was having a hog-calling contest for patients and staff. Sam (my patient) insisted that we enter the contest (and how could I say no?). We did our best and then I was off to see the rest of the patients with CF on the unit. The next day when I came onto the floor, he came running out of his room yelling “Mary, Mary! We won! We won!” He was just SO excited. He is a teenager now, and when he comes to Children’s for his annual clinic visit with the team once a year, we still laugh about it.

If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go and why?

I would go to Italy because of the wonderful culture, food and wine.

Cities 97′s Paul Fletcher to host Baby Steps 3K

Paul Fletcher of Cities 97 will be the emcee for Baby Steps 3K walk and party, taking place on Saturday, May 31, at the Minnesota State Fairgrounds. Paul and his wife, Spencer, their family and friends will walk in honor of their daughter, Elsie, who was born with Hirschsprung’s disease and continues to receive care at Children’s. All proceeds from Baby Steps 3K will go to support the neonatal program. Learn more about or register for Baby Steps 3K.

In 2013, Paul and Spencer shared their story about Elsie and the care they received at Children’s and the Ronald McDonald House:

Photo gallery: 2013 Baby Steps 3K