Category Archives: Five Question Friday

Five Question Friday: Bonnie Carlson-Green

Working as a neuropsychologist is a bit like being a detective for Bonnie Carlson-Green, PhD, LP. Learn more about her fascination with the brain in this week’s Five Question Friday.

When she was in high school, Bonnie Carlson-Green, PhD, LP, wanted to be a pediatrician but decided to major in psychology in college because she was fascinated with the study of brains and behavior.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I’ve been at Children’s for 17 years – one year less than my eldest child’s age, which makes it easy to remember!

Describe your role.

I was hired to develop the neuropsychology program, specifically as it relates to supporting the hematology/oncology patients. Many children who have central nervous system (CNS) cancers or are treated with brain surgery, craniospinal radiation, or intrathecal chemotherapies can develop neurocognitive late effects – problems with attention, processing speed, memory or other difficulties that affect their development and learning capacity. We now have six neuropsychologists across both Children’s hospital campuses and see children from age 2 years to young adults into their 20s, and sometimes 30s, for neurocognitive issues related to a variety of diagnoses and conditions.

How did you decide to go into pediatrics?

In high school, I wanted to be a pediatrician but decided to major in psychology in college because I was fascinated with the study of brains and behavior (there were no neuroscience or neuropsychology programs back in those dark ages). My psychology classes were a lot more interesting than the cutthroat pre-med classes so I gave up plans for med school. Now I feel like I get the best of both worlds: I work in a hospital setting with kids but get to spend a lot more time getting to know them over the course of their assessment.

What do you love most about your job?

I love the challenge of a mystery. Families come to me with questions about why their child is struggling. I listen to their stories for clues, do my own bit of detective work through my assessment, and then present my hypotheses to the families. It’s so gratifying for parents to have an “aha” moment in your office when all of a sudden they have a better understanding of their child. It’s also wonderful to be able to follow children over time and to see them learn to read or to do better in school because of recommendations or strategies that you suggested.

What’s your favorite meal?

My absolute favorite food in the world is Tom Yum soup. It’s a Thai soup that is a little sweet, a little sour and served with rice. Every bite tastes a little bit different than the last. There is nothing better, and it cures every ill. Unfortunately, the little hole-in-the-wall restaurant in Dinkytown that made the best Tom Yum soup in the Cities closed a number of years ago, so my husband and I were forced to learn how to make it ourselves.

Five Question Friday: Tami Koth and Morgan Koth

In honor of Nurses Week and Mother’s Day, we’re bringing you a double feature Five Question Friday. Meet Tami Koth, RN and assistant nurse manager on the seventh floor in Minneapolis, and her daughter, Morgan Koth, who works in the Children’s Foundation.

Tami Koth, RN, and daughter Morgan are Children's employees.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

Tami: I’ve worked here for 28 years.

Morgan: I have worked at Children’s for one year. Before my time in the Foundation, I worked as an intern in Genetics during my senior year of college and logged countless hours as a Children’s volunteer starting in 2002.

Describe your role at Children’s.

Tami: I am a nurse and assistant nurse manager on seventh floor, where we see both medical/surgical patients as well as hematology/oncology patients.

Morgan: As a corporate development associate for the foundation, my job is to help our corporate donors engage their organizations, employees and customers to support the patients and families of Children’s. When people band together, they can do amazing things and I love seeing that magic happen with our corporate groups.

Tami, why did you decide to go into nursing?

I was hospitalized a few times as a child. My last hospitalizations actually took place at Children’s in Minneapolis. I saw what the staff was able to provide to sick children and thought if I ever became a nurse I wanted to end up back here! My mother was a nurse and this directly influenced my decision to go into nursing.

Morgan, did your mom’s career influence your decision to work at Children’s? Absolutely. When I was in elementary school, she brought me to Children’s for “Take Your Child to Work Day” where I got to experience some of Children’s magic. Starting in the summer I was 13, I came in every Tuesday to volunteer at the hospital while my mom worked her shift. She inspired me with how thoughtful she was with patient families and the kids. For a long time, I wasn’t sure what my role would be at Children’s, but I knew early on that I wanted to be like my mom.

What do you love most about your job?

Tami: The greatest part of my job is in my role as assistant nurse manager. I gain leadership opportunities and also have my days providing patient care to our medical/surgical and hematology/oncology population; it is a great balance. Actually, one of my new favorite parts of my job is getting to have lunch with my daughter!

Morgan: My favorite moments are in the rare opportunities I get to meet with patient families at corporate events. Seeing the joy of the kids and their parents who are able to have fun and simply be a family makes this the best job in the world, hands down.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

Tami: I enjoy spending time with my husband and friends; one of our favorite summertime activities is attending outdoor concerts at the Minnesota Zoo.

Morgan: I love to stay active. You can often find me running around Minneapolis training for a few races this year. I also love to cook and try new foods, plan the next trip and enjoy the simple things with my friends and family.

Five Question Friday: Sarah Woolever

This week’s edition of Five Question Friday gives a nod to Music Therapy Week. Let’s learn more about Children’s music therapist Sarah Woolever. 

Children's music therapist Sarah Woolever writes, records and performs songs around the Twin Cities.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

1½ years

Why did you decide to go into music therapy?

I did a lot of service projects in high school and was very involved in the choir and marching band (go, drumline!). I knew I loved working with people, and I personally gained so much out of my musical experiences beyond learning how to play an instrument. Performing as a profession wasn’t for me, and I didn’t want to be in education. Music therapy was the perfect balance of both my passions.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

I have so many great memories it’s hard to pick one! Recently, I received a referral from a child life specialist in the hematology/oncology clinic. A 2-year-old girl had been in the clinic for procedures every day for the entire week. She was tired of being there and needed an intervention that would change the environment and her mood, as well as give her an alternate focus during procedures. I brought developmentally stimulating tasks that really motivated her. She smiled, sang, danced (while sitting on her bed) and successfully played new instruments. She was in charge by making choices and leading her mom and myself while playing our instruments or thinking of new words to familiar songs. She focused on the session for over 40 minutes – a really long time for a 2-year-old! It was a normalizing experience where she could be herself. During this time, her nurses were able to do their work without protests and mom was able to relax as well.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I love spending time with my husband and our 17-month-old, Declan. I love hosting dinner parties as well as practicing yoga.

What’s one interesting fact about you?

I know I just wrote that performing wasn’t for me… but I do write, record and perform songs around the Twin Cities with my bandmate. Writing music is a great outlet for me, and it keeps my musical skills sharp.

Five Question Friday: Sandy Cassidy

April 20-26 is Medical Laboratory Professionals Week. At Children’s, we have more than 120 laboratory staff members who work behind the scenes to perform and interpret more than 1 million critical lab tests every year. We’re pleased to introduce one of our lab superstars, Sandy Cassidy, who works at our St. Paul hospital. 

Sandy Cassidy has worked at Children's for 19 years.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

Nineteen years.

Describe your role.

I’m the technical specialist for the transfusion and tissue service. I make sure that the transfusion service runs smoothly by writing procedures and making sure we are compliant with all the standards from the regulatory agency that the blood bank falls under. I help develop training and competency programs for transfusion staff.

What drew you to working in laboratory sciences?

When I was in the 11th grade, we had to write a paper on a career that we were interested in pursuing. I wrote my paper on a medical lab technician. At the time, I had no idea that this was an actual job. While doing the research for my paper, I found the job really interesting so I started looking for schools that had medical lab technician programs.

What do you like best about your job?

I think what I like best about my job is that it is different every day and that there is always something challenging to do. Working with children is rewarding.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I like to spend time with my husband and two boys. My boys are busy with baseball in the spring, which keeps me busy running them back and forth between practices and games. When I’m not running my boys around, I’m busy crocheting and knitting for craft fairs that my sister-in-law and I attend all year long.

Five Question Friday: Dr. Bruce Bostrom

Bruce Bostrom, MD, his sons, John (left) and Arne (right); and Kris Ann Schultz, MD, participate in St. Baldrick's Day in 2013.

In this week’s Five Question Friday, we catch up with Bruce Bostrom, MD, as he talks about his involvement with the St. Baldrick’s Foundation and his love for Scandinavian folk dancing.

Children’s is hosting its annual St. Baldrick’s head-shaving event April 24 to raise money for childhood cancer research. Sign up to shave, donate or volunteer on the Children’s event page.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s since 1988. Initially, I was on part-time “loan” from the University of Minnesota to help the cancer and blood disorders program when Dr. Larry Singher was diagnosed with cancer. Drs. Jack Cich and Margaret Heisel-Kurth had previously come to the program from Park Nicollet as well. I became a full-time Children’s employee in 1992.

What are some of the conditions you treat?

In the early days, I treated all blood disorders and cancers in children and young adults. More recently I have specialized in leukemia, lymphoma and respiratory papillomatosis.

What inspired you to get involved with St. Baldrick’s? Tell us about your head-shaving team.

My youngest son, Arne, organized a shaving event for his fraternity at the University of Colorado in 2007. In 2009, my son, John, and I attended the event and shaved with him. We have now moved our team, “The Baldstroms,” aka “The Bald Vikings,” to the event at Children’s. One of my favorite “shaving” memories was in Boulder in 2009 when my sons and I climbed to the top of the Flatirons after shaving. I also like to say that the best thing about having my head shaved – after supporting childhood cancer research, of course – is the money I save on haircuts.

What do you love most about your job?

I work with a fantastic team of people who all are focused on giving the best care to patients with very serious and sometimes-fatal diseases. I also enjoy the long-standing relationships that form with patients and families.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I like to stay active, which is a great stress reliever. My favorite activity is Nordic (cross-country) skiing. I have skied the American Birkebeiner 30 times. My goal is to do the Norwegian version along with the Swedish Vasaloppet someday. My wife, Char, is a very accomplished Scandinavian folk fiddler, and we are members of Swedish, Norwegian and Danish folk-dance groups. As a native Minnesotan, I also enjoy Twins games and going up to the cabin.

Five Question Friday: Dex Tuttle

We love kids here at Children’s, but we’d rather see them safe at home. Dex Tuttle, our injury prevention program coordinator, tells us more about his role and gives some tips on how to prevent common household injuries in this week’s Five Question Friday.

Dex Tuttle has been the injury prevention program coordinator at Children's since August 2013.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I started in August of 2013.

Describe your role.

As injury prevention program coordinator, my job is to keep kids out of the emergency room. I plan events and prepare resources in partnership with hospital and community organizations to educate children and families about common types of injury and give them tips on what they can do to stay safe.

What do you love most about your job?

On any given day, I can be in a workshop creating a new display or activity, out in the metro area talking to community members, or at my desk planning, creating and organizing for the future. I love the flexibility and unpredictability of the job, but the most rewarding part of my work is when people who stop by and chat with me have that “a-ha” moment: when I know that the message sunk in and changed behavior. In addition, as a father of an 18-month-old, injury prevention is always on my mind in a very real way. It is great making connections with families where the conversation starts with the commonality of caring for a curious and mobile child and progresses to sharing some advice that can help them keep their own kids safe.

We’re anxiously waiting for warmer weather so we can get outside. What are some simple tips that you give parents to keep their kids safe around their neighborhoods?

A tricky part of parenting is encouraging your kids to learn through exploration and curiosity while maintaining safe behaviors. The tip sheet on this topic is about three miles long, but here is some general advice:

  • If they’re on wheels, make sure they wear a proper-fitting helmet and pads.
  • The same goes for any activity or sport; make sure their equipment is right for their size.
  • Role-play emergency scenarios as a family – severe weather, stranger danger, fire escape, etc.
  • When traveling by vehicle, ensure your child’s car seat or seat belt fits right and is installed/worn properly. ALWAYS wear a seat belt (role model good behavior) and keep kids in a proper car seat or booster until they’re 4-foot-9 or taller to ensure their seat belt fits right.
  • STAY HYDRATED. With the winter we’ve had, it’s hard to think about the weather being warm enough to be dangerous, but developing good habits around drinking plenty of water now will help create safe behavior in the future. Be sure kids understand the importance of sunscreen, too.

For more tips, visit Children’s Making Safe Simple page, but the best advice I can give as a father and educator is to involve your kids in decisions and planning for safety. Encouraging them to provide their input and incorporating their suggestions into your plan and actions helps solidify safe behavior into the future.

What’s your favorite meal?

PIZZA. If my wife would let me, I could eat pizza for every meal, every day … with a few regular breaks for hot wings, anyway.

Five Question Friday: Joanna Davis

It’s Child Life Week at Children’s, so we’re dedicating this week’s Five Question Friday to learning more about Joanna Davis, a child life specialist and the coordinator of the new Child Life Zone at our St. Paul campus.

Joanna Davis is a child life specialist and the coordinator of the new Child Life Zone at our St. Paul campus.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked here since July 2013. Before I came to Children’s, I worked at a children’s hospital in Alaska.

Why did you decide to become a child life specialist?

I knew I wanted to work with kids, but I didn’t know what I wanted to do. At the time I had never heard of the child life profession. While I was in college, my sister was doing her nursing clinicals and she followed a child life specialist around for a day. She called me up immediately after to tell me she found the perfect job for me. I looked up all I could about child life. Ever since then, I knew that’s what I wanted to do. I did everything I could to get my certification in child life, and I give all the credit to my sister, for finding me my perfect job!

We recently opened the new Child Life Zone in St. Paul. Can you tell us more about the new space?

The Child Life Zone is a state-of-the-art, therapeutic play area, located on the St. Paul campus. It’s a place that patients, siblings and families can play, hang out, have fun and just relax. Inside we have a therapeutic craft and play area, media wall and gaming area, Children’s library, Star Studio performance space and kitchen area for special events. We also offer sibling play services for kids whose brother or sister is in the hospital.

What do you love most about your job?

Working with kids and their families, and helping make their experience here at Children’s even more positive. The Child Life Zone draws kids from all over the hospital ­– we have outpatient kids that come weekly after their therapy appointments, infusion kids that come up and play from the short-stay unit while getting their meds, and inpatient kids that come down daily if they are able to. It’s really nice getting to see these kids come to a space in the hospital where they feel safe, and they really open up to you.

The theme for Child Life Week is “everyone plays in the same language.” What was your favorite childhood toy?

I loved my Easy Bake Oven! I played with it all the time until I got old enough that I started baking in the kitchen. Baking cookies is one of my favorite things to do.

Five Question Friday: Karen Jensen

March is Social Work Month, and today we’re highlighting Karen Jensen, MSW, LICSW, clinical social worker in Children’s cancer and blood disorders department.

Karen Jensen, MSW, LICSW, is a clinical social worker in Children’s cancer and blood disorders department.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

Almost two years.

Describe your role.

I work with children with brain tumors and their families. My role is to support families throughout their journey from diagnosis, through treatment and in survivorship. I help families plan their “new lives” around a child with a significant medical issue — from school to work, to day-to-day life.

What do you love most about your job?

I love the families that I work with. It is so rewarding to be able to assist families through one of the most difficult times in their lives — through the ups and downs, through the tears and joys. It is amazing to see how the children and families that I work with change throughout this journey. I feel so privileged to be able to be a part of their lives.

What is one thing you’d like people to know about social work?

The group of social workers at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota is the most professional, ethical and competent group of social workers that I have ever worked with, and I’m so proud to be a part of this amazing team!

What do you like to do outside of work?

I love to spend time with family and travel, and I enjoy photography, hiking, biking and volunteering. I have a special love for Guatemala, and I support several children there.

 

 

Five Question Friday: Danielle Horgen

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month, and to recognize it, we chose to highlight Danielle Horgen, PA-C, of Neurosurgery at Children’s. She took some time to talk about her work with patients and life outside of Children’s.

Danielle Horgen, PA-C, has been in Neurosurgery at Children's since October 2013.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I started working in Neurosurgery in October 2013.  I love working with children and their families and am so happy to be a part of the care provided at Children’s Hospital.

Describe your role.

I am a physician assistant in the Neurosurgery department. We have a great team consisting of three neurosurgeons, three nurse practitioners and one physician assistant. We all work together to make sure our patients receive quality care. My role is to interview and examine patients, order and interpret images, prescribe medications and provide education to patients and their families in both clinic and inpatient settings. I get to see many of these children in consultation, first-assist in their surgeries and manage their care during the hospital stay and follow-up visits. It is very rewarding to be present throughout the entire process!

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

It’s difficult to pick a favorite memory. We see some pretty amazing kids, all with unique stories and experiences, and certainly their own little personalities that are so fun to work with! I’ve been told some great jokes, participated in dance parties with nurses and patients on the floor and received some motivational speeches from some pretty inspiring kids. I once got a lesson from a little boy with a brain tumor about being happy and staying positive. Although this field has its share of difficult times, I feel that it’s an honor to be able to guide a family through these moments.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I have been married to my husband, Darin, for eight years, and we have a chocolate Lab named Casey. I love spending my time with these two! We also have great families in Iowa and Minnesota, including 10 nieces and nephews that we love dearly and see as often as we can.

What’s one interesting fact about you?

I played tennis, softball, gymnastics and volleyball growing up. During my senior year of high school, my tennis team won the state championship in Iowa. (It probably didn’t hurt that the two top ranked players in the state played on my team, too). Despite this, my husband, who never played tennis, still can beat me almost every time.

Five Question Friday: Bobbie Carroll

Patient safety is our top priority at Children’s. In recognition of National Patient Safety Awareness Week, Bobbie Carroll, RN, MHA, and our senior director of patient safety and clinical informatics, shares how we’re working to maintain the highest standards of safety and quality for our patients and their families. 

Bobbie Carroll, RN, MHA, is senior director of patient safety and clinical informatics at Children's.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked for Children’s 12 years.

Describe your role.

I am a registered nurse, and during my clinical career I worked in general pediatrics in the hospital and clinic settings. My interest and career moved into informatics when working on a project to help translate medical terminology for computer programmers when they were starting to develop electronic medical records. In time I started working as a project manager with a consulting firm, working on a variety of projects, which introduced me to Children’s. I started here working on a project converting our organization’s electronic systems onto our electronic medical record. During this project and after, Children’s recognized the value of informatics to assure we look at the clinical workflow and partner with staff as we develop, design and introduce technology at the bedside. Patient-safety opportunities are at the forefront of our efforts. Using technology wisely can help our organization in our pursuit of zero patient harm. I am fortunate to have the opportunity in leading our organization’s informatics team as well as patient-safety efforts.

It’s National Patient Safety Awareness Week. What kind of things does Children’s do to make sure we are providing a safe environment for our patients?

We partner with our employees to support a culture of safety at Children’s and reduce patient harm. Some of the ways we do this is learning about our stories and events reported by our employees through our safety learning reporting (SLR) process. Our Quality and Safety team reviews every SLR that is submitted and look for system gaps and opportunities that we can address to reduce the potential for error. This is a very powerful tool in assuring we have a pulse on the care we provide our patients.

Children’s was the first pediatric hospital in the U.S. to use a closed-loop medication-administration system using two-way communication between infusion pumps and the electronic medical record. The system has helped us avert potential medical errors and has advanced patient safety throughout the hospital.

Across Children’s, we also focus our attention on hospital-acquired conditions such as adverse drug events, hospital-acquired infections, pressure ulcers, patient falls and other preventable harm events. We also work with staff on the creative ideas they have to prevent harm in their care areas.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

I really wanted to be an airline “stewardess” back in the day! Now they are referred to as airline attendants and, while I respect their work, the position doesn’t seem near as glamorous as it did when I was a little girl.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I am pretty low-key outside of work and love spending time at home. I am somewhat of a “foodie,” so I like trying new recipes out on friends and family. I also like to plan our various vacation locations to experience new places. I have three beautiful granddaughters that I enjoy spending time with who constantly remind me about the important things in life.