Category Archives: Featured

Five Question Friday: Meet Kirsten Granberg

five_question_friday111As Child Life Week nears a close, we want to introduce you to Kirsten Granberg, one of our child life specialists, in this edition of Five Question Friday.

Child life specialist Kirsten Granberg has worked at Children's for two years.

Child life specialist Kirsten Granberg has worked at Children’s for two years.

What is your job at Children’s? Describe your role.

I am a child life specialist that works in Sedation and Procedural Services (SPS) at Children’s – Minneapolis. My role in this department is to provide developmentally appropriate education and procedural support to patients needing some type of sedation (or no sedation, if applicable), and hopefully help minimize their stress and increase their understanding of their medical experience. I work directly with the patient and family to find out how I can best offer support for his or her procedure, whether it be with the use of distraction (iSpy or sound books, iPad, guided imagery, bubbles, etc.) or parental coaching. The staff and I work closely to determine how we can all support the child and family in the best possible way as one cohesive team, and hopefully have the patient’s and family’s experience be a positive one.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have been at Children’s for two years. When I was hired, I worked as casual staff and at a contracted emergency department in Plymouth. I began working in SPS in fall 2014 when the Child Life position was created.

What do you love most about your job?

There are many aspects that I love about my job, but the one that always makes my heart happy is when I have the chance to do medical play with a patient before a procedure or scan. I love having a variety of medical items all over the floor where the child has the time to explore and manipulate the materials, ask questions and hopefully make sense of what is going to happen. Play is the universal language for children, so by incorporating something they are familiar with and tying in the medical aspect, children begin to gain mastery and a sense of control over the situation. How empowering for the child!

subscribe_blogWhen you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

When I was a kid, I wanted to be a teacher, nurse or veterinarian. All my dolls and stuffed animals had many visits to the “hospital,” where I would treat them and nurse them back to health. We went through lots of Band-Aids in my house. One of my favorite gifts was getting a cast and crutches for my doll!

What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

I probably shouldn’t admit that I watch way too much Netflix, so besides that, I love activities outdoors, singing in my car, finding new restaurants, attending different sports events and cheering for my beloved Green Bay Packers!

Raising kids with the Internet as a co-parent

Every generation faces unique challenges in life, this generation is no exception. The main difference for new parents in 2015 is the Internet — offering a mixed bag of benefits and burdens to the ancient art of parenting. (Pimonova / iStock illustration)

Every generation faces unique challenges in life, this generation is no exception. The main difference for new parents in 2015 is the Internet — offering a mixed bag of benefits and burdens to the ancient art of parenting. (Pimonova / iStock illustration)

Jeri Kayser

While visiting my marvelous niece and her exceptionally marvelous newborn baby, she mentioned that women who have already raised their children don’t know what it’s like to be a parent in today’s world. This struck me as interesting on many different levels.

I remember having that same exact thought after having my first child; it’s only after that baby has grown a bit or you’ve had your second or third child that you can look back on this phase of your parental evolution and see that the change is less about the world and more about you. You have changed. Your priorities, your worries, your decreased expectation that sleep is something you get to choose. The world is now more demanding but infinitely more fascinating and filled with an indescribable love. Plus, you get to learn some awesome multitasking skills!

subscribe_blogSo, is it different to raise a child now?

Every generation faces unique challenges in life, this generation is no exception. I would argue that the main difference for new parents in 2015 is the Internet — offering a mixed bag of benefits and burdens to the ancient art of parenting. It’s a great place to find bargains for the stroller you want or show you how to install the car seat. But it’s equally a never-ending source of unsolicited advice and distorted parent bragging that can make any rock-solid parent feel insecure, questioning if it’s true: “Should I really only feed my child blue foods?”

When I was raising kids and standing in the checkout lane at the grocery store, the magazines would shout from their rack all of the things I could be doing to be a better parent: “How to create the perfect birthday party!” “Fun and easy Halloween costumes you can make at home!” “Teach your child 12 languages before they enter kindergarten.” Every title offering a suggestion came with the subliminal message that failure to follow the advice was evidence that you weren’t up to this whole parenting thing. It’s hard not to feel insecure when you’re so motivated to be perfect for your obviously perfect child while residing in the imperfect package of a human being.

I could step away from the parenting magazines in the checkout line, maybe read up on what alien has married what celebrity, but you can’t really avoid the Internet. Those photos of your friends and relatives in gorgeously orchestrated family bliss are still going to pop up in your feed.

Sigh.

Mining the Internet for truly helpful information that empowers your parenting mojo instead of inviting in trolls who create chaos with your self- esteem requires some thoughtful navigation.  The Internet is great for advice about things that have easily verifiable facts, like “where can I find an indoor playground?” Questions that have long-term consequences like “how do I get my kids to get along with each other?” are best answered by the posse of people closest to you — your friends and family as well as professionals educated in the field of question.

Important parenting advice should be gathered from people important to you, people who are invested in you for the foreseeable future who will be around to be held accountable for their advice. Sift through that advice and take from it what seems right to you. Trust yourself. Yes, others have sailed the parenting seas, but this is your journey and you are the captain. Respecting yourself and recognizing there is no perfect parent smoothes the waters and makes the trip so much more fun!

Jeri Kayser is a child life specialist at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

The importance of play — for kids and adults

Hands-on play, where a child uses his or her imagination and ideas to self-discover, creates the best learning environment. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Jeri Kayser

When people try and remember the name of my profession, child life specialist, they often shorten it to “play lady.” That used to bug me when I was a young professional and ready to solve all of the world’s problems, but now I recognize the compliment. We breathe, drink and eat to stay alive – we play to bring forth a reason for all of that effort. Play is how we learn about our world, practice that knowledge and foster our sense of well-being and personal joy; it’s an honor to promote play in the world of health care, but it’s not without its challenges.

One current challenge is tied to the hot topic in popular culture about the value of gaming devices. Is playing a game on a smartphone when you’re 2 years old considered quality play? Short answer: No. The Academy of Pediatrics recommends no screen time for kids 2 and younger and only one to two hours a day for older children. The core aspect of the definition of “play” is that it’s self-directive. You’re deciding what you’re going to do with whatever you’re interacting with. One of the problems with electronic games is that game designers have done most of that for you.

Your toddler recognizes the status that phone holds, and it works for a bit to keep a child distracted from the fact that he or she is in the hospital or in a long checkout line at the grocery store.

subscribe_blogSo what can we use to help guide our decisions to promote healthy play? A great way to look at this is similar to how we all work to promote healthy choices for our diet. Potato chips are fine for an occasional treat, but we wouldn’t want to eat them all the time. If we did, we’d feel awful. Video games kind of are the junk food of play. The more the play requires from the child, the better the value and healthier the choice.

I notice this in the hospital when I come into a room to meet with a family about what to expect with surgery. People often are busy with an electronic device, but as soon as we start to talk, the interest is there to engage and the devices get turned off. When I bring a toy or some arts and crafts activities, kids always gravitate towards that; they want what they need.

I used to work in a summer daycare program for school-aged kids. We would spend the morning on a field trip and the afternoon at a beach. The director wanted us to provide structured activities for the kids in the afternoon, but we quickly learned that the combination of water, sand and friends led to a more-creative, imaginative and enriched play than anything with which we could have come up. Hands-on play, where a child uses his or her imagination and ideas to self-discover, creates the best learning environment.

I heard an interesting story on public radio on my long commute home. At the electronic show in Austin, Texas, at the South by Southwest conference, the big news at the conference was the “Maker Movement,” stressing the importance of hands-on play to promote understanding of how our world works. They interviewed an inventor, Ayah Bdeir, who created a toy of electronic bits that fit together with magnets, creating circuits. With this process, you can make all kinds of fun things. He explained the value of this explorative play by stating, “We need to remember that we are all makers and touching things with our hands is powerful and inspiring.”

In another century, another scientist noted the same thing. Albert Einstein declared, “Play is the highest form of research.”

Self-directed play offers the healthiest value for our play “diet,” and this extends throughout our lives. We all need to play. As I wrote this, I overheard a conversation between two anesthesiologists talking about how they used play to help them cope with life stressors. One likes his guitar, while the other enjoys making remote-control helicopters.

This important fact, one of the highest forms of self-care, needs to be part of the planning of how we provide health care. Play is important for all age groups, not just those adorable preschoolers. We need to incorporate this in everything we do, for teens, parents and staff.

Late Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw said it best: “We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.”

Jeri Kayser is a child life specialist at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

“Children’s Pedcast,” Episode 4: Child life specialists on taking medicine


On Episode 4 of “Children’s Pedcast,” child life specialists Jeri Kayser, Sarah Magnuson and Sam Schackman join the show to talk about the different challenges parents face with kids of all ages when it comes to taking medicine, both short and long term. The trio provide tips and strategies for help and success during the most difficult times when med taking seems impossible.

subscribe_blogIdeas for medicine taking

Developmental considerations

Infants: Birth to 18 months

  • Babies typically will react with any new flavor in their mouths; it’s important to avoid labeling the medicine as “yucky tasting” in response.
  • Be mindful of how you present the medicine, a positive attitude goes a long way.
  • Start practicing saying out loud what the medicine will be doing for your baby as you give it — it’s a good habit to start: “This medicine is going to help your ear feel better.”

Toddlers: 18 months to 2½ years

The hallmark of toddlers is to say “no” to anything and everything. If it’s not their idea, it’s probably not a good idea to them! Medicine fits neatly into something that is not their idea, so it helps to show them exactly why it should be their idea. “You told me your ear hurts and you want it to feel better, right (wait for the ‘yes’)? This medicine will make it feel better, but only if it gets down to your tummy.”

Pre-schoolers: 2½-5 years

They have had some life experience, tasted medicine and may not be excited to repeat that experience. Also, they are age-appropriately seeking control and recognize the opportunity for control when they zip their lips. Find ways to add fun as well as choices. Choices help a child regain control and still meet the goal of taking the medicine. Routine works well to help understand the time-limited nature of the experience. Sticker charts add a sense of accomplishment and measurement of progress.

School-age children: 5-12 years

Kids this age are old enough to understand how the medicine will help them but can become easily frustrated if they are struggling with the taste of medicine or difficulty swallowing a pill. Practicing with similar-sized candy is helpful if you work up in size to the size of the prescribed pill. Start with something small, like a Tic Tac, then incrementally larger candies until you get to the desired size. Finding opportunities to point out to your child how the medicine is helping them adds to their motivation.

Teens

Many teens don’t like to interrupt their lives or appear different in any way from their peers. It can be a challenge to coordinate their schedules with the requirements of taking a prescription. It’s helpful to walk through what it would be like to take the medicine and coordinate any necessary adjustments with your physician and pharmacist. The school nurse can be a great resource to make sure the medicine is taken. If your teen has a long-term medicine to take, this is a great time to teach them how to be responsible with their meds.

Behavioral support

  • Implement a routine for taking the medications: sitting in a certain chair, drinking something of their choice right after, etc.
  • Incorporate medical play with small candies and a doll or stuffed animal to practice the routine.
  • Give appropriate choices: Syringe or cup? Sitting at the table or sitting on the couch? Explain why the medicine is important. Older kids can understand if they take the medicine, their ear won’t hurt, etc.
  • Parents: Try to keep a positive attitude. Your child will be able sense your frustration, which will only make the situation more difficult. Work together toward your end goal.
  • Take the child to the store to buy a special cup and drink choice to chase after medicine.
  • Be honest. Never tell your child medicine is candy or try to hide medicine in food (it’s OK to use food/liquid to help administer the medicine — just make sure your child knows the medicine is there).
  • Use visual supports to help a child understand medicine routines. For instance, visual supports can help a child learn each important step to swallowing a pill and can even be used to help make the connection between taking the medicine and getting to enjoy that favorite activity (by showing a picture of a child taking medicine paired with a picture of the activity). You can download the ATN’s free Visual Supports toolkit.

Dealing with taste

Check with your physician and pharmacist on how medicine should be taken and what you can take it with before you try any of these suggestions.

  • Have a frozen treat (popsicle, etc.) or chew on ice prior to taking medicine. This “numbs” your taste buds to minimize taste.
  • When possible, crush it up and put it into pudding, applesauce, etc.
  • Mix crushed pills with frozen juice concentrate (numbs the taste buds and masks the taste). Grape, raspberry and lemonade are stronger flavors.
  • Mix crushed pills with maple syrup or coat the tongue with maple syrup to mask the taste.
  • Put the whole pill in a small spoonful of Jell-O.
  • Wash the tongue, scrub the taste buds if the taste is lingering, or pretend a wet wash cloth is an ice cream cone and lick it.
  • Blackberries can be used as edible medicine cups. The pill fits quite well in that little hole, and if your child is a fruit eater it makes it easier.

Other resources on the Web

“Children’s Pedcast” can be heard on iTunes, Podbean, Stitcher, YouTube and Vimeo.

Five Question Friday: Psychologist works to help children, families

five_question_friday111Don Brunnquell, LP, has a number of stories and memories from his time at Children’s. We’d like you to get to know the Children’s mainstay in this edition of Five Question Friday.

Don Brunnquell, LP, has worked at Children's for 35 years.

Don Brunnquell, LP, has worked at Children’s for 35 years.

What is your title? Describe your role.

My formal title is resident ethicist and director of the office of ethics. I am a psychologist with additional training in ethics. This means I am the first responder and coordinate the work of the ethics committee in bioethics education, policy and consultation. On a day-to-day basis, that means things like talking with family and staff about complex decisions for a patient such as choosing an invasive surgery for a child with a life-threatening disease, and working on education such as grand rounds or unit in-services around moral dilemmas and distress, and working on policies that clarify how we deal with complex values issues such as “Do Not Attempt Resuscitation.”

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I’ve worked at Children’s for 35 years, although I was a psychology intern for one year prior to becoming an employee. I started at Children’s – Minneapolis when there were about 450 employees. I continue to work here because I work with a lot of wonderful and dedicated people.

subscribe_blogWhat do you love most about your job?

I love being with children and their families, and working to help them have as good a life as they can. Helping people sort through, make sense of and make peace with decisions that are intellectually and emotionally tough is very rewarding. No two days are the same.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

There are so many! One of my favorites was receiving a letter from a parent whose child had died, who had struggled with decision-making, and at times was very suspicious and angry; she thanked us for how we had stood by her and helped her face something that is unimaginable for a parent. Another happened recently when a new employee approached me and said that I had worked with her family about 20 years ago when her sister was ill, and the good experience here in a terrible time helped guide her choice to work in health care.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

Balance is important. It used to be with my kids, but now that they are grown it’s music (I play every week with two friends in an acoustic folk band called Stealin’ Home), writing poetry, fantasy baseball (in the same league for more than 20 years), and cycling or cross-country skiing. Also, I am a huge Gopher basketball and Twins fan.

Meet Katie

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program.

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program.

When exploring the impact of supporting a child’s tomorrow, we went straight to the source: our patients. We asked several to share how Children’s has played a role in their life today, and what they look forward to in their tomorrow. This is what we learned.

Q4_mighty_buttonName: Katie

Age: 5

Hometown: Eden Prairie

Katie was rushed from Abbott Northwestern Hospital to Children’s after she was born 15 weeks early. She only weighed a pound and had to stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for 99 days. According to her mom, she is now happy, healthy and doing wonderfully.

When Katie grows up, she wants to be a dancer. She loves to dance.

What Katie loves most about Children’s is the music therapy program. Her brother, a member of our Youth Advisory Council (YAC), even helped to design a music cart for the music therapists at Children’s.

Define safe boundaries for kids and play

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy. (iStock photo / Getty Images)

By Dex Tuttle

Not long ago, I watched my toddler daughter, Quinnlyn, as she played with her favorite blocks. She picked one up, stacked it carefully on top of another, and repeated until she had a tower four or five blocks high. Without warning, she pummeled the tower while sounding her signature high-pitched battle cry, sending blocks flying in all directions. She immediately seemed to regret not having a tower and ran to pick up the blocks to start the process over.

Young children begin to understand their world by cause-and-effect experimentation. Psychologist Jean Piaget was one of the first to put this concept into organized thought.

This behavior is apparent with my daughter: “If I stick my hand in the dog’s water dish, my shirt gets wet. This pleases me and I must do this each morning, preferably after mommy helps me put on a clean shirt.”

Then, something occurred to me as I watched Quinnlyn build and destroy her tower; there is a trigger missing in her young mind that could change her behavior: She does not understand consequence, the indirect product of an effect.

I began to notice this in her other activities as well. At dinnertime, we give her a plastic fork and spoon so she can work on her motor skills. If she’s unhappy with how dinner is going, she throws her fork and spoon on the floor in a fit of toddler rage. She is then immediately puzzled by how she’ll continue her meal now that her utensils are so far away.

Subscribe to MightyAs frustrating as toddler tantrums can sometimes be for parents, I’d love to be in my daughter’s shoes. Who wouldn’t want the satisfaction of taking all those dirty dishes that have been in the sink for two days and chucking them against the wall? That decision, of course, would be dangerous and reckless and I have no desire to clean up such a mess. And, with no dishes in the house, I’d be forced to take a toddler to the store to shop for breakable things; not a winning combination.

There’s an important lesson here for safety-minded parents: Kids will explore their environment in whatever way they can. It’s like the feeling you get when you find a $20 bill in the pocket of a pair of pants you haven’t worn in months, or when you discover the newest tool, gadget or fashion. For toddlers (and us adults), it’s fun finding new things and learning new skills; it’s motivating and creates a feeling of accomplishment. However, the cognitive skills of a toddler haven’t developed beyond that cause-effect understanding.

This is why we need to consider the environment in which our young children play. I recommend giving them plenty of space and opportunity to experiment without worry of the consequence:

  • Make sure stairs are blocked off securely and unsafe climbing hazards are eliminated; encourage kids to explore the space you define.
  • Create a space to explore free of choking hazards, potential poisons and breakable or valuable items; leave plenty of new objects for children to discover, and change the objects out when the kids seem to grow tired of them.
  • Allow children to fail at certain tasks; be encouraging and positive without intervening as they try again.
  • If possible, discuss their actions and consequences with them to help them understand the reason for your rules.

Encouraging the learning and exploration process will increase your child’s confidence and creativity, and defining safe boundaries and rules will keep you both happy.

At Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, we care for more pediatric emergency and trauma patients than any other health care system in our region, seeing about 90,000 kids each year between our St. Paul and Minneapolis hospitals. Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis is the area’s only Level I pediatric trauma center in a hospital dedicated to only kids, which means we offer the highest level of care to critically injured kids. When it’s critical, so is your choice – Children’s Level I Pediatric Trauma Center, Minneapolis.

Dex Tuttle is the injury prevention program coordinator at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and the father of a curious and mobile toddler. He has a Master of Education degree from Penn State University.

Five Question Friday: Terrance Davis

Five Question FridayIt’s Friday, and what better way to celebrate the end of the week than with a Five Question Friday profile? Meet Terrance Davis, who works on our Environmental Services team within the Minneapolis Surgery department.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children's for 25 years.

Terrance Davis has worked at Children’s for 25 years.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked here for 25 years.

Describe your role.

I clean surgery rooms between cases and stock supplies.

Do you have a favorite memory from working at Children’s?

I have a few favorites:

  • The surgery staff surprised me with a 50th birthday celebration.
  • Each annual craft show, which is so much fun
  • Gathering for the Environmental Services Week events

What do you think make kids great?

I have a couple answers for this one. First, they can smile at you and make your entire day better. Second, they have great energy, which can be contagious.

What is one interesting fact about you?

I was married in Las Vegas at the top of the Stratosphere tower with local TV personality “Fancy Ray” McCloney standing with me as my best man.

Five Question Friday: Kelly Patnode

Five Question Friday

Meet Kelly Patnode, patient access specialist at our St. Paul hospital, who has a love for the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn't working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

When she isn’t working in our St. Paul hospital, Kelly Patnode enjoys reading and helping out at the Minnesota State Fair.

How long have you worked at Children’s?

I have worked at Children’s in St. Paul for 36 years.

What drew you to Children’s?

I started in St. Paul when it was on “the hill” (across the highway from our current location) as a volunteer at the age of 13. I was a volunteer for four years. I went to school for medical office occupations, but there were no openings at that time. When I was talking to someone at Children’s, they said there was an opening for a health unit coordinator. I asked what that person did, and they explained that person works at the main desk on the floors. I asked if that was similar to a ward secretary, and they said yes. I said, “Well, I have done that job for four years, so I think I could do it!”

Subscribe to MightyWhat is a typical day like for you?

My typical day starts with making a coffee. It is just the right way to start of the day. I then clean and restart all the computers, restock supplies and then either sit at the emergency room desk and start answering the phone, make calls for the providers, put together a chart or break down a chart or start with registering patients who come to be seen in the ER.

What do you love most about your job?

Every day is a different day. What I did yesterday at my job may be totally different than the day before or today. If I can get a smile out of a patient and their parents, it just makes the day better.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

Usually I read books. But during the summertime I am busy because I also work at the Minnesota State Fair, selling box-office tickets for grandstand shows and pre-fair tickets. I have been working there for 38 years. So when I am not working at the hospital, I am at the fair. I am actually taking vacation from the hospital to work full time at the fair this year.

Children’s, Twin Cities Moms Blog host #MNvaxchat

Subscribe to MightyAugust is National Immunization Awareness Month, and Minnesota’s new immunization requirements take effect Sept. 1. With that and back-to-school mode under way, we’ll be co-hosting a Twitter chat with our friends at Twin Cities Moms Blog.

Join us for the live chat, using #MNvaxchat from 8-9 p.m. Monday, that will feature Patsy Stinchfield, PNP, director of Infection Prevention and Control and the Children’s Immunization Project at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. Children’s and Twin Cities Moms Blog will be there, too. Participants who use #MNvaxchat in tweets during the live chat qualify for a chance to win a $50 Target gift card.

ALSO: Read the Children’s vaccinations blog archive on Mighty.

UPDATE: Participation strong, informative on #MNvaxchat