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Meet Children’s new medical director of anatomic pathology

Megan Dishop, MD, comes to Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota via Denver. She joined our team in March. Get to know her in this edition of Five Question Friday.

What is your role and title?

I am a pediatric pathologist and one of five full-time pathologists here at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. My title is medical director of anatomic pathology, which means that I am responsible for the administrative oversight of our histology and immunohistochemistry laboratory, our surgical pathology and cytology services, and the autopsy service. In that role, I work closely with our medical director of laboratories, Dr. Carlos Galliani, our team of pathologists, and our pathologist assistant and histology supervisor, Melissa Turner, as well as our larger team of histotechnologists, laboratory information systems specialists, and administrative leaders in the laboratory and throughout our health system.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I’ve been here about five months. I started in early March and moved from Denver. A lot of people ask me why I would want to move to Minnesota — especially in light of the milder climate and the mountains — but the answer is pretty simple. I saw a really great opportunity — a chance to be part of a laboratory and an organization that is ambitious and growing, that strives for clinical excellence above all else, and that offered me a chance to work with some truly stellar, hardworking and open-minded people with an obvious commitment to a transformative mission. And the lakes are nice, too.

What do you love most about your job?

I love the challenge of recognizing rare disease. I am a visual person and a problem-solver by nature, so making diagnoses from examining tissues and cells suits my natural abilities and the analytical part of my personality. Just when you think you have “seen it all,” something new comes up that challenges the prior dogmas or challenges me to go to the books or the medical literature to understand what I am seeing. While I don’t often get to meet our patients and families, personally, I have a strong sense of mission as a diagnostician, and my role allows me to have a significant impact on treatment decisions in many different
pediatric specialties, and to contribute to the care of some of the sickest kids in the hospital, even if it is at a distance. In particular, my expertise in rare forms of lung disease enables me to see diagnostic lung biopsies from babies and children from all over the world — it’s a great feeling to be able to make recommendations and help physicians who are struggling with difficult diagnoses. There is no limit to what we at Children’s can do for the kids in our community and all over the globe.

What’s your favorite memory from working at Children’s?

Well, I have only been here a short time, but so far my favorite memories are of people reaching out their hands and introducing themselves. Everybody has been very welcoming, and I love it when people initiate conversations and tell me about what they do. It helps me to learn more about the many “niches” of the talented people that work here.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I spend time outside of work taking walks with my 11-year-old blue merle Great Dane, Samson. He is a wonderful old dog with a lot of presence and a magnetic personality. I find that he is helping me to meet all of my new neighbors, and the kids on my street just love him.

Megan Dishop, MD, is the medical director of anatomic pathology at Children's.Megan Dishop, MD, is the medical director of anatomic pathology at Children’s.