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Prepare your child’s sleep for daylight saving time

Karen Johnson, APRN

Preparation is the key to minimize the impact of daylight saving time on your child’s sleep patterns. It’s a good idea to get your child into bed a little earlier in the week leading up to the time change.

Change the child’s body clock

Four days before daylight saving time starts — it takes place at 2 a.m. Sunday, March 8 — get your child to bed 15 minutes earlier the first night. Your child may not actually go to sleep earlier, but by getting him or her to bed sooner, you are encouraging the body to relax earlier than usual. This will lead to falling asleep earlier, too. Make the child’s bedtime progressively earlier by 15 minutes each of the four nights before daylight saving time until it adds up to an hour the night of the time change.

Daylight saving time sleep tips

Make sure that the bedroom is dark. The big challenge for parents during daylight saving time is having the child go to bed when the sun is out. Sleep is influenced by having a dark environment, as this allows for the natural secretion of melatonin that is needed to invite sleepiness.

Calm bedtime routine

Take extra care to ensure that the bedtime routine is calm and as relaxing as it can be. A calm and regular bedtime routine is best, without debates and arguing to promote sleep.

Waking too early

Ensure that your child understands that it’s not time to get up for the day. Encourage him or her to go back to sleep. Some parents put a clock beside their child’s bed and explain what time it has to be before the child can get up for the day. If you have a toddler or young child, use a sleep clock such as the Good Nite Lite. The light is a cue that informs your child to stay in bed until the sun shines on the clock in the morning. This isn’t just effective for time changes; it also can help you train an early riser not to wake Mommy and Daddy too early in the morning and may help with bedtime battles.

Get some sun

Besides making sure to get the proper amount of sleep, early morning bright light exposure also can help set a regular sleep-and-wake pattern called a “circadian rhythm.” Eating breakfast in a bright part of your house or going for an early morning walk outside in the sun will help you and your child wake easier as well.

Daily physical activity is recommended for all children, but don’t try to wear your child out in an effort to get him or her to sleep earlier. Overtired children often take longer to fall asleep and may even resist sleep completely.

Be consistent

While your child is getting used to the new sleep schedule, stick to your usual bedtime rules and routine.

Be patient during this time adjustment as you may have a tired and grumpy child on your hands in the days after the time change. It generally takes about a week after the clocks have changed to be in a new sleeping pattern. Prepare to feel unfocused in the days after you set clocks forward. You might want to keep your family’s schedule more open in the days after daylight saving time in case you aren’t well rested.

Other tips

  • Newborn babies usually are not affected by the start and finish of daylight saving time.
  • Change clocks Saturday evening before going to bed.
  • Check the smoke alarms. Changing the batteries as a good safety rule.
  • If your child has difficulty sleeping, please contact the Children’s Sleep Center.

Karen Johnson, APRN, is a certified nurse practitioner at the Children’s Sleep Center.