Mighty Blog

Taking fear out of food-allergy diagnoses

Dealing with a food allergy diagnosis can feel daunting, especially for the uninitiated, due to its serious nature. But it doesn’t have to be — no parent or child has to face the new reality alone. There are doctors who specialize in food allergies, and there are groups and programs to educate and assist with how to live with food allergies.

The Food Allergy Support Group of Minnesota, founded in 2003, provides support to more than 650 members and is committed to guiding people through the confusion and fear that can come with a food-allergy diagnosis. Its mission is to empower families affected by food allergies by providing support, education and a community to build personal connections.

For the newly diagnosed, finding a board-certified allergist and learning what medications are commonly prescribed for food allergies are at the top of the list. Other actions include: knowing how to read food-ingredient labels, organize the kitchen and recipes, eat safely at restaurants, travel with food allergies, and partner with your child’s school.

All parents should know

It’s important for all parents and teachers to know about potential dangers and how to practice food safety, too. Kids with food allergies may encounter unsafe food or treats brought to school for lunch or holidays such as Valentine’s Day. Or a child’s friend visiting as a house guest may have a food allergy that requires consideration.

Preparing and taking precautions are not as difficult as you may think. Make sure you have the child’s emergency medications nearby and ask to review their Allergy Action Plan from their doctor. Here are some important steps to take if someone is showing symptoms of a food-allergy reaction:

  • Watch for symptoms, which may include hives, coughing or a tight throat.
  • Identify their symptoms on their Allergy Action Plan and determine if they are having a minor or severe reaction.
  • Give emergency medicine as directed, such as an epinephrine autoinjector (ex. EpiPen).
  • Call 911 for medical assistance and head to the hospital in an ambulance.
  • If possible, bring a smartphone or tablet to entertain your child during the wait.
  • Bring safe snacks.

Food or foe?

Eight foods account for more than 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S., according to the Food Allergy Support Group of Minnesota.

  • Milk (all dairy)
  • Eggs
  • Fish
  • Peanuts
  • Shellfish
  • Soy
  • Tree nuts
  • Wheat

The Big Quack

The Food Allergy Support Group of Minnesota (FASGMN) is hosting the ninth annual Big Quack, a family-friendly, food-allergy-safe event at the Water Park of America, from 4-8 p.m. April 19. Attendees will enjoy shorter lines as the park will be closed to the general public during this event.

The Big Quack event is a fundraiser to help support families who manage food allergies by providing special support groups and programming. Admission is $15 per person (if purchased in advance), which is roughly half of the usual price at the water park. No food allergies? No problem. All are welcome! For complete details or to order tickets, please visit FoodAllergySupportMN.org.

Food Allergy Resource Fair

The Food Allergy Resource Fair, which takes place on Oct. 12 at the Eisenhower Community Center in Hopkins, is an event open to the public that features allergy-friendly products and services from the U.S. and Canada. There are products for adults to sample and a safe trick-or-treat experience for kids with food allergies (all candy is free of the top-eight food allergens).

Find the Food Allergy Support Group of Minnesota at foodallergysupportmn.org,  Facebook, or email [email protected].