Children’s latest stories in the news and press releases from across our hospitals and clinics.

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Do Your Kids Know How To React To A Smoke Alarm?

Dr. Keith Cavanaugh with Children’s Minnesota Sleep Center explained why children may be less likely to respond to smoke alarms than adults.

Hockey is more than a game for terminally ill teen

Children’s Minnesota patient Josh Karels, age 15, has a rare, terminal immune disorder that attacks his body’s major organs. Despite having a disease that could take his life at any moment, Josh continues to play hockey and uses the sport as his motivation to live life to the fullest.

Study: Health care providers penalized for patient hardships

Gretchen Cutler, scientific investigator at Children’s Minnesota, co-authored a study published in JAMA Pediatrics that found some hospitals face unfair penalties due to certain patient populations’ socioeconomic factors with pay-for-performance payment models.

MD News highlights Children’s Minnesota cardiovascular program and the Children’s Heart Clinic

Minnesota MD News highlighted Children's Minnesota cardiovascular program and the Children's Heart Clinic.

Are drugs really the remedy for toddlers?

Dr. Carrie Marie Borchardt discusses the recent increase in antipsychotic medications written for children ages 2 and younger.

Hospital’s mHealth Project Finds Value in Fitbit Data

Dr. Laura Gandrud, pediatric endocrinologist at Children’s Minnesota, was interviewed by mHealth Intelligence about Children’s Minnesota’s type 1 diabetes pilot program that uses Fitbits to collect patient data.

Peter Harrington’s road to recovery

Children’s Minnesota patient Peter Harrington, age 15, suffered a nearly fatal sinus infection in 2015. Peter spent most of the summer in the hospital, but is now back to playing hockey.

NICU Patient Hearing at Risk

A new study from Children's Minnesota found that ventilators emit noise that travels not only through the air, but also through bone conduction, which may contribute to hearing loss for babies in the NICU.

Zika virus

What Minnesotans need to know about Zika virus

Zika primarily infects humans and other primates and is spread through bites by the Aedes mosquito species.

Patsy Stinchfield weighs in on how the Zika virus affects Minnesotans

Learn more about the mosquito-borne Zika virus from Patsy Stinchfield, director of infection prevention and control at Children’s Minnesota.