Tag Archives: Injury Prevention

Life jackets greatly reduce risk of drowning

A life jacket will provide significant protection for your little ones in and around water. (iStock photo)

A life jacket will provide significant protection for your little ones in and around water. (iStock photo)

Dex Tuttle

According to the Minnesota Water Safety Coalition, it’s estimated that half of all drowning events among recreational boaters could have been prevented if life jackets were worn.

As a parent, it doesn’t take much to convince me that the safety of my daughter is important, and more specifically, directly my responsibility. This statistic is alarming. Especially since drowning is the second-leading cause of unintentional injury-related death among children ages 14 and younger.

My daughter, Quinnlyn, loves the water. It’s easy to get caught up in her excitement and joy as she splashes around and giggles that addicting toddler laugh, so much so that I often forget the dangers inherent in water for a child who is oblivious to them.

subscribe_blogStill, as an attentive parent, it’s hard for me to believe that drowning is an ever-present danger for my little one. That’s why it’s important to consider the staggering statistics around near-drowning incidents.

Since 2001, an average of 3,700 children sustained nonfatal near-drowning-related injuries. To spare you the details, check out this article.

When protecting your children around water, there’s little to nothing that can supplement uninterrupted supervision. However, a life jacket will provide significant protection for your little ones and help instill a culture of safety in your family. Here’s how to know if it fits right (thanks to the United States Coast Guard):

  • Make sure your life jacket is U.S. Coast Guard-approved on the label on the inside of the jacket.
  • Ensure that the jacket you select for your child is appropriate for his or her weight, and be sure it’s in good condition. A ripped or worn-out jacket can drastically reduce its effectiveness.
  • Before you know it, football season will be here again (YES!), so consider the universal signal for a touchdown — after the life jacket is on and buckled, have your child raise his or her arms straight in the air. Pull up on the arm openings and make sure the jacket doesn’t ride up to the chin; it’s best to find out that it’s too loose before getting in the water.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. From the seriously sick to the critically injured, we’re ready for anything.

When it’s critical, so is your choice – Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

Dex Tuttle is Children’s injury prevention program coordinator.

“Children’s Pedcast”: Car seat safety with Dex Tuttle


subscribe_blogDex Tuttle, Children’s injury prevention program coordinator, answers questions about car seat safety and provides information about rear-, front-facing and booster seats; the factors that go into choosing the proper car seat for your child and vehicle, as well as how to properly install a child safety seat.

Children’s is sponsoring a car seat checkup at the Roseville Fire Station (2701 Lexington Ave. N.) from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday (June 20). The event is free, but you must schedule an appointment. To schedule a car seat check, please contact Esther DeLaCruz at (651) 207-2008 or [email protected]

“Children’s Pedcast” can be heard on iTunes, Podbean, Stitcher, YouTube and Vimeo.

Playing with Fire

Don't forget it's still fire

Fourth of July is typically a time of family gatherings and fun-filled outdoor activities to celebrate our nation’s freedom. But for many, celebration can quickly turn to sadness when a child is injured. Hospital emergency departments see an increase in preventable injuries to children over the Fourth of July.

Fireworks are a leading cause of injury during this holiday, and children account for one half of all firework-related injuries.

Why do parents who would normally guard their child from a three-hundred-degree oven hand them a one-thousand-degree sparkler? Is it because parents are so distracted by the beauty of the sparkles that they forget it’s still fire?

Sparklers are responsible for the vast majority of legal firework-related injuries. Parents, you can reduce the risk of injury by following some very basic safety tips:

  • Do not allow children under the age of 12 to use sparklers without very close adult supervision
  • Do not allow children to wave a sparkler
  • Do not allow children to run while holding a sparkler
  • Never light more than one sparkler at a time
  • Drop spent sparklers directly into a bucket of water

I know, it wouldn’t be a Fourth of July celebration without the sights, sounds, and smells of fireworks. But to get the most enjoyment out of this traditional activity, please be safe and protect your children from firework-related injuries.

As you prepare for this holiday I’d like to know what are some precautions you take to keep your kids safe?

Kristi Moline is the Injury Prevention Manager for Trauma Services at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.