Category Archives: Featured

Prepare your child’s sleep for daylight saving time

Four days before daylight saving time starts, get your child to bed 15 minutes earlier the first night. (iStock photo)

Four days before daylight saving time starts, get your child to bed 15 minutes earlier the first night. (iStock photo)

Karen Johnson, APRN

Preparation is the key to minimize the impact of daylight saving time on your child’s sleep patterns. It’s a good idea to get your child into bed a little earlier in the week leading up to the time change.

subscribe_blogChange the child’s body clock

Four days before daylight saving time starts — it takes place at 2 a.m. Sunday, March 8 — get your child to bed 15 minutes earlier the first night. Your child may not actually go to sleep earlier, but by getting him or her to bed sooner, you are encouraging the body to relax earlier than usual. This will lead to falling asleep earlier, too. Make the child’s bedtime progressively earlier by 15 minutes each of the four nights before daylight saving time until it adds up to an hour the night of the time change.

Daylight saving time sleep tips

Make sure that the bedroom is dark. The big challenge for parents during daylight saving time is having the child go to bed when the sun is out. Sleep is influenced by having a dark environment, as this allows for the natural secretion of melatonin that is needed to invite sleepiness.

Calm bedtime routine

Take extra care to ensure that the bedtime routine is calm and as relaxing as it can be. A calm and regular bedtime routine is best, without debates and arguing to promote sleep.

Waking too early

Ensure that your child understands that it’s not time to get up for the day. Encourage him or her to go back to sleep. Some parents put a clock beside their child’s bed and explain what time it has to be before the child can get up for the day. If you have a toddler or young child, use a sleep clock such as the Good Nite Lite. The light is a cue that informs your child to stay in bed until the sun shines on the clock in the morning. This isn’t just effective for time changes; it also can help you train an early riser not to wake Mommy and Daddy too early in the morning and may help with bedtime battles.

Get some sun

Besides making sure to get the proper amount of sleep, early morning bright light exposure also can help set a regular sleep-and-wake pattern called a “circadian rhythm.” Eating breakfast in a bright part of your house or going for an early morning walk outside in the sun will help you and your child wake easier as well.

Daily physical activity is recommended for all children, but don’t try to wear your child out in an effort to get him or her to sleep earlier. Overtired children often take longer to fall asleep and may even resist sleep completely.

Be consistent

While your child is getting used to the new sleep schedule, stick to your usual bedtime rules and routine.

Be patient during this time adjustment as you may have a tired and grumpy child on your hands in the days after the time change. It generally takes about a week after the clocks have changed to be in a new sleeping pattern. Prepare to feel unfocused in the days after you set clocks forward. You might want to keep your family’s schedule more open in the days after daylight saving time in case you aren’t well rested.

Other tips

  • Newborn babies usually are not affected by the start and finish of daylight saving time.
  • Change clocks Saturday evening before going to bed.
  • Check the smoke alarms. Changing the batteries as a good safety rule.
  • If your child has difficulty sleeping, please contact the Children’s Sleep Center.

Karen Johnson, APRN, is a certified nurse practitioner at the Children’s Sleep Center.

“Children’s Pedcast,” Episode 2: Dr. Keith Cavanaugh on sleep health

subscribe_blogDr. Keith Cavanaugh and Karen Johnson, APRN, of the Children’s Sleep Center in St. Paul talk about healthy sleep habits for kids from newborns to teens. They cover children and schedules, sleep apnea, daylight saving time, teens and technology, and other sleep habits, both good and bad, providing information for parents and kids.

Episode 2: Dr. Keith Cavanaugh on sleep health

Listen to “Children’s Pedcast” on Podbean, iTunes, YouTube and Vimeo.

Woman to honor late grandson at Twin Cities Marathon

Team Superstars' Robyn Steinbrueck is running for her grandson, Rowan Peterson, who died March 2012. (Photo courtesy of Robyn Steinbrueck)

Team Superstars’ Robyn Steinbrueck is running the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon for her grandson, Rowan Peterson (pictured), who died March 2012. (Photo courtesy of Robyn Steinbrueck)

This is the first in a regular series about Team Superstars runners who will participate in the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon on Oct. 4 on behalf of Children’s inaugural charity running team. Learn more and join here.

Robyn Steinbrueck

What do you think of when you hear “Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota”? To me, Children’s is a place that played a beautiful and integral part of my family’s life in March 2012.

It was a Sunday I will never forget. I was having my lunch when the phone rang. My daughter, Katie, was calling to tell me news no one wants to hear. My 21-month-old grandson, Rowan, had gone into cardiac arrest. After 35 minutes of the paramedics trying to revive him, they got his heart beating, and he was on his way to North Memorial Medical Center. After frantically driving to pick up his twin brothers, Josh and Holden, we learned that Rowan had been transferred to Children’s. I knew immediately that no matter the outcome, he would receive the best care.

As the day transpired, and we arrived at the hospital, we were hopeful but realistic. Being without oxygen or a heartbeat for that long could not be good. Our worst fears were realized when the doctors told us that indeed Rowan’s brain was badly damaged from the oxygen deprivation. The doctors and nurses were absolutely fabulous as they walked my daughter and her husband, Taylor, through the last day of Rowan’s life. They were treated with incredible compassion and respect as they made decisions that no young parents should ever have to make. As each family member came to say goodbye to Rowan, we were shown such love by the staff, especially the nurses. Their final gift to Rowan was a beautiful quilt that his body was wrapped in after he died. Even in death, the thoughtfulness of Children’s shined through. Although our family was only at Children’s for a little more than a day, the memory of their care will stay with me for a lifetime.

I began running in 2002, so after Rowan’s death, it was good therapy for me to hit the pavement. As the miles passed under my feet, I found great comfort and the “road was a good listener.” Knowing that I had increased my mileage as a way to deal with the grief and its aftermath, my brother encouraged me to run a half-marathon with him. I thought that there was no way I could do it, but I am very competitive, so I took him up on the offer. I ran two half-marathons that year, and I loved every minute of it!

Grief comes in waves, and it really hit me hard in late 2013, so I increased my running. Somewhere in all those miles, I decided that I wanted to run the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon. Fast forward to October 2014, and as I was lining up in downtown Minneapolis, I looked up and saw Hennepin County Medical Center, the hospital where Rowan was born. Tears filled my eyes as I realized that I was actually doing this and that I had made it through this challenge. So on Oct. 5, I completed my first marathon! To say it was one of the best days of my life would be an understatement. The crowds, the course, the weather and my family all came together that day. I knew as soon as I crossed the finish line that I would do it again.

subscribe_blogOne of the most inspirational parts of the Twin Cities Marathon is the charity teams. Not only do they support each other through training and raise funds for their cause, but they are there for each other throughout the race. I knew that I had to be part of a team. When I heard about Team Superstars, there was no doubt in my mind that this was for me; what a great way to honor the memory of my grandson, Rowan, and to show support for Children’s.

So, my “Team Superstars” adventure begins. I am excited to raise funds and to be part of an awesome team. I look forward with great anticipation to Oct. 4, when I will run the Twin Cities Marathon as part of Team Superstars. I know that Rowan’s memory and spirit of Children’s will be with me the entire way.

Meet a familiar face from Children’s

five_question_friday111If you’ve visited Starz Café at Children’s – Minneapolis, there’s a good chance you’ve seen Latisa Tyus. She and her smile are a Starz staple. Get to know Latisa in this edition of Five Question Friday.

Latisa Tyus has been with Children's for 17 years.

Latisa Tyus has been with Children’s for 17 years.

What is your title? Describe your role.

I’m a dietary aide in Nutrition Services. Currently I work as the cashier in Starz Café.  I ring up customers, set up food and beverages and clean the tables in the café.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s for 17 years.

What do you love most about your job?

The thing I love most of all is putting a smile on people’s faces when they are having a tough day. Whether it’s a patient’s family, staff or a visitor, I love being able to make people smile.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

subscribe_blogI remember when I started here and had been here only three days. Christine from the lab came in to collect a prize from the café, and I told her I was new and had to find someone to give her the prize. She was just so nice to me, and I still remember what she was wearing. To this day we still talk about how nice it is to work in such a great community here at Children’s.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I enjoy spending time with my family and friends. I love going to sporting events and love watching them on TV. I enjoy reading thriller books and am a music fanatic. I especially like music from the ’70s-’90s.

Meet Katie

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program.

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program.

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: Katie

Age: 5

Hometown: Eden Prairie

Katie was rushed from Abbott Northwestern Hospital to Children’s after she was born 15 weeks early. She only weighed a pound and had to stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for 99 days. According to her mom, she is now happy, healthy and doing wonderfully.

When Katie grows up, she wants to be a dancer. She loves to dance.

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program. Her brother, a member of our Youth Advisory Council (YAC), even helped to design a music cart for the music therapists at Children’s.

Define safe boundaries for kids and play

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Dex Tuttle

Not long ago, I watched my toddler daughter, Quinnlyn, as she played with her favorite blocks. She picked one up, stacked it carefully on top of another, and repeated until she had a tower four or five blocks high. Without warning, she pummeled the tower while sounding her signature high-pitched battle cry, sending blocks flying in all directions. She immediately seemed to regret not having a tower and ran to pick up the blocks to start the process over.

Young children begin to understand their world by cause-and-effect experimentation. Psychologist Jean Piaget was one of the first to put this concept into organized thought.

This behavior is apparent with my daughter: “If I stick my hand in the dog’s water dish, my shirt gets wet. This pleases me and I must do this each morning, preferably after mommy helps me put on a clean shirt.”

Then, something occurred to me as I watched Quinnlyn build and destroy her tower; there is a trigger missing in her young mind that could change her behavior: She does not understand consequence, the indirect product of an effect.

I began to notice this in her other activities as well. At dinnertime, we give her a plastic fork and spoon so she can work on her motor skills. If she’s unhappy with how dinner is going, she throws her fork and spoon on the floor in a fit of toddler rage. She is then immediately puzzled by how she’ll continue her meal now that her utensils are so far away.

Subscribe to MightyAs frustrating as toddler tantrums can sometimes be for parents, I’d love to be in my daughter’s shoes. Who wouldn’t want the satisfaction of taking all those dirty dishes that have been in the sink for two days and chucking them against the wall? That decision, of course, would be dangerous and reckless and I have no desire to clean up such a mess. And, with no dishes in the house, I’d be forced to take a toddler to the store to shop for breakable things; not a winning combination.

There’s an important lesson here for safety-minded parents: Kids will explore their environment in whatever way they can. It’s like the feeling you get when you find a $20 bill in the pocket of a pair of pants you haven’t worn in months, or when you discover the newest tool, gadget or fashion. For toddlers (and us adults), it’s fun finding new things and learning new skills; it’s motivating and creates a feeling of accomplishment. However, the cognitive skills of a toddler haven’t developed beyond that cause-effect understanding.

This is why we need to consider the environment in which our young children play. I recommend giving them plenty of space and opportunity to experiment without worry of the consequence:

  • Make sure stairs are blocked off securely and unsafe climbing hazards are eliminated; encourage kids to explore the space you define.
  • Create a space to explore free of choking hazards, potential poisons and breakable or valuable items; leave plenty of new objects for children to discover, and change the objects out when the kids seem to grow tired of them.
  • Allow children to fail at certain tasks; be encouraging and positive without intervening as they try again.
  • If possible, discuss their actions and consequences with them to help them understand the reason for your rules.

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. When it’s critical, so is your choice – Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

Dex Tuttle is the injury prevention program coordinator at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and the father of a curious and mobile toddler. He has a Master of Education degree from Penn State University.

Five Question Friday: Terrance Davis

Five Question FridayIt’s Friday, and what better way to celebrate the end of the week than with a Five Question Friday profile? Meet Terrance Davis, who works on our Environmental Services team within the Minneapolis Surgery department.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children's for 25 years.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children’s for 25 years.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked here for 25 years.

Describe your role.

I clean surgery rooms between cases and stock supplies.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

I have a few favorites:

  • The surgery staff surprised me with a 50th birthday celebration.
  • Each annual craft show, which is so much fun
  • Gathering for the Environmental Services Week events

What do you think make kids great?

I have a couple answers for this one. First, they can smile at you and make your entire day better. Second, they have great energy, which can be contagious.

What is one interesting fact about you?

I was married in Las Vegas at the top of the Stratosphere tower with local TV personality “Fancy Ray” McCloney standing with me as my best man.

Five Question Friday: Kelly Patnode

Five Question Friday

Meet Kelly Patnode, patient access specialist at our St. Paul hospital, who has a love for the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn't working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn’t working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s in St. Paul for 36 years.

What drew you to Children’s?

I started in St. Paul when it was on “the hill” (across the highway from our current location) as a volunteer at the age of 13. I was a volunteer for four years. I went to school for medical office occupations, but there were no openings at that time. When I was talking to someone at Children’s, they said there was an opening for a health unit coordinator. I asked what that person did, and they explained that person works at the main desk on the floors. I asked if that was similar to a ward secretary, and they said yes. I said, “Well, I have done that job for four years, so I think I could do it!”

Subscribe to MightyWhat is a typical day like for you?

My typical day starts with making a coffee. It is just the right way to start of the day. I then clean and restart all the computers, restock supplies and then either sit at the emergency room desk and start answering the phone, make calls for the providers, put together a chart or break down a chart or start with registering patients who come to be seen in the ER.

What do you love most about your job?

Every day is a different day. What I did yesterday at my job may be totally different than the day before or today. If I can get a smile out of a patient and their parents, it just makes the day better.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

Usually I read books. But during the summertime I am busy because I also work at the Minnesota State Fair, selling box-office tickets for grandstand shows and pre-fair tickets. I have been working there for 38 years. So when I am not working at the hospital, I am at the fair. I am actually taking vacation from the hospital to work full time at the fair this year.

Children’s, Twin Cities Moms Blog host #MNvaxchat

Subscribe to MightyAugust is National Immunization Awareness Month, and Minnesota’s new immunization requirements take effect Sept. 1. With that and back-to-school mode under way, we’ll be co-hosting a Twitter chat with our friends at Twin Cities Moms Blog.

Join us for the live chat, using #MNvaxchat from 8-9 p.m. Monday, that will feature Patsy Stinchfield, PNP, director of Infection Prevention and Control and the Children’s Immunization Project at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. Children’s and Twin Cities Moms Blog will be there, too. Participants who use #MNvaxchat in tweets during the live chat qualify for a chance to win a $50 Target gift card.

ALSO: Read the Children’s vaccinations blog archive on Mighty.

UPDATE: Participation strong, informative on #MNvaxchat

Red-Vested Rockstar: Lisa Zutz

Lisa Zutz is a volunteer at Children's.

Lisa Zutz is a volunteer at Children’s.

Lisa Zutz is an aspiring pediatric RN who currently works as a phlebotomist. She has volunteered on the inpatient units, in the sibling play area and, most recently, piloted a volunteer role in the lab, which has proved highly successful. What keeps Lisa coming back week after week? The positivity and bravery of our patients.

1. Why she rocks?

I got into volunteering because of its benefits; I believe that unpaid volunteers are kind of the “glue” that holds a community or even a hospital together. Volunteering makes me happy, and knowing that I am able to put a smile on a child’s face really makes my day. Volunteering at Children’s Hospital has brought so much fun and fulfillment to my life. I want to work as a nurse with children, and I feel that the skills I gain from volunteering will make me that much better of a nurse and a person.

2. What’s your favorite thing to do outside of volunteering?

Outside of volunteering, I keep pretty busy. I am very active and love to work out; whether it’s yoga, spin, or even a nice long run. Also, I spend a lot of time with my family.

3. Do you have any kids or pets of your own?

I do not have any kids, but once a week I babysit my two nieces, Chloe and Kinzi, ages 2 and 5. We have a blast together! I spend more time with my nieces than my actual friends. We enjoy going to the Maple Grove indoor maze, making cupcakes, playing outside and making projects. We definitely keep busy all day long. I also have a kitty. His name is Luigi, and I love him with all my heart. He is a beautiful mix: half-Siamese, half-Himalayan and loves to play and run around my condo.

Subscribe to Mighty4. If you could create a new candy bar, what would be in it and what would you name it?

I am not a lover of chocolate, but for everyone who is, I would make an ice cream bar loaded with caramel, pecans, rich chocolate and, of course, ice cream. I would call it “Caramel Delight,” and it would melt in your mouth!

5. Share a favorite volunteer experience or story.

I am not sure if I can choose a favorite; I believe every experience I have had at Children’s has made me into a better person. Each child is so different and unique that every experience has its own one-of-a-kind story. It is amazing to see how brave these kids truly are; they battle so hard and are so positive despite being sick. Life is so fragile, and when you see such young children sick, you realize how life should not be taken for granted. Volunteering is so rewarding!