Category Archives: Staff profiles and news

Five Question Friday: Karen Jensen

March is Social Work Month, and today we’re highlighting Karen Jensen, MSW, LICSW, clinical social worker in Children’s cancer and blood disorders department.

Karen Jensen, MSW, LICSW, is a clinical social worker in Children’s cancer and blood disorders department.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

Almost two years.

Describe your role.

I work with children with brain tumors and their families. My role is to support families throughout their journey from diagnosis, through treatment and in survivorship. I help families plan their “new lives” around a child with a significant medical issue — from school to work, to day-to-day life.

What do you love most about your job?

I love the families that I work with. It is so rewarding to be able to assist families through one of the most difficult times in their lives — through the ups and downs, through the tears and joys. It is amazing to see how the children and families that I work with change throughout this journey. I feel so privileged to be able to be a part of their lives.

What is one thing you’d like people to know about social work?

The group of social workers at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota is the most professional, ethical and competent group of social workers that I have ever worked with, and I’m so proud to be a part of this amazing team!

What do you like to do outside of work?

I love to spend time with family and travel, and I enjoy photography, hiking, biking and volunteering. I have a special love for Guatemala, and I support several children there.

 

 

A childhood goal turned into reality

In recognition of Social Work Month, we’re sharing profiles of some of our social workers and highlighting the important work they do for our patients and families. Today, meet Cathy Schacher, on-call social worker, who found her calling early in life and never looked back.

Cathy Schacher has wanted to be a social worker since she was 10.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

Since December 2009.

Why did you decide to go into social work?

When I was 10 years old and attended a week of church camp in central Iowa, I met a boy from Des Moines who told me about being “ripped” from his home by a foster care social worker. I told him that I would grow up to be the best social worker ever – even though I’d never heard of that type of job before in my small-town-America world!

What’s one thing you’d like others to know about your profession?

That we’re not all a bunch of bleeding hearts out to save the world. As a part of any team that we work within, we are able to provide a bigger-picture perspective that can help organize the information, prioritize the needs, provide insight into the rest of the story that might not come out during a 20-minute office visit, and assist with patients and clients following-through on the directions or taking other action steps that they might not otherwise be able to take without our support.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

I was able to serve during the most beautiful death experience, in which the family was at peace and was able to receive countless visits from well-known hospital staff who had walked with them through a long journey of chronic illness and hospitalizations.  When the room was packed with staff, family and friends, the song “I Can Only Imagine” came on the radio, and the patient’s mother asked everyone to stop talking while she sang that song into her child’s ear. Not a dry eye in the room! That experience taught me that I’m not “just” an on-call social worker, coming in as a total stranger, and that I was able to help the family and staff in just the right way that they needed that day.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

A social worker, since I was 10!

Five Question Friday: Danielle Horgen

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month, and to recognize it, we chose to highlight Danielle Horgen, PA-C, of Neurosurgery at Children’s. She took some time to talk about her work with patients and life outside of Children’s.

Danielle Horgen, PA-C, has been in Neurosurgery at Children's since October 2013.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I started working in Neurosurgery in October 2013.  I love working with children and their families and am so happy to be a part of the care provided at Children’s Hospital.

Describe your role.

I am a physician assistant in the Neurosurgery department. We have a great team consisting of three neurosurgeons, three nurse practitioners and one physician assistant. We all work together to make sure our patients receive quality care. My role is to interview and examine patients, order and interpret images, prescribe medications and provide education to patients and their families in both clinic and inpatient settings. I get to see many of these children in consultation, first-assist in their surgeries and manage their care during the hospital stay and follow-up visits. It is very rewarding to be present throughout the entire process!

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

It’s difficult to pick a favorite memory. We see some pretty amazing kids, all with unique stories and experiences, and certainly their own little personalities that are so fun to work with! I’ve been told some great jokes, participated in dance parties with nurses and patients on the floor and received some motivational speeches from some pretty inspiring kids. I once got a lesson from a little boy with a brain tumor about being happy and staying positive. Although this field has its share of difficult times, I feel that it’s an honor to be able to guide a family through these moments.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I have been married to my husband, Darin, for eight years, and we have a chocolate Lab named Casey. I love spending my time with these two! We also have great families in Iowa and Minnesota, including 10 nieces and nephews that we love dearly and see as often as we can.

What’s one interesting fact about you?

I played tennis, softball, gymnastics and volleyball growing up. During my senior year of high school, my tennis team won the state championship in Iowa. (It probably didn’t hurt that the two top ranked players in the state played on my team, too). Despite this, my husband, who never played tennis, still can beat me almost every time.

Five Question Friday: Bobbie Carroll

Patient safety is our top priority at Children’s. In recognition of National Patient Safety Awareness Week, Bobbie Carroll, RN, MHA, and our senior director of patient safety and clinical informatics, shares how we’re working to maintain the highest standards of safety and quality for our patients and their families. 

Bobbie Carroll, RN, MHA, is senior director of patient safety and clinical informatics at Children's.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked for Children’s 12 years.

Describe your role.

I am a registered nurse, and during my clinical career I worked in general pediatrics in the hospital and clinic settings. My interest and career moved into informatics when working on a project to help translate medical terminology for computer programmers when they were starting to develop electronic medical records. In time I started working as a project manager with a consulting firm, working on a variety of projects, which introduced me to Children’s. I started here working on a project converting our organization’s electronic systems onto our electronic medical record. During this project and after, Children’s recognized the value of informatics to assure we look at the clinical workflow and partner with staff as we develop, design and introduce technology at the bedside. Patient-safety opportunities are at the forefront of our efforts. Using technology wisely can help our organization in our pursuit of zero patient harm. I am fortunate to have the opportunity in leading our organization’s informatics team as well as patient-safety efforts.

It’s National Patient Safety Awareness Week. What kind of things does Children’s do to make sure we are providing a safe environment for our patients?

We partner with our employees to support a culture of safety at Children’s and reduce patient harm. Some of the ways we do this is learning about our stories and events reported by our employees through our safety learning reporting (SLR) process. Our Quality and Safety team reviews every SLR that is submitted and look for system gaps and opportunities that we can address to reduce the potential for error. This is a very powerful tool in assuring we have a pulse on the care we provide our patients.

Children’s was the first pediatric hospital in the U.S. to use a closed-loop medication-administration system using two-way communication between infusion pumps and the electronic medical record. The system has helped us avert potential medical errors and has advanced patient safety throughout the hospital.

Across Children’s, we also focus our attention on hospital-acquired conditions such as adverse drug events, hospital-acquired infections, pressure ulcers, patient falls and other preventable harm events. We also work with staff on the creative ideas they have to prevent harm in their care areas.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

I really wanted to be an airline “stewardess” back in the day! Now they are referred to as airline attendants and, while I respect their work, the position doesn’t seem near as glamorous as it did when I was a little girl.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I am pretty low-key outside of work and love spending time at home. I am somewhat of a “foodie,” so I like trying new recipes out on friends and family. I also like to plan our various vacation locations to experience new places. I have three beautiful granddaughters that I enjoy spending time with who constantly remind me about the important things in life.

 

Five Question Friday: Dr. Julie Lesser

It’s National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, so we caught up with Julie Lesser, MD, and medical director at Children’s Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders to learn more about her role.

Julie Lesser, MD, is medical director at Children’s Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders.

How long have you worked at Children’s? 

I arrived at Children’s in 2011 to start the eating disorder program. It was a high point in my career, and it just keeps getting better.

It’s National Eating Disorder Awareness Week. Tell us about the eating disorder program at Children’s.

The top priority of our program is to get treatments that work into the hands of patients and families. At Children’s there is a warm, positive team of highly specialized staff including: nurses, dieticians, child life associates, physical therapists, hospitalists and other specialists to help with medical issues connected to malnutrition. We see patients of all ages, including very young children, and are able to individualize care and admit patients up to college age to our program on the sixth floor of Children’s — Minneapolis. We have a separate unit for adults at Abbott Northwestern Hospital.

If you could make families aware of anything about eating disorders, what would it be?

The best way to prevent any problems with eating or weight control is to do what we call regular eating with a pattern of eating meals and snacks throughout the day, using flexible guidelines and eating enough to stay in a healthy weight range.

When you’re not at work, how do you spend your time?

I like to hang out with my family, listening to music, watching movies, walking or jumping on our trampoline. Mostly I am bossed around by the two youngest members of our family, our Jack Russell puppies, Phoebe and Phillip. My secret wish is to write a children’s book called “The Problem Solving Child,” in which our heroine faces many challenges, and a few villains, and finds surprising resources within and around herself.

If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go and why?

Some place warm, where I could wear flip-flops all day long.

For more information on eating disorder treatment at Children’s, check out our recent blog post on what you may not know about these serious illnesses.

Getting enough Vitamin D, all year long

By Molly Martyn, MD

Getting enough Vitamin D is an important part of staying healthy. Vitamin D helps with calcium absorption, and thus is a critical part of how our bodies make and maintain strong bones. Research shows that it also plays a role in keeping our immune systems healthy and may help to prevent certain chronic diseases.

Many of us get our Vitamin D from the sun and from drinking milk, but families often wonder how to help their children get enough Vitamin D to meet daily requirements.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants receive 400 International Units (IU’s) per day of Vitamin D. For children older than one year, the recommended amount is 600 IU’s per day.

Vitamin D is found in a number of foods, some naturally and some through fortification. Foods that are naturally high in Vitamin D include oily fish (such as salmon, sardines, and mackerel), beef liver, egg yolks, mushrooms, and cheese. Below are some estimates of Vitamin D levels (per serving) of a variety of foods.

TYPE OF FOOD IU’s of VITAMIN D PER SERVING
Salmon, 3.5 ounces 360 IU’s
Tuna Fish (canned), 1.75 ounces 200 IU’s
Shrimp, 4 ounces 162 IU’s
Orange Juice (Vitamin D fortified), 1 cup 137 IU’s
Milk (Vitamin D fortified), 1 cup 100 IU’s
Egg, 1 large 41 IU’s
Cereal (Vitamin D fortified), ¾ cup 40 IU’s
Shitake mushrooms, 1 cup 29 IU’s

All infants who are breast fed (and even many who are formula fed) should receive a daily Vitamin D supplement.

In addition, the majority of children do not eat diets high in foods containing Vitamin D. Thus, a Vitamin D supplement or multivitamin may be an important part of helping them meet their daily requirements. Talk to your child’s health care provider about recommendations.

The National Institutes of Health have more information on Vitamin D on their website, including Vitamin D recommendations for all age groups. 

Five Question Friday: Tanya Bailey, MD

Tanya Bailey, MD, has had some interesting jobs before she became a pediatrician at Children’s. Learn more about how she found her calling to become a doctor in this week’s Five Question Friday profile.

Describe your role. I have been a pediatrician in the Minneapolis General Pediatric Clinic since July 2012. I work full time in the clinic and also see newborn infants at the Mother Baby Center.

What drew you to Children’s? I didn’t come into medicine via a traditional path. In fact, it wasn’t even on my radar until I was almost 30 years old. Neither of my parents went to college and I don’t think a lot was expected of me academically, though the expectation that I work hard was always there. I had my first job at age 12, was employed most of the time after that, and supported myself in my late teens. I had many different jobs in my life before becoming a doctor: berry picker, cook, office assistant, accountant, gardener, Zamboni driver, resident assistant, personal care attendant, teacher’s aide and lab tech, to name a few. I was really proud at one point to say that I had a license to drive both a Zamboni and a Bobcat skid steer loader. I’ve lived in four different states across the northern part of the U.S. and my most unusual living situation was when I lived in a cabin with no running water and an outhouse when I was in college in Alaska.

What do you love most about your job? When I began looking for a job after my pediatric residency, I knew I wanted to work in a city with a diverse patient population and to have the opportunity to take care of patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings. I was initially looking to move back to the West Coast where I grew up, but told myself that if a position ever opened up at Children’s I would apply. I had enjoyed my time here as a Child Life volunteer before I started medical school and also had two wonderful rotations at the hospital as a medical student. I very much admired and was inspired by the physicians I worked with as a student and always thought they’d make great colleagues (I was right, by the way). I enjoyed the general environment at the hospital with the focus on children and their families and the diversity of the patients and the community. Now that I’m here, I love the variety that every day brings. I am never bored and I get to work with great colleagues, patients, and families. I enjoy developing relationships with families, watching their children grow up, and taking care of subsequent children.

How do you spend your time outside of work? Outside of work I enjoy working on home improvement projects both in the house and in the yard, reading (I love young adult and teen novels and get many great recommendations from my patients), cooking, and I’ve recently taken up soccer.

If you weren’t working in medicine, what do you think you’d be doing? If I wasn’t in medicine, I think I would be doing something involving gardening or cooking. I’m not sure, though. That’s what I’d do now because those are things I enjoy as hobbies. I’m not certain what I’d be doing if I’d never pursued medicine. I’d need a job that kept me busy, was challenging, and didn’t involve spending too much time sitting in one place or in too many meetings.

Five Question Friday: Dr. Chris Carter

It’s Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week, so we want to use this Five Question Friday to feature one of our cardiologists, Dr. Chris Carter, who works at the Children’s Heart Clinic at our Minneapolis campus.

Why did you go into cardiology? I went into cardiology because I enjoy the complex and varied anatomies that we see in pediatrics. The physiology and complex repairs are fascinating. I also specialize in heart rhythms (electrophysiology) because I think the rhythm disorders that often accompany a repair are also interesting. I love working with kids and their families, which is a great part of the job.

What are some of the conditions you treat? I focus more on rhythm-related issues, so I help take care of patients with things like supraventricular tachycardia (hearts that beat faster than they should). I also follow kids with congenital arrhythmia disorders – or irregular heartbeats – like long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), etc., who sometimes have implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). I work with kids who have devices like pacemakers for acquired and congenital heart block. I also see some general cardiology patients and am involved in our adult congenital heart disease clinic.

It’s Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week. If you could make families aware about anything about heart defects, what would it be? Children born with congenital disease are now living long and productive lives. As a matter of fact, there are now more adults alive with congenital heart disease than there are kids!

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s? It is hard to pick a favorite memory because there are many. I’d say one of the best was when we removed a large cardiac tumor from a patient after he had a sudden arrest at home. He left the hospital after his tumor was removed without any significant side effects. Today he is a lovely and very active young man.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? I actually have wanted to be a doctor since I was 5 years old. To this day I am not sure why as there are no other doctors in my family.

 

Five Question Friday: Pat McPherson

Meet Pat McPherson, an RN and the manager of the Special Care Nursery at The Mother Baby Center.

How long have you worked at Children’s?
I will have been a nurse for 40 years in June. I’ve spent more than half of that time at Children’s, working here for 20 years.

What drew you to pediatrics?
When I was in nursing school I was unsure where I wanted to work. When I arrived on an OB unit, it was clear to me. Going into the nursery, I fell in love with the babies and knew I really wanted to take care of them. I graduated at a time that I may not have been able to get into the nursery so I worked on OB in Duluth for one year. A year later I came back home, to Minneapolis, and worked in the nursery at North Memorial. This was when neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) were just beginning and I had the pleasure of working with John Fangman, MD, and Ron Hoekstra, MD, there. In 1980, when they came to Children’s, I also made the move and began working in the NICU.

It’s been one year since the Special Care Nursery opened in The Mother Baby Center. What’s been the best part of being in the new space?
One year ago on Feb. 4 we moved to our new unit. We now have private rooms for all families, and we love having our families be able to stay in the rooms with their babies. We also made the switch to an electronic medical record and saw a 25 percent increase in patients, which has been challenging and fun at the same time. Now that we’re a year into it, things are settling down and the nurses are enjoying the quiet space, for families and nurses, and feel more like a part of Children’s and all they provide.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?
I have so many wonderful memories from Children’s. The families have always been so grateful for the care they received. Recently, in the hallway near the Special Care Nursery, I ran into a mom and her now 16-year-old son whom I cared for when he was a baby. The times I spent getting to know families and caring for them are memories I will always have.

How do you spend your time outside of work?
I currently have a BSN and am (after this semester) three classes away from my Masters in Nursing, so outside of work I spend quite a bit of time doing school work. I do love to quilt and do it for relaxation whenever I can. I have met many wonderful friends through quilting and enjoy spending time with them.

Five Question Friday: Amy Swanson

Meet Amy Swanson, a registered medical assistant, who works at our Partners in Pediatrics clinics in Maple Grove and Rogers.

Describe your role. I am an RMA (registered medical assistant) and one of the lead support staff for evening hours. I am the medical support staff at Partners in Pediatrics and work at our Maple Grove and Rogers offices. I would be the person who rooms you, does your immunizations and lab procedures, takes your X-ray and gives you triage advice.

What do you love most about your job? The thing I love most about my job is working with kids, getting to know them and watching them grow throughout the years.

Why did you decide to go into pediatrics? I decided to work in pediatrics because I love working with kids, interacting with them and getting to hear their reaction to things. Helping people is one of my passions. I am going on a mission trip to Haiti with a group of doctors and support staff from Partners in Pediatrics in April.

How do you spend your time outside of work? I work a lot so when I do have a little spare time I love hanging out with family and friends. Traveling to warm places and spending time in the sun. I love going out and trying new places to eat. I love going shopping and I might have a problem!

What’s one interesting fact about you? I was born in Seoul, South Korea, and I was adopted at 3 months old. I am hoping that I will someday be able to go back there.