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Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota Opens New Cardiovascular Center in Minneapolis

New facility is the only one of its kind in the Upper Midwest, integrating all pediatric cardiovascular services onto one floor

Minneapolis/St. Paul (April 5, 2010) – Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota is opening a new world-class Cardiovascular Center—the only one of its kind in the Upper Midwest—that integrates all pediatric cardiac services in one location. The new Cardiovascular Center reflects Children’s dedication to family-centered care with all private patient rooms with the latest in technology for both the patient and care team, a state-of-the-art hybrid operating room, and 24/7 access to specially trained cardiac intensivists to ensure the best possible care for patients.

The new Cardiovascular Center allows Children’s, the largest provider of pediatric cardiovascular services in the region, to take its excellence in pediatric care to an even higher level.

“After years of planning, we can now provide care in a space that matches our high quality care services and is specifically designed to meet our patients’ unique needs,” said David Dassenko, MD, medical director of the Cardiovascular Center at Children’s. “Children’s is a national leader in terms of delivering the best outcomes for the most difficult cardiac issues and we’re fortunate to have this new, world-class facility in which to continue carrying that out.”

The Cardiovascular Center concentrates all cardiac services on one floor, including admissions, diagnostics, outpatient and inpatient cardiac catheterization, surgical procedures, discharge services, and follow-up care services. A patient will stay on the same unit from the time they are admitted to discharge, optimizing the continuity of patient care and minimizing risk involved in moving patients from floor to floor post-surgery.

In addition, the new center features advanced technologies such as full access to the SOMATOM Definition Flash CT scanner, which minimizes radiation exposure for patients while obtaining optimal images. The facility also features a dedicated hybrid operating room-one of only a few nationwide, a cardiac catheterization lab, and a standard operating room, all of which provide the best available technologies for patients.

Along with the technical features, Children’s cardiac care model provides patients access to Children’s top quality medical staff, including five on-site cardiac intensivists devoted to pediatric cardiac care 24/7. No other facility in the region offers this service. The center is also staffed with specially trained cardiac nurses, respiratory care staff, and a pain specialist who will join the team soon.

About Children’s

Serving as Minnesota's children’s hospitalSM since 1924, we provide 332 staffed beds at our two hospital campuses in St. Paul and Minneapolis. An independent, not-for-profit health care system, Children’s provides care through over 14,000 inpatient visits and more than 200,000 emergency room and other outpatient visits each year.

Minnesota Sports and Entertainment COO, Matt Majka, Joins Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota Board of Directors

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (March 17, 2010) – Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota announced today that Matt Majka, chief operating officer for Minnesota Sports and Entertainment (MSE) has been named to the Children’s board of directors. MSE is a regional sports and entertainment company that runs a number of business operations, including the Minnesota Wild.

“We’re very happy to welcome Matt Majka to the Children’s board,” said Alan L. Goldbloom, MD, president and CEO of Children’s of Minnesota. “We’ve been fortunate to have a great relationship Matt Majka
with the Minnesota Wild over the years and I have had the pleasure of getting to know Matt through Wild events. I know he will bring valuable perspective and great enthusiasm to the board.”

One of Majka’s responsibilities with the Wild is to help the franchise maintain its uniquely strong connection with its fan base. Part of this involves reaching out to the community and supporting the assets that make Minnesota a great place to live. The Wild Foundation has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for Children’s through the annual Wild About Children dinner, where Wild players serve as waiters for the diners. The Wild also sponsor a teen activity room at the St. Paul hospital, and Wild players regularly visit patients at Children’s.

“Our work with Children’s has been an important way for the Wild to give back to the community,” said Majka. “It has also been rewarding for me on a personal level. Children’s has a great story to tell in this community and as a board member I hope to be able to find additional ways to shine a light on all they do for families.”

Majka is a graduate of the University of Minnesota. He and his wife, Kym, live in Wayzata with their two sons, Sam and Nick.

About Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota
Serving as Minnesota’s children’s hospital since 1924, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota has 332 staffed beds at its two hospitals in St. Paul and Minneapolis. An independent, not-for-profit health care system, Children’s of Minnesota provides care through more than 14,000 inpatient visits and more than 200,000 emergency room and other outpatient visits every year. Children’s is the only Minnesota hospital system to provide comprehensive care exclusively to children. For more information, visit www.childrensmn.org.

APi Group, Inc. CEO Russell Becker Joins Board of Directors of Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota

APi Group, Inc. CEO Russell Becker Joins Board of Directors of Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota Russell Becker

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (March 17, 2010) – Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota today announced the appointment of Russell Becker to its board of directors. Becker has deep roots in Minnesota. He grew up on the Iron Range in Virginia, Minnesota, and now lives near the Twin Cities with his wife and three sons. He brings to the board a passion for helping improve the lives of young people.

Russell Becker
“We are very happy to welcome Russ Becker to our board,” said Alan L. Goldbloom, MD, president and CEO of Children’s of Minnesota. “Russ has been involved with Children’s for years and he has always been enthusiastic about our mission and role in this community. As a member of our board, he’ll play an important role in our continued efforts to provide the best possible care for patients and families in Minnesota.”

Becker is president and CEO of APi Group, Inc., a billion dollar holding company for more than 32 independent construction and construction-related businesses. He says he first became interested in Children’s thanks to the late Jim Ryan, the former chair of the Children’s board who was a mentor for Becker. Becker says Ryan’s passion for Children’s was contagious.

“Once I spent time at the hospitals and watched the battles the kids were going through, it became kind of a no-brainer for me to want to get involved,” said Becker. “Children’s is doing so much right now to improve the quality of life at the hospitals for the kids and families. It’s an easy decision for me to get behind their efforts and to do what I can to help.”

Becker’s wife, Trish, is also a strong supporter of Children’s. She is serving as co-chair for this year’s Thank God for Kids Gala to benefit the Cancer Kids Fund.

In addition to serving on the Children’s board, Becker serves on the board of directors of Dunwoody Institute and he is an active member of the Young Presidents Organization. He also has a passion for hockey, coaching youngsters to high school age hockey teams.

About Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota
Serving as Minnesota’s children’s hospital since 1924, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota has 332 staffed beds at its two hospitals in St. Paul and Minneapolis. An independent, not-for-profit health care system, Children’s of Minnesota provides care through more than 14,000 inpatient visits and more than 200,000 emergency room and other outpatient visits every year. Children’s is the only Minnesota hospital system to provide comprehensive care exclusively to children. For more information, visit www.childrensmn.org.

Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota Welcomes Prominent St. Paul Businesswoman, Cyndi Lesher, to Board of Directors

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (March 17, 2010) – Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota announced today that Cyndi Lesher, former CEO of Northern States Power Company, an Xcel Company, has joined the Children’s board of directors. Lesher has been an influential figure in Minnesota business, not only in her roles at NSP and Xcel Energy, but also as chair of Governor’s Pawlenty’s Workforce Development Council, and a member of the Women’s Economic Roundtable.

“Cyndi brings a unique combination of skills and perspective to our organization,” said Alan L. Goldbloom, MD, president and CEO of Children’s of Minnesota. “She combines a deep Cyndi Lesher
understanding of the corporate world with a great passion for what Children’s means to the families of Minnesota.”

Lesher was named one of the Twin Cities most innovative women by City Business and was selected by the Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce as the 2008 Woman of the Year. In 2007, Lesher was named president of the Host Committee for the Republican National Convention. Part of her job was to showcase Minneapolis and St. Paul to the rest of the world.

“Children’s is an organization that sometimes gets taken for granted in this community, but it is a huge asset to the state,” said Lesher. “Having a great institution like Children’s enhances our reputation nationally and improves the quality of life in Minnesota. I can’t imagine the Twin Cities without Children’s… and I don’t want to.”

In addition to serving on the Children’s board, Lesher serves as board chair for the Twin Cities Area Red Cross, and on the boards of the Animal Humane Society and the University of Minnesota Institute of Technology Advisory Board. She is a Regent Emeritus of the University of Minnesota.

About Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota
Serving as Minnesota’s children’s hospital since 1924, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota has 332 staffed beds at its two hospitals in St. Paul and Minneapolis. An independent, not-for-profit health care system, Children’s of Minnesota provides care through more than 14,000 inpatient visits and more than 200,000 emergency room and other outpatient visits every year. Children’s is the only Minnesota hospital system to provide comprehensive care exclusively to children. For more information, visit www.childrensmn.org.

Researchers Find “Micro Preemie” Infant Outcomes Improve Over Long-term Due to Quality Improvement Collaborative

Extensive retrospective study shows increased survival, reduced infections and potentially better respiratory practices among very low birth weight infants at hospitals in the collaborative

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL, March 1, 2010 —New research published in the March issue of Pediatrics shows that long-term quality improvement efforts are associated with sustained improvement in outcome and survival for very low birth weight infants, or “micro preemies,” treated in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in a quality improvement collaborative (QIC). The study defined low birth weight infants as those who weigh between 501 and 1,500 grams (less than 3 pounds, 5 ounces).

The retrospective study of more than 4,000 very low birth weight infants showed that participation in the QIC was associated with sustained implementation of potentially better respiratory practices, increased survival and reduced hospital-acquired infections. Researchers analyzed nine years of data related to practices and outcomes from the eight NICUs that form the Reduced Lung Injury group of a QIC sponsored by the Vermont Oxford Network.

“This study shows that QICs really can improve outcomes, even though it may take not weeks or months but years,” said the study’s lead author, Nathaniel R. Payne M.D., a neonatologist at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, one of the eight hospitals in the QIC.

“In addition, we saw enduring changes in the treatment practices, another key goal of QICs,” added Payne.

Research into better treatment practices for micro preemies is important due to the fact that, although significant strides have been made in the treatment of these low birth weight babies, these patients continue to face significant obstacles to their survival and quality of life.

Among the significant changes in practices that were developed and adopted early among the collaborative from 1998 to 2006 were reductions in the use of mechanical ventilation (from 75 percent to 62 percent), delivery room intubation (from 70 percent to 52 percent), postnatal steroids (from 35 percent to 10 percent) and increase in the early administration of surfactants (from 55 percent to 81 percent) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (from 57 percent to 78 percent). The study found that these potentially better practices were significant and sustained, infection rates were reduced (from 18 percent to 15 percent) and survival rates improved (from 90 percent to 93 percent).

“The bottom line is that quite a few babies survived that might not have otherwise, and the reduction in infection rates meant fewer deaths, shorter hospital stays and lower costs,” Dr. Payne said.

The study did not find, however, that these practices lead to a reduction in the rate of a chronic lung disorder among micro preemies called bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which involves inflammation and scarring in the lungs. BPD, which increased from 25 percent to 29 percent, has been associated with prolonged use of mechanical ventilation.

“Reducing BPD rates may be more complicated than merely reducing mechanical ventilation,” said Dr. Payne. “These results will help guide our future quality improvement initiatives to reduce BPD.”

Since postnatal steroids are known to impede growth and neurological development, one of the goals of the QIC was to reduce their use. However, these steroids can reduce BPD, so limiting their use may have contributed to the increase in BPD, according to Dr. Payne.

The study’s findings support the value of long-term quality improvement efforts to understand the condition of patients and the complex interactions of therapies used to treat them.

“This sort of collaborative – my hospital, Children’s of Minnesota participates in a number of them – is essential to accelerate improvement in pediatric care,” said Dr. Payne.

About Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota
Serving as Minnesota's children's hospital since 1924, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota is the seventh-largest pediatric health care organization in the United States, with 332 staffed beds at its two hospitals in St. Paul and Minneapolis. An independent, not-for-profit health care system, Children's of Minnesota provides care through more than 14,000 inpatient visits and more than 200,000 emergency room and other outpatient visits every year. Children's is the only Minnesota hospital system to provide comprehensive care exclusively to children.