Filter by:

Selective intrauterine growth restriction

What is selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR)?

The Great Candy Run

October 14, 2017, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., St. Paul

The Great Candy Run is an event to raise funds for and awareness of fetal syndromes and is coming to the land of 10,000 lakes. Participants and spectators alike will enjoy the fun and fast 5K course designed with walkers and runners in mind, a family festival featuring games, activity stations, face painting, great refreshments, giveaways and much more.

Intestinal Atresia

Intestinal atresia (ah-TREE-zha) is a term used to describe a broad spectrum of birth defects that result in a blockage in either the small or large intestine.  During normal fetal development, the intestines remain unobstructed, allowing contents from the stomach to flow freely through the baby’s digestive tract (Figure 1). When a blockage (atresia) occurs, however, the intestines lose some or all of their ability to absorb nutrients and to push food and fluids through the baby’s digestive tract.

Duodenal atresia

During normal fetal development the duodenum — the upper part of the small intestine — remains unobstructed, allowing contents from the stomach to flow freely through the baby’s digestive tract (Figure 1). Duodenal atresia (DWAH-de-nal ah-TREE-zha) is a condition that occurs when a portion of the duodenum doesn’t form. This condition results in a blockage (atresia) that stops food or fluid from leaving the baby’s stomach (Figure 2).

Esophageal Atresia

Tracheoesophageal fistula (TRAY-key-oh-ee-SOF-ah-GEE-all FIS-chu-la) and esophageal atresia (ee-SOF-ah-GEE-all ah-TREE-zha) are birth defects that affect parts of the upper digestive tract. Most of the time, these conditions occur together. Esophageal atresia repair and tracheoesophageal fistula repair are available at the Midwest Fetal Care Center.

William Starks being pushed on a swing

Meet the Stark Family: William Today

See William's progress today after doctors at the Midwest Fetal Care Center give him a new opportunity to thrive.

Related image for article, Meet the Stark Family: William’s Surgery

Meet the Stark Family: William’s Surgery

Doctors at the Midwest Fetal Care Center diagnosed William with a congenital lung condition that if left untreated, may cause future complications.

Stark parents waking outside with dog

Meet the Stark Family

A routine 20-week ultrasound revealed more than this Minneapolis couple's baby's gender.

Giving

Fetal medicine is at the pioneering edge of pediatric health care. Babies still in the womb with serious illnesses and conditions once faced a lifetime of struggle and chronic issues. Now, when treated early, we have hope of reducing or fully eliminating the burden of chronic illness from their lives. This possibility is fueled by donors like you.

Couple in a ultrasound appointment

Midwest Fetal Care Center physician explains open fetal surgery

Dr. Lillegard explains more about the new open fetal surgery program and the Midwest Fetal Care Center’s service