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3-year-old aspiring ballerina stays busy despite cancer

All Lydia Fisher talks about is ballet.

The 3-year-old girl probably will get to take ballet, adding to her already busy list of activities which includes swimming lessons and gymnastics – all normal things for a friendly, outgoing little girl.

“She’s just really an active 3-year-old. When you meet her on the street, you’d have no idea she’s undergoing chemotherapy,” her mother, Jane Fisher, said. “She’s such a trooper.”

Like most families, Lydia’s cancer diagnosis caught her parents, Jane and Jeremy Fisher, off guard.

Lydia Fisher is in the maintenance phase of treatment.
Lydia Fisher is in the maintenance phase of treatment.

“She was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) on her second birthday,“ Jane said. “She had been sick with fevers and aches for 14 days before our pediatrician said we should get worked up at Children’s Hospital. We were admitted, and a couple days later it was confirmed that Lydia had ALL after a bone marrow biopsy was completed. You never really think that you are going to be ‘that family.’ Like others, we’ve tried to face it head-on.”

Jane, who works at Children’s Hospital in another department, and her family always knew it was a wonderful place for families to be treated. But seeing it from the other side of the fence has been eye-opening for Lydia’s parents.

“The whole staff is amazing,” Jeremy said. “From the doctors on down to the housekeeping staff, everyone is so good at their jobs. Everyone stops to visit with us, support us and make sure we are doing well. Many of them aren’t even caring for Lydia. Everyone gets that same treatment; we appreciate it.”

Lydia is seen at the Minneapolis campus, and her primary oncologist is Kris Ann Schultz, MD. Lydia is in the maintenance phase of treatment. Her family anticipates she’ll complete treatment in September 2015.

“This past year, I think we’ve really settled into (cancer) just being part of our life and being part of our family,” Jane said. “We try not to make it be the center of everything. We try to make her childhood as normal as it can be.”

ChildrensMN