Articles from James Burroughs, senior vice president, government and community relations and chief equity and inclusion officer at Children’s Minnesota

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Equity mistakes, Part 2. We can’t say that, or can we?

We all make mistakes. In Part 2 of this blog, our kid experts discuss more common mistakes related to equity and identity.

Equity mistakes, Part 1. We can’t say that, or can we?

We all make mistakes related to equity and identity. Two of our kid experts discuss several common mistakes and how to handle them.

Equity action and our new mental health unit

We want all kids to feel safe and supported in our new mental health unit. Here's how we're practicing culturally humble and knowledgeable care.

Boys do cry: Black male mental health matters

We never talked about "trauma" when I was growing up. Here's how we can, and why we must, do better for young people today.

My sickle cell warrior

My daughter has sickle cell disease. This is how she has changed my life.

In defense of Boston Children’s

Patients and families at children’s hospitals are under attack and that is not OK.  

What our students need this school year

How can we help our young people as they head back to school this fall? I asked two education kid experts to share their thoughts with us.

The irony of Black blood donation

We need more Black blood donors. To understand why, you need to know the history.

Children’s Minnesota DEI executive shares expertise during forum on recruiting and retaining professionals of color

James Burroughs, senior vice president, government and community relations, chief equity and inclusion officer at Children’s Minnesota, was selected for a panel discussion focusing on the importance of recruiting and retaining professionals of color.

Too important to ignore

If you’re not convinced yet that there’s a mental health crisis in Minnesota, maybe this statistic will persuade you: In 2021, Children’s Minnesota saw a 30% increase in the number of kids coming to our emergency departments with mental health concerns. Let that sink in for a moment. And then there’s this: In 2021, for the first time, suicidal ideation was one of the top 5 diagnoses at Children’s Minnesota. The numbers are even tougher for certain groups of kids.